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Smuggling Ussr

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NEWS
October 23, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Norwegian police, investigating the illegal transfer of advanced Western technology to the Soviet Union, have found a broad pattern of sales of European--and possibly American--machine tools and computer equipment to Soviet defense plants, according to a report released here Thursday.
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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
A high-tech smuggling operation based in Belgium sought U.S. computers to bolster the Soviet air defense system after a West German pilot landed in Moscow's Red Square on a lark, a federal official said Wednesday. The disclosure by Patrick O'Brien, the Customs Service's top agent in Miami, came as five people and two corporations were indicted by a federal grand jury in a smuggling case involving $1.8 million worth of sensitive computer equipment. The federal government based its case on information from a Dutch citizen caught working last year as an operative for the Belgian-based network, O'Brien said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1987 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
A West German businessman described as one the world's top "techno bandits" did "tremendous harm" to U.S. security by illegally diverting millions of dollars worth of American high technology to the Soviet Union, a federal prosecutor declared Tuesday. Assistant U.S. Atty. William F. Fahey charged in Los Angeles federal court that Werner Bruchhausen, 47, had provided "tremendous benefits" to the Soviets by selling them more than $6 million worth of high technology and military equipment.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Dramatically demonstrating its new openness toward religion, the Soviet Union has accepted offers of 2 million New Testaments from two Western ministries whose reputations were built on illegal "Bible smuggling" into Communist countries. The first 100,000 of 1 million gift editions from one of the clandestine groups, the Netherlands-based Open Doors, reportedly arrived in Moscow this week.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Federal agents said Friday that more arrests may be made in an alleged plot to sell the Soviet Union plans for a U.S. super-computer capable of tracking submarines and detecting incoming missiles. The plot, which allegedly involved the Soviet's top space official, was broken up when agents arrested three men after recovering plans for a billion-computations-per-second computer developed by Sunnyvale-based Saxpy Computer Corp.
NEWS
August 22, 1987 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
A fugitive Orange County man, charged in 1983 with selling computer technology to the Soviet Union, has been arrested in the tiny Yukon fishing town of Teslin by a Royal Canadian Mounted Police corporal who had seen his photo on a wanted poster. Charles McVey, 57, was arrested Wednesday after RCMP Cpl. Daniel Fudge spotted him in a restaurant the day before. McVey, who was on the U.S.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Dramatically demonstrating its new openness toward religion, the Soviet Union has accepted offers of 2 million New Testaments from two Western ministries whose reputations were built on illegal "Bible smuggling" into Communist countries. The first 100,000 of 1 million gift editions from one of the clandestine groups, the Netherlands-based Open Doors, reportedly arrived in Moscow this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1988
A medical office assistant agreed Tuesday to return to Florida to face charges of plotting to help one of the country's most notorious "technobandits" in a foiled helicopter escape from prison. Margaret Winget, 41, appeared before a federal magistrate in Los Angeles and agreed to return to Tallahassee to fight charges that she helped Werner Bruchhausen try to escape from prison there Aug. 28.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
A high-tech smuggling operation based in Belgium sought U.S. computers to bolster the Soviet air defense system after a West German pilot landed in Moscow's Red Square on a lark, a federal official said Wednesday. The disclosure by Patrick O'Brien, the Customs Service's top agent in Miami, came as five people and two corporations were indicted by a federal grand jury in a smuggling case involving $1.8 million worth of sensitive computer equipment. The federal government based its case on information from a Dutch citizen caught working last year as an operative for the Belgian-based network, O'Brien said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1988
A medical office assistant agreed Tuesday to return to Florida to face charges of plotting to help one of the country's most notorious "technobandits" in a foiled helicopter escape from prison. Margaret Winget, 41, appeared before a federal magistrate in Los Angeles and agreed to return to Tallahassee to fight charges that she helped Werner Bruchhausen try to escape from prison there Aug. 28.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Federal agents said Friday that more arrests may be made in an alleged plot to sell the Soviet Union plans for a U.S. super-computer capable of tracking submarines and detecting incoming missiles. The plot, which allegedly involved the Soviet's top space official, was broken up when agents arrested three men after recovering plans for a billion-computations-per-second computer developed by Sunnyvale-based Saxpy Computer Corp.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Norwegian police, investigating the illegal transfer of advanced Western technology to the Soviet Union, have found a broad pattern of sales of European--and possibly American--machine tools and computer equipment to Soviet defense plants, according to a report released here Thursday.
NEWS
August 22, 1987 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
A fugitive Orange County man, charged in 1983 with selling computer technology to the Soviet Union, has been arrested in the tiny Yukon fishing town of Teslin by a Royal Canadian Mounted Police corporal who had seen his photo on a wanted poster. Charles McVey, 57, was arrested Wednesday after RCMP Cpl. Daniel Fudge spotted him in a restaurant the day before. McVey, who was on the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1987 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
A West German businessman described as one the world's top "techno bandits" did "tremendous harm" to U.S. security by illegally diverting millions of dollars worth of American high technology to the Soviet Union, a federal prosecutor declared Tuesday. Assistant U.S. Atty. William F. Fahey charged in Los Angeles federal court that Werner Bruchhausen, 47, had provided "tremendous benefits" to the Soviets by selling them more than $6 million worth of high technology and military equipment.
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