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Smugness

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2001
Re "Smugness Means Never Deigning to Say 'Sorry,' " Commentary, April 5: Despite Chalmers Johnson's views of America's smugness, the China spy plane issue comes down to three things. First, our plane was over international waters and lacked the maneuverability to "sharply veer" into another aircraft. (It wasn't our fault.) Second, one shouldn't apologize when one isn't at fault just to keep the peace. (Unless you're married.) Finally, regardless of fault, China should have promptly returned our plane and the crew.
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
A U.S. politician's I-don't-need-no-stinkin'-facts approach to health policy ran smack into some of those troublesome facts Tuesday at a Senate hearing on single-payer healthcare , as it's practiced in Canada and several other countries. The countries in question have successful and popular government-sponsored single-payer systems, provide universal coverage and match or outdo the United States on numerous measures of medical outcomes -- for far less money than the U.S. spends.
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OPINION
June 5, 1988
I read Scheer's dialogue with Dukakis. Scheer came off as an intelligent and well-informed observer; Dukakis both surprised and disappointed me by his evasiveness in responding to Scheer's questions and observations and by his superficial answers when he chose to be direct. Smugness, conceit, and a blithe attitude on international affairs are not the qualities America is looking for in its next President. DAVID LEVY Beverly Hills
NATIONAL
January 31, 2014 | By David Horsey
How odd is it that the two contenders in the Super Bowl -- the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos -- hail from the two states in the Union that have legalized sale and use of marijuana? Are there two activities more different than the amped-up aggression of professional football and the laid-back mellowness of smoking a joint? I've got nothing against Denver -- a perfectly fine city, as far as I'm concerned. But, as many of my readers know, I am a Seattle boy. My great-grandparents arrived in the muddy little town on the shore of Puget Sound in the 1880s.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2009
Re: David Lazarus' column "Healthcare reform: We can pay now or pay even more later," Aug. 26: I had to laugh at the unrestrained smugness of Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) when he said, "There's no reason we have to do it all now." If other senators like him think that healthcare is no big deal, then they won't mind forfeiting their taxpayer-funded plans to those who'd appreciate it. Christopher Boyce Santa Monica
MAGAZINE
September 9, 1990
The Puzzler has changed. I'm not sure when it started--it's been some time--but thetraditional tools of solution, such as etymology, history, literature and overall erudition have been supplanted. Now one needs nothing less than to be attuned to the subjective cuteness of Sylvia Bursztyn and Barry Tunick. The Puzzler used to provide a goodly dose of personal satisfaction upon its completion; a certain smugness. Now, alas, I feel diminished by it. Rather than a battle of wits, it has become an exercise in deciphering the lame puns of its creators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1989
I happen to think that Dannemeyer and other elected officials who support his point of view are the "narrow-minded people" of our society. In the name of "Judeo-Christian ethics" we would probably discriminate against all kinds of people. After all, why should a Buddhist be allowed to rent or buy a house or some group that he doesn't happen to agree with that doesn't happen to fit his mold? He says or implies that groups have every right to think or practice any life style but don't do it next door or where I can see it. That philosophy has been used to keep Hispanics or African Americans or other groups from moving into "our" neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989
Not being a Washington writer, physician, lawyer, university professor or anything else of consequence, I cannot expect space equal to that accorded to Peirce, but I can wish that you will print a letter response. The column is a scarcely-disguised advocacy of prohibition from gambling. While some of his suggestions have some validity from a view of public economy, e.g., the business of advertising, the gist of the article is that people, especially poor people, don't know how best to spend their money.
OPINION
August 24, 1986
Southern California is too smug about smog. True, the air is generally cleaner than it has been in two decades. But the most basic standard of clean air that other cities may meet by 1987 cannot be met here in this century. There is only an outside chance that the region can tighten existing controls faster than the number of people and cars can grow. If it can't, the air will start getting dirtier again in four short years. On paper, California looks like a winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002
Jan Breslauer does a disservice to the theater ("Mavericks bow to change," Nov. 10) by representing as "mavericks" a number of highly conventional, even smug public-relations types who are still mouthing the elitist cliches of the politically correct: Mainstream audiences are bad, but specific minority audiences the salt of the earth; too many white males still control the money bags, etc. The conflict facing these spokespeople would be laughable if...
SPORTS
January 16, 2014 | By Lance Pugmire
CHICAGO - The Ducks won't dare say they've solved the Chicago Blackhawks, but their 5-0 run after a December 2011 road loss is nonetheless head-turning. The teams renew acquaintances Friday night at United Center. "We've won enough games against them that we have a level of confidence to know we can beat them," Ducks center Nick Bonino said of the defending Stanley Cup champions. "You can't go in thinking you have their number, but you can go in knowing you can win. " The Ducks - leading the NHL with a 36-8-5 mark that includes a record-tying 18 wins in 19 games - swept the Blackhawks (30-8-11)
OPINION
December 26, 2013 | Meghan Daum
Of all the notable year-end phenomena cited in this column and others, only one rose to the level of prominence and annoyance that I'd define as Biggest Conversational Irritant of 2013: the abuse and misuse of the word "humble. " Make that the entire concept of humble. It seems to have gotten lost in the shuffle of self-promotion that sets the tone of social media, which in turn sets the tone of too much contemporary discourse. Never mind that just about every dictionary defines "humble" as some version of "marked by meekness or modesty in behavior," "showing deferential or submissive respect" or "low in rank, quality or station.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
At ABC's upfront presentation Tuesday in New York City, Jimmy Kimmel slammed the perennial first-place finisher CBS as a bunch of “smug” jerks (though he opted for a more a colorful epithet that isn't fit to be repeated here). Though Kimmel's diss got the crowd at Avery Fisher Hall worked up, a day later CBS didn't seem too worried about appearing cocky: If anything, the network seemed to embrace its reputation as the Kanye West of broadcast TV. The day-long victory lap began early at an informal breakfast with reporters, where CBS Corp.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
People whose body mass index is considered normal and healthy may want to think twice about that designation if their waist-to-hip ratio is more suggestive of an apple than a pear, a new study from the Mayo Clinic finds. Normal-weight Americans with an accumulation of fat around the middle were more likely to die of heart disease, and of any other cause, during a 14-year study period than were people whose BMI categorized them as obese but who were more pear-shaped. In fact, they had the highest risk of cardiovascular death of all the categories, including people whose BMIs identified them as overweight or obese.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
During the 18th century, a fashionable pastime among London's rich and royal was to visit Bethlem Royal Hospital, most commonly known as Bedlam, and watch the antics of the mentally ill. In the 21st century, it is the rich and famous who are gaped at, their habits and habitats reveled in and reviled through the lens of reality TV. What started as an aspirational experience, epitomized by the gushing "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous," has become...
WORLD
February 13, 2010 | By Henry Chu
It's not hard to find some smug smiles in Britain these days as the rest of Europe grapples with a debt crisis that has cast doubt on the future of the euro. This island nation has fiercely resisted adoption of the single regional currency and has clung to the pound as a symbol of tradition and independence. Before a summit of European Union leaders this week, his usual Scottish dourness barely succeeded in masking Prime Minister Gordon Brown's schadenfreude when he declared that the euro's problems were for euro-using nations such as France and Germany to solve, not British taxpayers.
NEWS
July 21, 2007 | MEGHAN DAUM
FOR A WORLD that's messed up, we sure have a lot of goodness being shoved in our faces. If we're not hearing about Angelina Jolie's impending sainthood (a profile in the July issue of Esquire magazine unblinkingly calls her "the best woman in the world"), we're busy trying to convert our cars to run on nothing but lavender oil and beer. Folks who as recently as the mid-'90s were littering on their grannies' front yards and mocking mentors of any kind are now buying back carbon emissions, volunteering in droves (61.2 million last year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989
Returnee Meisler is suffering a vertigo caused by his self-conscious effort to appear as an objective reporter. His petulant case of reverse jet lag might be alleviated by a very careful rereading of "Democracy in America," written by a truly objective reporter, Alexis de Tocqueville. CHARMIAN ETINGEN Corona Del Mar
BUSINESS
September 6, 2009
Re: David Lazarus' column "Healthcare reform: We can pay now or pay even more later," Aug. 26: I had to laugh at the unrestrained smugness of Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) when he said, "There's no reason we have to do it all now." If other senators like him think that healthcare is no big deal, then they won't mind forfeiting their taxpayer-funded plans to those who'd appreciate it. Christopher Boyce Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2009 | Philip Brandes
When it comes to driving an Orwellian wedge between language and truth, the Stalin-era Soviet Union had few peers, as the premiere of "The Letters" from North Hollywood's Andak Stage Company chillingly reminds us. A duel of wits at the crossroads of art and politics, John W. Lowell's taut, impeccably performed two-hander is set in 1931 against a totalitarian backdrop in which reality is entirely what those in power pronounce it to be. A sense of...
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