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January 26, 1986 | GEORGE HARMON SCOTT
Snail season is soon to start in earnest, so get ready. By the end of February brown garden snails will be climbing up daffodils and cymbidiums to nibble on the flowers. If you'd like to avoid using the many sprays and poisons available, you can gather the snails by hand soon after dark or early in the morning. Decollate or cannibal snails can also help keep the brown garden snail under control, since they devour their eggs and small snails. There are a couple of hitches, however.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2014 | Louis Sahagun
When it comes to a battered environment, few places can match Ken Malloy Harbor Regional Park, an empire of weeds, trash and vagrant encampments surrounding a polluted lake crawling with nonnative snails as big as baseballs, voracious water snakes and snapping turtles. The park's Lake Machado is best known as the swampy hideout of the abandoned alligator Reggie, who won international fame after officials spent $200,000 trying to catch him. Reggie was finally snagged in 2007 with a dog-catcher's pole.
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SCIENCE
September 27, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
A component of chocolate, wine and green tea can enhance memories -- in snails, at least. A new study, released Wednesday in the Journal of Experimental Biology, showed that modest concentrations of the flavonoid epicatechin caused snails' memories to last longer and be harder to overwrite. In nature, flavonoids are found in many species of plants, often adding color to plant skin by serving as pigments. They have long been studied as possible cancer fighters and cognitive enhancers because they have beneficial antioxidant effects on cells in a dish.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Turbo," the racing-snails movie from this summer, is already a cartoon series, "Turbo: F.A.S.T.," suggesting that such an eventuality was in the cards from the beginning (or somewhere near it). That other DreamWorks-made cartoons - including "The Penguins of Madagascar," "Kung Fu Panda" and "Monsters vs. Aliens," all on Nickelodeon - have taken the same route, suggests that, more than an eventuality, it was an inevitability. One difference is that it is being released by Netflix, the streamcaster's first kids' show and ergo a historic moment.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Genetic analysis of certain snails in Ireland suggests that the creeping mollusks may have arrived on the Emerald Isle when humans carried them there some 8,000 years ago -- all the way from the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain. In a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE , University of Nottingham researchers Angus Davison and Adele Grindon described how they examined DNA samples cut from the foot muscles of 880 separate individuals of the common land snail species Cepaea nemoralis . The snails, which represented 111 separate populations, were collected by researchers and volunteers throughout Europe between 2005 and 2007.
SCIENCE
May 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
An epic battle is raging in South Florida: man against snail. The state is struggling to contain an invasion of the giant African land snail, a species that thrives in hot and wet tropical climates. These gooey and destructive mollusks grow up to 8.5 inches long, feast on 500 different types of plants and nibble on calcium-rich stucco, which they use to construct their cone-shaped shells. The snails are originally from East Africa but can now be found throughout the world. Aside from destroying plants and buildings, they can also be carriers of a type of meningitis.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | From Reuters
A snail set what is claimed to be a long-distance record for dragging a stone over a flat surface Saturday. Hercules, owned by 8-year-old Miren Castanos, smashed the previous Spanish record when it hauled an 8 1/2-ounce stone a total of 16 3/4 inches in a 10-minute time trial, organizers of the contest said. Seventy-nine snails, each of them attached by a piece of string to a flat stone, took part in the annual competition in this village in northern Spain's Basque region.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The federal government placed a rare Missouri cave snail on its list of endangered species. Tumbling Creek Cave snails have died off in such great numbers that scientists are worried about the health of the cave stream and its water source, an aquifer that serves both animals and the surrounding community. Snails are a barometer of water quality, said scientist Tom Aley, who is leading the effort to save the snail.
HOME & GARDEN
June 29, 2006
I'D like to offer an environmental suggestion regarding the slugs and snails problem ["A Deep Seeded Lupine Mystery," June 8]. My uncle told me to buy some beer and pour it into a bowl. Place the bowl(s) next to the suffering plant(s) in the early evening. You might need to dig a small indentation in the ground to lower the bowl closer to ground level. During the night the snails and slugs will be drawn into the bowl instead of the plants and will not be able to climb out. I have tried this and it really works (replace the beer daily)
NEWS
August 16, 1985 | CONNIE STEWART
--His eyes glazed over and his hand shook with the final spoonfuls, but Thomas (Muskrat) Greene broke a world record for gluttony by devouring 2.2 pounds of snails in less than three minutes. "Everybody's got a gift, and his happens to be his stomach," observer Sara Burlason said in London. Greene, 45, from Deale, Md., munched the 220 shelled, sauteed delicacies in 2 minutes, 43.95 seconds--more than a minute faster than his English rival's all-time mark for snail swallowing.
SCIENCE
September 17, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Deep in a Croatian cave, scientists have discovered a tiny snail with a shell that looks as if it is made of glass. The Zospeum tholussum specimen was found more than half a mile beneath the Earth's surface, in the  Lukina Jama-Trojama cave system, one of the 20 deepest cave systems in the world.  The snail is minuscule -- just 1 millimeter across. It is part of a group of snails generally found along the drainage systems of caves. Like its Zospeum cousins , Zospeum tholussum has limited eyesight and mobility, according to researchers.  "Since they are grazing microorganisms from stones, mud and wood that has been washed into the cave, they have everything around that they need," said Alexander Weigand of Goethe-University in Frankfurt, Germany, who described the snail in the journal Subterranean Biology.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are underdogs. And there are underdogs. Then there is "Turbo," a garden snail who dreams of winning the Indy 500. Honestly, they pretty much had me at "racing snails. " The idea for animation's latest 3-D event movie sounded absurd enough to provide fertile visual terrain: the vroom, vroom grit of Indy racing action, the Garden of Eden lushness of tomato vine crawling. There is the general shape of all things snail as well: the shell, the slime, those antennae eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
The San Fernando Valley has provided the setting for countless memorable film scenes. The tree-lined street where E.T. rides a bike into the sky is in Granada Hills, the high school where the stoners disrupt class in "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" is in Van Nuys and the nightclub where Dirk Diggler is discovered in "Boogie Nights" is in Reseda. Now the Valley - with its flat vistas, low-slung ranch homes and even its cluttered strip malls - is getting animated in "Turbo," a movie about a garden snail who dreams of racing in the Indy 500, which opens Wednesday.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Genetic analysis of certain snails in Ireland suggests that the creeping mollusks may have arrived on the Emerald Isle when humans carried them there some 8,000 years ago -- all the way from the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain. In a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE , University of Nottingham researchers Angus Davison and Adele Grindon described how they examined DNA samples cut from the foot muscles of 880 separate individuals of the common land snail species Cepaea nemoralis . The snails, which represented 111 separate populations, were collected by researchers and volunteers throughout Europe between 2005 and 2007.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Facebook has begun sending out invitations for its next media event, but not in a way one would expect from a top tech company. Facebook is using the U.S. Postal Service. Numerous news publications discovered envelope-clad invitations for a June 20 Facebook event in their mailboxes Friday. Facebook is no stranger to media events -- the company seems to hold one every two months or so -- and it doesn't normally send out its invitations via old-fashioned mail. PHOTOS: Last-minute Father's Day gift idea: Tablets under $200 Like others in the industry, Facebook typically uses email for its event invitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Celine Wright
It's getting confusing keeping track of Snoop Dogg's animal aliases. Dogg, Lion -- and now snail? The garden creature was the reason for his performance Wednesday afternoon at L.A. Live in downtown Los Angeles, where he was promoting the new animated feature “Turbo.” Snoop has the lead song on the soundtrack and also provides the voice of a snail called Smoove Move. The event, thrown for attendees of the E3 gaming convention, included a mini concert and appearances from “Turbo” stars Michael Peña and Michelle Rodriguez.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | United Press International
A rising epidemic of schistosomiasis, a parasite-caused disease that attacks major organs and the nervous system, has struck more than 1 million people across southern China, a news report said Saturday. The provinces of Hunan, Jiangxi, Anhui and Jiangsu have been particularly hard hit, especially in areas surrounding major rivers and lakes, it said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Rock-eating snails appear to make a critical contribution to the fertilization of desert soils by speeding the return of a valuable nutrient--nitrogen--to the ground. The snails dine on a diet of limestone rock containing lichens, a mixture of nitrogen-containing fungi and algae, and return the nutrient to the soil in their feces, contributing 11% of the nitrogen released into the desert soil each year, researchers reported last week in the British journal Nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Hugh Hart
Twitter, text-messaging, email, apps, social media and an ever-proliferating stampede of wireless devices have colonized pretty much every form of communication that can be digitized. Yet one contrarian Los Angeles company believes slow but steady snail mail wins the race when it comes to deepening connections between online gurus and their followers. Billing itself as a "subscription service for wonderful things," Quarterly delivers mystery boxes the old-fashioned way - through the U.S. Postal Service.
SCIENCE
May 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
An epic battle is raging in South Florida: man against snail. The state is struggling to contain an invasion of the giant African land snail, a species that thrives in hot and wet tropical climates. These gooey and destructive mollusks grow up to 8.5 inches long, feast on 500 different types of plants and nibble on calcium-rich stucco, which they use to construct their cone-shaped shells. The snails are originally from East Africa but can now be found throughout the world. Aside from destroying plants and buildings, they can also be carriers of a type of meningitis.
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