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Snake Pit

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2013 | Steve Lopez
L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca has no medical background, but he is the de facto administrator of what he calls "the nation's largest mental hospital. " "This is the system," he said, drawing a box on a piece of paper in his Monterey Park office last week. Judges, prosecutors and law enforcement officials each have a role in deciding what to do with someone who has a mental illness and is accused of a crime, Baca said. But they decide each case in isolation, missing a broader concern - thousands of sick people get locked up, with no coherent plan for helping them get better.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2013 | Steve Lopez
L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca has no medical background, but he is the de facto administrator of what he calls "the nation's largest mental hospital. " "This is the system," he said, drawing a box on a piece of paper in his Monterey Park office last week. Judges, prosecutors and law enforcement officials each have a role in deciding what to do with someone who has a mental illness and is accused of a crime, Baca said. But they decide each case in isolation, missing a broader concern - thousands of sick people get locked up, with no coherent plan for helping them get better.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
This was not a good week for the city treasurer's office. In four days of testimony before the Los Angeles City Council, three top-ranking bureaucrats told tales on one another, resurrecting old rivalries, accusing colleagues of incompetence and worse and detailing instances when policies were ignored by the very people who issued them.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
SWEETWATER, TEXAS - Kyndra Vaught caught everybody's attention when she arrived at the rattlesnake roundup here in West Texas last month wearing her crown and rhinestone cowboy boots. “Are you the snake charmer queen?” shouted a man selling rattlesnake head canes, porcelain rattlesnake “eggs” and snakeskin wallets. “You need a snake.” Kyndra, 17, let him drape an oversized plastic rattlesnake over her shoulders as she posed for photos. She had just been named Miss Snake Charmer the night before, part of the roundup pageant detailed in Friday's Los Angeles Times.
SPORTS
November 2, 1989
Nebraska middle guard Mike Murray treats opposing ballcarriers much like the garter snakes he chased as a youngster on Chicago's South Side. He hunts them down. Murray, who will help chase No. 2-ranked Colorado Saturday in Boulder, Colo., lists snake chasing as his favorite hobby. He started chasing the snakes when he was 4 but quit at 8, after he claimed he was bitten. "My friends and I used to catch them for fun when we were little," said Murray, a starter who has 14 tackles for the No.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plenty of highly paid lawyers in high-rise corner offices regard practicing law as the pits. But Denis Woychuk, whose workplace is a state mental hospital and whose clients are the criminally insane, is one lawyer who spends his days at the very bottom of a snake pit. Anyone who is tempted to lay out 20 bucks or more on a book by one of the O.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1987
I can just see the headline in the sports section in 1990. The Anaheim Rams play the Irwindale Raiders in the "Snake Pit." W.R. BARTON Glendora
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000
Your Feb. 8 editorial would have us believe that Hillary Clinton is now on her own in the snake pit of New York politics in her campaign for the Senate. Wrong. She has the entire power of her husband's federal apparatus to attack and discredit Rudolph Giuliani, and it will be used. It already began when Andrew Cuomo, secretary of Housing and Urban Development, seized control of $60 million in federal funds earmarked for New York and withheld from Giuliani. The scandal of the FBI files used by the Clintons in their strategy against Republican opponents is only a small indication of things to come.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
SWEETWATER, TEXAS - Kyndra Vaught caught everybody's attention when she arrived at the rattlesnake roundup here in West Texas last month wearing her crown and rhinestone cowboy boots. “Are you the snake charmer queen?” shouted a man selling rattlesnake head canes, porcelain rattlesnake “eggs” and snakeskin wallets. “You need a snake.” Kyndra, 17, let him drape an oversized plastic rattlesnake over her shoulders as she posed for photos. She had just been named Miss Snake Charmer the night before, part of the roundup pageant detailed in Friday's Los Angeles Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1992
I found your article on summer movies, "When Hollywood Feels the Heat" (May 24), truly sickening, and I don't blame writer David J. Fox. He was just doing what's expected. But the article is all money--what grosses are expected and whose career may be in jeopardy. Grosses were also important in the old studio days but they weren't all there was! It wasn't grosses alone that impelled Metro to do "Fury," Warners to do "Disraeli" and "The Life of Emile Zola," Frank Capra to give us Mr. Deeds, Mr. Smith and John Doe, or Zanuck to take profits from the Faye-Grable musicals and put them into "The Grapes of Wrath," "Gentleman's Agreement," "The Snake Pit" and "Pinky."
OPINION
June 25, 2006 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Forget long-suffering Uncle Sam, bloated capitalists or public trough-feeding porkers. Surely the most maligned creature ever wood-cut, etched or Photoshopped into cartoons is the snake. Since Ben Franklin graphically dissected the first hapless serpent -- in what is widely accepted as this nation's first editorial cartoon -- there's been no political problem, looming threat, sectarian rift or malfeasance that we haven't metaphorically ascribed to some scaly snake in the grass.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"Tough Luck," a taut and clever neo-noir, is well titled, for its hero, Archie (Norman Reedus), seems a born loser. A small-time grifter, he's fresh out of prison when he makes the mistake of cheating at a New Orleans casino, for which he is not merely thrown out but left beaten up and scarred. Drifting into a carnival set up in a town somewhere outside the city, Archie tries some more shady stuff, with thugs once again pouncing down upon him and depositing him with the carnival owner.
NEWS
January 6, 2002 | JOHN BALZAR
In our tumultuous times, there are smaller matters too. They burn with fury just beneath the headlines. This is one of them. It has caught my attention because the sensibilities of a group of children are involved. Their place in our society has been called into question, needlessly so. And tens of thousands of good-hearted people are alarmed, angry and downcast. It also caught my attention because I have a personal stake in the matter. Today, I write directly to those people who feel wronged, and indirectly to those many others who reflexively assume the worst from our government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2000
Your Feb. 8 editorial would have us believe that Hillary Clinton is now on her own in the snake pit of New York politics in her campaign for the Senate. Wrong. She has the entire power of her husband's federal apparatus to attack and discredit Rudolph Giuliani, and it will be used. It already began when Andrew Cuomo, secretary of Housing and Urban Development, seized control of $60 million in federal funds earmarked for New York and withheld from Giuliani. The scandal of the FBI files used by the Clintons in their strategy against Republican opponents is only a small indication of things to come.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plenty of highly paid lawyers in high-rise corner offices regard practicing law as the pits. But Denis Woychuk, whose workplace is a state mental hospital and whose clients are the criminally insane, is one lawyer who spends his days at the very bottom of a snake pit. Anyone who is tempted to lay out 20 bucks or more on a book by one of the O.J.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Plenty of highly paid lawyers in high-rise corner offices regard practicing law as the pits. But Denis Woychuk, whose workplace is a state mental hospital and whose clients are the criminally insane, is one lawyer who spends his days at the very bottom of a snake pit. Anyone who is tempted to lay out 20 bucks or more on a book by one of the O.J.
OPINION
June 25, 2006 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Forget long-suffering Uncle Sam, bloated capitalists or public trough-feeding porkers. Surely the most maligned creature ever wood-cut, etched or Photoshopped into cartoons is the snake. Since Ben Franklin graphically dissected the first hapless serpent -- in what is widely accepted as this nation's first editorial cartoon -- there's been no political problem, looming threat, sectarian rift or malfeasance that we haven't metaphorically ascribed to some scaly snake in the grass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1986 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
In the 1950s, Camarillo State Hospital, like most mental institutions of the day, was a massive warehouse for the mentally ill, its drab wards bulging with more than 7,000 patients, most of them committed for years or for life. Crowding was so severe that many patients were forced to sleep on mattresses in hallways and to wait in line to use bathrooms or exercise areas, veteran employees said. Little effort was spent on treatment.
NEWS
May 26, 1995 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes frequently about theater for The Times.
David Rabe may not be America's Dante, but his best plays--including his 1972 "In the Boom Boom Room," now in a revival at Ventura Court Theatre--constitute some of the most uncompromising descents into hell the American theater has served up. Two decades have not lessened "Boom Boom's" astringency and moral outrage, and director Richard Kantor's staging isn't trying to dress it up with '90s gloss. To the contrary.
NEWS
April 20, 1995
Several dozen furry critters got an extended lease on life when fire gutted a house in Santa Monica this week. Apparently destined to be breakfast, lunch or dinner for the tenants' collection of snakes, the three rabbits and 80-odd rats and mice were trucked off instead to an animal shelter, along with a boa constrictor, corn snake, king snake, two pythons and two lizards. Although Santa Monica and Los Angeles firefighters were able to extinguish the 4:20 p.m.
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