Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSnake
IN THE NEWS

Snake

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Michael McGough
There's a fair amount of snark online Monday about Jamie Coots , the Pentecostal pastor and reality-TV star who was fatally bitten by a snake he was handling in over-literal adherence to Luke 10:19. ("Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.”) An atheist website offered this tasteless observation: “Pentecostal preachers are among the most poisonous creatures on Earth, but every once in while they bump into things even more venomous.” But even fellow Christians are finding fault with Coot for misinterpreting Scripture or presuming to test God. A friend of mine suggested that the biblical injunction that inspired Coot to handle a serpent should be properly read to mean that if a believer happens to come across a snake, God will step in, but that doesn't mean you should seek out the critters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
An albino variety of California kingsnake popular in the pet trade has infested the Canary Islands, decimating native bird, mammal and lizard species that have had no time to evolve evasive patterns in what was once a stable ecology northwest of Africa. Unchecked by natural predators, the kingsnake population has exploded, say U.S. Geological Survey biologists helping the Spanish archipelago attempt to control the highly adaptive and secretive predators. "The kingsnakes in question are from a species found in San Diego and bred in captivity," said Robert Fisher, a research biologist with the USGS.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1995 | AL MARTINEZ
Good news for those living in the fire-ravaged, flood-damaged canyons. It's creature season again. Due to the unusually warm weather, rattlesnakes are slithering from their hiding places, black widows are crawling into attack positions and mountain lions are out prowling for food. A case in point is Lisa Zuckerman. She went whistling down her walkway near Old Topanga Canyon Boulevard one day and found a rattler stretched across the path, sunning itself. "I couldn't believe it," she said later.
SPORTS
February 24, 2014 | By Houston Mitchell
Former WWE superstar Jake "The Snake" Roberts, who will be inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in April, has a cancerous tumor behind his knee that needs to be removed. Roberts told TMZ.com that he will have surgery Tuesday morning. "If the devil can't defeat me, cancer doesn't stand a chance! Pray for sick children who face this horrible disease 'cause the Snake will be just fine," said Roberts, who spent years battling drug and alcohol abuse. Roberts was famous for carrying a boa constrictor named Damien to the ring for his matches and for making the DDT a popular move.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Ruben Vives
Neighbors of elementary school teacher William Buchman in Santa Ana said they thought someone had died in his home because the stench was so strong. Instead it was 404 snakes -- more than half of them dead -- that were packed inside the five-bedroom house. There were also scores of rats that scampered over furniture when officers first entered the home. "We thought someone was dead," said Forest Long Sr., 62, who lives next door to Buchman on Fernwood Drive.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Yessss, that's right, folks: Snake oil - maybe it's good for what ails you! The blood of a feeding python is coursing with fats that help the reptile's heart grow big and strong, according to scientists at the University of Colorado in Boulder. In a study just published in the journal Science, a team led by Leslie Leinwand decided to take a look at why the hearts of pythons enlarge so impressively after the snake has had one of its rare and very hearty meals. And we do mean impressively: Within 48 to 72 hours after feeding, the creature's heart expands its mass by 40%. Why does it do that?
NEWS
June 20, 2011
Evan Rachel Wood faced a double challenge in tackling the role of eldest daughter, Veda, in the HBO miniseries "Mildred Pierce": She not only had to portray the unsympathetic partner in a famous pas de deux, she also had to be believable as a coloratura soprano. While it isn't her voice heard performing the arias — that belongs to Seoul-born opera star Sumi Jo — Wood still had a lot of work to do. "For two months, I listened to that music and only that music, and worked with an opera coach to learn the breathing and posture.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Jane Engle
The Empress of the North riverboat, which was pulled from service when its former operator, Majestic America Line, went out of business in 2008, will again ply the rivers of the Pacific Northwest. The five-deck, 223-passenger vessel was recently bought by the Memphis-based American Queen Steamboat Co. and renamed the American Empress. Next year it will begin cruising the Columbia and Snake rivers between its home port, Portland, Ore., and Clarkson, Wash. Among the ports of call will be Astoria and the Dalles in Oregon and  Sacajawea State Park in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
“Being newly single in middle age.... It's like opening one of those child's toys where the snake pops out of the can.” So goes “The Snake Can” at the Odyssey Theatre. Kathryn Graf's wry, insightful dramedy about three longtime girlfriends and their internecine midlife crises surmounts some post-larval structural blips with pertinence, humor and heart. Meet fetching, successful Meg (Sharon Sharth, funny and convincing), a twice-divorced New Yorker unable to sustain even casual relationships, and her party posse.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
In Shanghai , guests at the Peninsula Hotel will greet the Chinese New Year by snaking through the lobby doing a lion dance. In Bangkok and Beijing , they will celebrate at the Peninsula's afternoon tea. And in Hong Kong , they will watch the city's colorful holiday fireworks show explode over Victoria Harbour while sipping Champagne on the Sun Terrace. Most of the events are taking place Feb. 10, when the Chinese New Year kicks off in Asia and around the world. Peninsula Hotels, whose history in China dates to 1866, is welcoming the Year of the Snake with special events and rates at its nine properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
Arriving less than a week after the high-profile death of Pentecostal pastor and reality-show star Jamie Coots by snakebite, the religious thriller "Holy Ghost People" is well poised to exploit fears of an already misunderstood spiritual minority. "Holy Ghost People" takes its name from a 1967 documentary by Peter Adair that captures the soul of a politically progressive West Virginia congregation that handles snakes and speaks in tongues. Director Mitchell Altieri's disappointing feature makes nasty beasts of the very people Adair strived to humanize, portraying them as violent, intolerant hicks straight out of central casting.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Michael McGough
There's a fair amount of snark online Monday about Jamie Coots , the Pentecostal pastor and reality-TV star who was fatally bitten by a snake he was handling in over-literal adherence to Luke 10:19. ("Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.”) An atheist website offered this tasteless observation: “Pentecostal preachers are among the most poisonous creatures on Earth, but every once in while they bump into things even more venomous.” But even fellow Christians are finding fault with Coot for misinterpreting Scripture or presuming to test God. A friend of mine suggested that the biblical injunction that inspired Coot to handle a serpent should be properly read to mean that if a believer happens to come across a snake, God will step in, but that doesn't mean you should seek out the critters.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Jamie Coots, the Appalachian minister and "Snake Salvation" reality star who died Saturday after a rattlesnake he was handling in church bit him on the hand, will be remembered with a tribute special to air on National Geographic Channel. Coots, who was 42, was the star of NatGeo's "Snake Salvation," which aired for a single season on the cable channel last year. He handled snakes while ministering at his church in Middleboro, Ky. He was a practitioner of a 100-year-old tradition that involved the handling of live and deadly snakes in church.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2014 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Snake-handling preacher Jamie Coots has died of snakebite. In some readings of the Bible, faith is stronger than venom. "Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you," Jesus tells his disciples in the gospel of Luke. The Kentucky preacher lived by this belief and, in the view of emergency responders, he died by it too, when a snake bit him at church.  [Updated, 9:06 a.m. PST Feb. 17:  "If he had lived and woke up in a hospital bed, he would have blamed every one of us," his son Cody Coots told Knoxville's WVLT-TV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
Reptile specialists are continuing their uphill efforts to nurse more than 170 malnourished and ill snakes back to health after they were pulled from a house in Santa Ana where a grade school teacher lived amid a clutter of mice, rats and pythons - many of them dead. Since being rescued from the home, 11 of the snakes have died, bringing the total to 235. Jason Haywood, president of the Southern California Herpetology Assn. and Rescue, said most of the snakes died of liver failure on the first night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores and Ruben Vives
Neighbors of elementary school teacher William Buchman in Santa Ana said they thought someone had died in his home because the stench was so strong. Instead it was 404 snakes -- more than half of them dead -- that were packed inside the five-bedroom house. There were also scores of rats that scampered over furniture when officers first entered the home. "We thought someone was dead," said Forest Long Sr., 62, who lives next door to Buchman on Fernwood Drive.
NEWS
February 5, 1987
San Francisco International Airport officials have taken proposed expansion plans "back to the drawing board," in the words of one official, because the planned development would threaten the habitat of an endangered species of snake. A three-year study by the state Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Wildlife Service recommended that 120 acres across the Bayshore Freeway from the airport in San Bruno should not be developed because doing so would require moving the snakes.
SCIENCE
September 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have discovered four new species of legless lizards in California, including one species that lives beneath the sand dunes near LAX. But before we go on, let's get one thing straight: Yes, a snake is a legless lizard, but not all legless lizards are snakes.  Throughout the history of lizard evolution, several lizard lineages have lost their legs, explains James Parham of Cal State Fullerton. Snakes are the best-known and most diverse of these lineages, but more than 200 other types of limbless lizards exist throughout the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Ruben Vives and Adolfo Flores
A Santa Ana house where authorities Wednesday discovered as many as 400 snakes is so littered with cages and rats and snakes - some alive, many dead - that animal control officers said they are still making their way through the cluttered house and haven't thoroughly searched all the rooms. A Newport Beach grade-school teacher who lived in the house was arrested early Wednesday on suspicion of animal cruelty, and authorities obtained a search warrant to scour the home. William Buchman, 53, is identified on various reptile collector websites as a ball python breeder and was using a process known as “morphing” to achieve different patterns on the snakes, said Jason Haywood president of Southern California Herpetologist Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
Police serving a search warrant at a home in Santa Ana on Wednesday discovered as many as 400 snakes inside. Officers served the search warrant at the home in the 2900 block of Fernwood Drive after the Police Department's animal services section received complaints from neighbors about a foul odor coming from the home.  Santa Ana Police Cpl. Anthony Bertagna said about 300 to 400 pythons were discovered inside. Some of the pythons were alive, some dead and decaying. PHOTOS: Inside the Santa Ana snake house He said he was standing 200 to 300 feet away as officers were executing the search warrant and could smell the stench.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|