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Smuggling Yugoslavia

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BUSINESS
February 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal grand jury in Los Angeles accused Yugoslav Airlines of conspiring with an Irvine company and its president to smuggle aircraft parts and supplies into Yugoslavia in the early 1990s in violation of a U.S. trade embargo. A 40-count indictment unsealed Friday accuses Yugoslav Airlines, Yugoslavia's largest carrier, exporter D.C. Precision and its president, Dusko Cavic, of smuggling $1.4 million worth of parts into Yugoslavia via Switzerland.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
A federal grand jury in Los Angeles accused Yugoslav Airlines of conspiring with an Irvine company and its president to smuggle aircraft parts and supplies into Yugoslavia in the early 1990s in violation of a U.S. trade embargo. A 40-count indictment unsealed Friday accuses Yugoslav Airlines, Yugoslavia's largest carrier, exporter D.C. Precision and its president, Dusko Cavic, of smuggling $1.4 million worth of parts into Yugoslavia via Switzerland.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 1987 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
There were leather jackets from Turkey and sets of wrenches from WestGermany. There were new headlight assemblies and floor mats for cars made in Sweden. There were jeans from Italy and baby clothes from Bulgaria. Polish men sold silver chains, dangling like tinsel from safety pins attached to their sweaters, and the fur of silver foxes, spread out on the hoods of their well-traveled cars. Vladislav Popovic, director of a small Belgrade legal firm, wondered if the chains were a good buy.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1987 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
There were leather jackets from Turkey and sets of wrenches from WestGermany. There were new headlight assemblies and floor mats for cars made in Sweden. There were jeans from Italy and baby clothes from Bulgaria. Polish men sold silver chains, dangling like tinsel from safety pins attached to their sweaters, and the fur of silver foxes, spread out on the hoods of their well-traveled cars. Vladislav Popovic, director of a small Belgrade legal firm, wondered if the chains were a good buy.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | GEORGE STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last thing Birute Galdikas wanted or needed was to get involved in rescuing orangutans from the intrigue of international smuggling rings. At her Borneo jungle camp, the UCLA-trained scientist had her hands full with the research that has made her the world's foremost authority on orangutans in the wild. In British Columbia while away from camp, she had students to teach at Simon Fraser University. But then the call came. In Bangkok Feb.
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