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Snail Mail

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OPINION
February 3, 2011 | Meghan Daum
I've always loved mail. By that I mean the mail that arrives in a physical mailbox six days a week, not e-mail. Well, I love that too, but it's a cheap thrill. My heart belongs to snail mail. This love affair began decades ago, back when the "snail" qualifier wasn't necessary. As a child, I'd sort through the mail that came every afternoon, seeing in it clues to the inner lives of my parents. Among the bills and bank statements there would sometimes be a letter from a faraway friend or relative, handwritten on stationery or typed on an IBM Selectric and stuffed with photos showing how fast some kid was growing up or how great the kitchen remodel was. Even more fascinating were the holiday cards and newsletters from classmates and roommates and neighbors my parents had known before I came along, a barely comprehensible concept that made those correspondents seem to me like characters in a book.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook has begun sending out invitations for its next media event, but not in a way one would expect from a top tech company. Facebook is using the U.S. Postal Service. Numerous news publications discovered envelope-clad invitations for a June 20 Facebook event in their mailboxes Friday. Facebook is no stranger to media events -- the company seems to hold one every two months or so -- and it doesn't normally send out its invitations via old-fashioned mail. PHOTOS: Last-minute Father's Day gift idea: Tablets under $200 Like others in the industry, Facebook typically uses email for its event invitations.
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BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook has begun sending out invitations for its next media event, but not in a way one would expect from a top tech company. Facebook is using the U.S. Postal Service. Numerous news publications discovered envelope-clad invitations for a June 20 Facebook event in their mailboxes Friday. Facebook is no stranger to media events -- the company seems to hold one every two months or so -- and it doesn't normally send out its invitations via old-fashioned mail. PHOTOS: Last-minute Father's Day gift idea: Tablets under $200 Like others in the industry, Facebook typically uses email for its event invitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Twitter, text-messaging, email, apps, social media and an ever-proliferating stampede of wireless devices have colonized pretty much every form of communication that can be digitized. Yet one contrarian Los Angeles company believes slow but steady snail mail wins the race when it comes to deepening connections between online gurus and their followers. Billing itself as a "subscription service for wonderful things," Quarterly delivers mystery boxes the old-fashioned way - through the U.S. Postal Service.
WORLD
October 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A postcard that a Japanese soldier mailed from Burma during World War II has reached a recipient in Japan 64 years later, said a university whose student helped deliver it. Shizuo Nagano, 80, of the southwestern prefecture of Kochi, received the card Friday, a statement from Mukogawa Women's University said. The sender, Nobuchika Yamashita, died in the war in 1944. A U.S. soldier got the card in Nagasaki.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1998 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite e-mail, the Web, fax machines and overnight delivery services, the U.S. Postal Service delivered more than 180 billion pieces of mail in 1996--about 421 pieces for each American. Postal mail--or "snail mail" as we techies call it--remains one of the most viable means of communication for small businesses. It's the way most businesses send and pay bills, and it's still a great way to market and deliver products to your customers.
TRAVEL
February 13, 2000 | LAURA BLY
Call it the World Wide Whine. Fed up with lousy service, operational snafus and misleading marketing, disgruntled travelers are flooding the World Wide Web with complaints. Once confined primarily to Internet mailing lists and newsgroups, their gripes are popping up on a burgeoning variety of Web sites, from home-grown efforts designed to "diss" an individual airline to slick e-commerce operations that promise to help resolve vacation disputes--for a fee. Even the feds are joining the fray.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
Lawyers, rest assured. It is ethical to communicate with clients via e-mail. That's the conclusion of the American Bar Assn.'s Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility. Earlier, some state ethics boards raised concerns about e-mail because messages might be intercepted by hackers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001
Re "Prune the Billboard Forest," editorial, June 4: We have radio, TV, magazines, newspapers, e-mail, snail mail and the telephone--all bombarding us with advertisements. Do we really need billboards at all? Burma Shave signs have long been obsolete. The combination of a plethora of billboards and cell phones on a freeway boggles the mind and constitutes a safety hazard. Many scenic countries get along without any billboards, thank you very much. The beauty of our part of the country (and Los Angeles in particular)
NATIONAL
February 7, 2013 | By David Horsey
As AOL used to say, “You've got mail!” But maybe not on Saturdays if the mail you are looking for is being delivered by the much-maligned “snail mail” of the United States Postal Service. On Wednesday, the USPS announced Saturday delivery of letters would be eliminated by August in order to save $2 billion annually. The Postal Service has been struggling financially for a long time, as we all know, so this sort of cutback is hardly surprising. As the latest reduction in service is discussed and debated, though, it is worth remembering that the Postal Service's troubles are not entirely a result of the historic shift in how Americans communicate with one another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - The most courageous politician in California - probably the nation - is a Berkeley city councilman, Gordon Wozniak. His gutsy act: proposing that the government tax email. Yes, sacrosanct, time-gobbling, out-of-control email. "I got a lot of nasty emails nationally," he says. "You are making Berkeley look really silly," one person wrote. Another called him "the epitome of a communist - you and all your commy liberal idiots. " Wozniak, however, is certified brainy - a retired nuclear scientist, a futurist who, he admits, may be ahead of his time about taxing email.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2013 | By David Horsey
As AOL used to say, “You've got mail!” But maybe not on Saturdays if the mail you are looking for is being delivered by the much-maligned “snail mail” of the United States Postal Service. On Wednesday, the USPS announced Saturday delivery of letters would be eliminated by August in order to save $2 billion annually. The Postal Service has been struggling financially for a long time, as we all know, so this sort of cutback is hardly surprising. As the latest reduction in service is discussed and debated, though, it is worth remembering that the Postal Service's troubles are not entirely a result of the historic shift in how Americans communicate with one another.
OPINION
February 6, 2011
Checking out state workers' salaries Re "State turns up more big salaries," Feb. 2 So California state Controller John Chiang has demanded salary information from nearly 900 local government entities. The report is part of Chiang's effort to document the compensation of all government officials and employees in the state. I would hope that this will include state employees in general, and University of California and California State University administrators in particular.
OPINION
February 3, 2011 | Meghan Daum
I've always loved mail. By that I mean the mail that arrives in a physical mailbox six days a week, not e-mail. Well, I love that too, but it's a cheap thrill. My heart belongs to snail mail. This love affair began decades ago, back when the "snail" qualifier wasn't necessary. As a child, I'd sort through the mail that came every afternoon, seeing in it clues to the inner lives of my parents. Among the bills and bank statements there would sometimes be a letter from a faraway friend or relative, handwritten on stationery or typed on an IBM Selectric and stuffed with photos showing how fast some kid was growing up or how great the kitchen remodel was. Even more fascinating were the holiday cards and newsletters from classmates and roommates and neighbors my parents had known before I came along, a barely comprehensible concept that made those correspondents seem to me like characters in a book.
NEWS
April 11, 2009 | Eryn Brown
Recently we asked readers to send in their questions about how we screen, compile and edit letters at The Times. You wanted to know about everything from how much mail we receive to whether we open hard-copy mail to how our political opinions influence what ends up in print. We answer a few of your questions here. -- Eryn Brown, letters editor What is the typical volume of letters you receive about a given story? Most days, the letters page receives several hundred e-mails, as well as a few faxes and letters sent by mail.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2009 | Alana Semuels
The post office doesn't deliver mail to Steven Stark's Santa Maria home anymore. It's not that Stark, the 36-year-old owner of an Internet company, is unpopular. He just decided that he'd rather deal with all of his correspondence online. Millions of Americans receive online versions of their bills and bank statements. But Stark is one of tens of thousands who have decided they don't need any physical mail, be it love letters or advertising come-ons.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
It would be a great idea if, whenever you want your subscribers' opinions, you give them the opportunity to offer their opinions online. The recent comics opinion survey would have been much easier if you could have had the same online survey form available so that myself and others could have offered our opinions in an easy, less troublesome way than snail mail. I wanted to participate in this survey, but not if I have to go to the trouble and expense of filling it out by hand, putting on a stamp (at my expense)
BUSINESS
April 26, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER
Tired of putting pen to paper for those e-mail-less holdouts in your life? Letterpost.com (http://www.letterpost.com), a Mountain View, Calif., start-up, now offers you a way to communicate without risking a pesky ink smudge. For a dollar per message, Letterpost will print your e-mail in letter form and send it via U.S. mail within five minutes, the company says. Similar services are being arranged for mail to Europe and Asia.
WORLD
October 21, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A postcard that a Japanese soldier mailed from Burma during World War II has reached a recipient in Japan 64 years later, said a university whose student helped deliver it. Shizuo Nagano, 80, of the southwestern prefecture of Kochi, received the card Friday, a statement from Mukogawa Women's University said. The sender, Nobuchika Yamashita, died in the war in 1944. A U.S. soldier got the card in Nagasaki.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2006 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to getting first-class mail, two weeks is too long. That's what Wayne Adelstein told Rep. Henry A. Waxman's staff members recently when he handed over two envelopes that he said were emblematic of slow mail deliveries in the region. One of the local first-class letters had been received by the North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce in Northridge, and one had been mailed by the chamber to a recipient in Long Beach. One letter had taken 10 days to arrive and the other two weeks.
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