Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSnake Eyes
IN THE NEWS

Snake Eyes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Whitesnake is back--with a new guitarist! He's none other than Steve Vai (late of David Lee Roth's band), who handled the guitar chores on White-snake's new album, "Slip of the Tongue," when regular axeman (and co-songwriter) Adrian Vandenberg was felled by a hand injury. Vai will also be on hand (along with Vandenberg) when the band kicks off its tour in February. Due out Nov.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2012 | By Todd Martens
Despite possessing a rather unassuming sound -- one built on gentle acoustic strumming and comforting harmonies -- local act the Milk Carton Kids have had a rather booming year and a half. Two self-released albums published straight-to-the-Web are said to have racked-up more than 130,000 downloads, and artists such as acoustic stars the Old Crow Medicine Show and the Punch Brothers have taken the Hotel Cafe regulars on tour.  In late 2012 it was revealed that the Milk Carton Kids had signed to local indie Anti-, the Silver Lake-based label home to the likes of Tom Waits, Neko Case and more.
Advertisement
SPORTS
November 1, 2010 | Sam Farmer
The NFL doesn't allow gambling, but its teams sure have made some risky rolls of the dice this season. And, all of a sudden, a few of those gambles are going belly-up: The Minnesota Vikings apparently parted ways with disgruntled receiver Randy Moss on Monday, less than a month after trading for him. The Dallas Cowboys, who opted to keep embattled Coach Wade Phillips, are a 1-6 disaster desperately watching their season go down the...
SPORTS
November 1, 2010 | Sam Farmer
The NFL doesn't allow gambling, but its teams sure have made some risky rolls of the dice this season. And, all of a sudden, a few of those gambles are going belly-up: The Minnesota Vikings apparently parted ways with disgruntled receiver Randy Moss on Monday, less than a month after trading for him. The Dallas Cowboys, who opted to keep embattled Coach Wade Phillips, are a 1-6 disaster desperately watching their season go down the...
BUSINESS
August 11, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE
The weekend's two big arrivals "Halloween H20" and "Snake Eyes" both opened to commendable numbers but have vastly different profit potential. At $17 million, "Halloween" should almost break even after its domestic theatrical run, despite Miramax's traditional marketing overkill. Depending on how well it performs overseas, "Halloween" could be very profitable indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1998 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brian De Palma isn't talking, and neither is Paramount, but indications are that the outspoken director has bowed to pressure from the studio and the Motion Picture Assn. of America to make cuts in his new movie "Snake Eyes." De Palma blasted the MPAA last week and said he would not trim the film to get a PG-13 rating, maintaining the cuts would damage the movie. He said he would appeal the ratings board decision to give it an R rating without the cuts, despite a lack of support from the studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1993 | Ryan Murphy
It's been more than three weeks since Madonna has caused any kind of public commotion. After the publication of her coffee-table book "Sex" and the ratings squabble involving her film "Body of Evidence," we came to expect weekly developments. Her last big headline-grabber: ripping up a photo of tabloid and TV movie king Joey Buttafuoco on "Saturday Night Live" a la Sinead O'Connor. The singer-actress-author is keeping a low profile, sources say, while preparing for Abel Ferrara's "Snake Eyes."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was as if the legendary mobster himself had rolled the dice and come up snake eyes. "Bugsy," the TriStar film that pulled in a leading 10 Academy Award nominations, won only two Oscars on Monday night. And those were for art direction and costume design.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Brian De Palma is a superb technician in search of a great film. Regrettably, "Snake Eyes" is not it, not even close. A cartoonish entertainment about corruption, assassination and far-flung conspiracies, "Snake Eyes" exists purely as a vehicle for De Palma to show off the kind of wizardly camera work that is his passion. Collaborating for the seventh time (including "Mission: Impossible," "The Untouchables" and the underrated "Casualties of War") with expert cinematographer Stephen H.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The weekend began as a war on two fronts for "Saving Private Ryan," battling the formidable Jamie Lee Curtis in the scare-fest "Halloween H20" on one side and Nicolas Cage in the thriller "Snake Eyes" on the other. Neither had the chops to unseat the champ and were left to duke it out for second place. A dead heat developed and, with Sunday business only estimated, the final outcome is still in doubt. For now it's "Snake Eyes" in front with an estimated $16.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2010 | By Walter Hamilton
The gig: Chief executive of Korn/Ferry International, a global executive-search firm based in Century City with 2,400 employees in 40 countries. Background: Born in Inglewood in 1961. Moved with his father to McPherson, Kan., at age 7 after his parents' divorce. Being raised in a small town taught him basic values, he says. "It's real America. It's a place where people cut their own grass. They paint their own houses. It's a hardworking part of America. . . . The world that I live in today couldn't be further away in so many respects from McPherson."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
There are a few things we should go over on the G.I. Joe front before you lock and load for the nearly two hours of supersonic warfare that is Stephen Sommers' "G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra." First the plot, and this will probably surprise you: Well-equipped bad guys want to take over the world; well-equipped good guys fight back. Cool futuristic machines, weapons and CGI make for lots of excellent exploding and imploding everywhere. You guess who wins. Next. Don't call them G.I. Joes.
SPORTS
March 1, 2009 | Mark Heisler
Remember the Suns and Mavericks panicking after the Lakers got Pau Gasol and breaking up their teams? Now it's the Cavaliers, swallowing hard as the once-thin arch-rival Celtics got Stephon Marbury and Mikki Moore. The Cavaliers had already passed up the biggest splash of all, walking away from Phoenix's Shaquille O'Neal, whom they could have gotten for J.J. Hickson and Wally Szczerbiak's expiring $13.8-million deal. Can we have a do-over on Shaq? Instead, the Cavaliers offered Ben Wallace's contract, which runs another year, and Sasha Pavlovic.
BOOKS
October 14, 2001 | MARCOS McPEEK VILLATORO, Marcos McPeek Villatoro is the author, most recently, of "Home Killings: A Romilia Chacon Mystery" and holds the Fletcher Jones-endowed chair in writing at Mount St. Mary's College, Los Angeles
Look in my laundry room cabinet here in Los Angeles and you'll find a Mason jar of clear alcohol. It's never been opened, but I know its smell, its taste. Shake the jar: Bubbles will form on top and separate clean down the middle like a zipper: a good batch. My father, born on Clinch Mountain in east Tennessee 81 years ago, gave it to me when I moved to California. His cousin Willie brewed it.
TRAVEL
October 31, 1999 | JIM BURNS, Jim Burns is an editor for the Los Angeles Times Syndicate
What a difference a decade makes, especially the 1990s in a place called Las Vegas. I knew it had changed, of course, since I last visited about eight years ago. After all, my last trip there was pre-Luxor, pre-Mandalay Bay and pre-Bellagio, not to mention the rest of the new resorts and casinos that have opened.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE
The weekend's two big arrivals "Halloween H20" and "Snake Eyes" both opened to commendable numbers but have vastly different profit potential. At $17 million, "Halloween" should almost break even after its domestic theatrical run, despite Miramax's traditional marketing overkill. Depending on how well it performs overseas, "Halloween" could be very profitable indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1998 | RICHARD NATALE SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The weekend began as a war on two fronts for "Saving Private Ryan," battling the formidable Jamie Lee Curtis in the scare-fest "Halloween H20" on one side and Nicolas Cage in the thriller "Snake Eyes" on the other. Neither had the chops to unseat the champ and were left to duke it out for second place. A dead heat developed and, with Sunday business only estimated, the final outcome is still in doubt. For now it's "Snake Eyes" in front with an estimated $16.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|