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Snake River

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NATIONAL
May 20, 2009 | Kim Murphy
For years, the federal government has struggled to find a way to operate the massive hydropower system on the Columbia and Snake rivers in the Pacific Northwest and still recover the endangered salmon that all too frequently are slaughtered at the massive dams as they make their way up and down the river.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Jane Engle
The seven-night “Legacy of Discovery” cruise takes you on a ride through history on the rivers of the Pacific Northwest. The newly refurbished, 88-passenger Legacy will travel round trip from Portland, Ore., on the Columbia and Snake rivers. Along the way, guests will encounter historians and other experts, experience onboard “living history” vignettes and visit museums, historic forts and wineries. Highlights include the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Multnomah Falls, transit through eight locks, jetboating into Hells Canyon and a private winery tour.
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NATIONAL
June 3, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A raft that was part of a scenic float trip on the Snake River overturned Friday in Grand Teton National Park. Three people drowned; 10 others who were in the raft were rescued, park officials said. Park spokeswoman Joan Anzelmo said two women and a man died. She declined to release their names or hometowns, saying the park service was still trying to notify their families. She said the victims were not locals. Thirteen people, including the boatman from Grand Teton Lodge Co.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Row Adventures based in Idaho offers an early season discount on Snake River trips that zip through Hells Canyon, North America's deepest river gorge. Whitewater rapids and luxury camping are the calling cards for four- to six-day trips that are on sale for adults and children until Monday. The deal: The sale applies to trips of at least four days on selected Snake River trips this spring and summer. Adults take $200 off the price; children 16 and younger take $200 off four-day trips and $300 off five- and six-day trips.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | TED CILWICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here in the heart of potato country, where the swift-flowing Snake River generates cheap electricity, people were both amused and scornful as they brushed aside Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn's recent proposal to channel river water to parched Southern California. Among themselves, though, Idahoans bicker fiercely over use of the Snake, which was named for its meandering 1,038-mile course.
OPINION
July 6, 2009 | Paul VanDevelder, Paul VanDevelder is the author of "Savages and Scoundrels: The Untold Story of America's Road to Empire Through Indian Territory."
If ever there were a story that foreshadowed the political and legal Waterloos that loom in seeking solutions to climate change, surely that cautionary tale is the one about the Columbia and Snake rivers' salmon and their imminent extinction. And like most stories about endangered species or environmental threats, this one is not only about fish and rivers -- it's about us.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2006 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Nearly everything about "Snake River," the centerpiece of an absorbing but frustrating show at the Gallery at REDCAT, involves a split, a duality. The two-channel video was made by two artists, Charles Gaines and Edgar Arceneaux, both based in Los Angeles. It was supported and exhibited through the joint effort of two institutions, REDCAT and the Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, and is accompanied by a two-volume catalog due out in November.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river workhorse begins here in the northern Idaho farm belt, slicing a canyon through the rolling grasslands of the most productive wheat fields in the nation. Here, the Snake River takes 722,000 tons a year of wheat and barley on its back and carries it down through the confluence with the Columbia River and on to the sea--465 miles of what was once the wildest river system in the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | JOHN HUGHES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Snake River has quietly meandered through the hills and farms of southeastern Washington state for generations, lacking the fame of the Mississippi, the Rio Grande or the Pacific Northwest's most famous river, the Columbia. But that is changing. "Saving" the Snake has become a battle cry from Washington, D.C., to grass-roots environmental offices from coast to coast. It's the subject of strategy sessions and full-page national newspaper ads.
OPINION
August 12, 2009
Hauling truckloads of hitchhiking juvenile salmon around dams is one silly way to save a species. And it doesn't work either. As four dams were built along the lower Snake River in southeastern Washington from the late 1950s to early 1970s, it took only a few years for the river's healthy salmon populations to plummet. By the mid-1990s, the populations of four types of salmon had been declared endangered or threatened. The federal expenditure of $8 billion since then for fish ladders, hatcheries, habitat restoration and, yes, trucks and barges to transport the salmon around the dams has not restored the fish.
TRAVEL
September 10, 2011
In southeast Idaho, the Blue Heron Inn offers stunning views of the Snake River and a gourmet breakfast. Innkeepers Dave and Claudia Klingler can suggest many nearby activities. Seven rooms, from $109. Blue Heron Inn, 706 N. Yellowstone Highway, Rigby; (208) 745-9922, http://www.idahoblueheron.com Judi Hills Valencia
TRAVEL
August 8, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Rolling through Jackson Hole on the way into Grand Teton National Park for the first time, I spotted a boy on the cycle path alongside the road. His family was a few yards behind him, and the Tetons were off to his left, their ragged, snowy peaks jutting above the Snake River and miles of meadow. The boy was taking it all in, his helmeted head tilted back. His legs were pumping. And his arms were off the handlebars, thrown out in scarecrow fashion. He was the King of the World, astride a shiny bike instead of a doomed ocean liner.
OPINION
March 12, 2010
Even among those who seek to protect wildlife above all, there are moments of great conflict. One of those moments is playing out near Portland, Ore., as sea lions gorge on endangered chinook salmon that gather at the base of the Bonneville Dam, preparing to make their way up the fish ladders to spawn. Last week and this, wildlife officials have killed six of the most incorrigible of the animals, which have refused to be dissuaded by noise, rubber bullets or other harassing techniques.
OPINION
January 24, 2010 | By Carl Safina
Recently, a photograph made its way to me on the Internet: In a surging Alaskan stream, a grizzly bear stands with a salmon in its jaws, and in the shallows, a wolf -- keeping its distance -- also hoists a thrashing salmon. Your eye goes to the bear, then the wolf. But the salmon convened the meeting. Without the salmon, you'd see only water. When salmon return from the sea, their bodies are the ocean made flesh. Their tails propel ocean nutrients upstream and into forests, rivers and range lands, where they benefit hundreds of other species.
OPINION
August 12, 2009
Hauling truckloads of hitchhiking juvenile salmon around dams is one silly way to save a species. And it doesn't work either. As four dams were built along the lower Snake River in southeastern Washington from the late 1950s to early 1970s, it took only a few years for the river's healthy salmon populations to plummet. By the mid-1990s, the populations of four types of salmon had been declared endangered or threatened. The federal expenditure of $8 billion since then for fish ladders, hatcheries, habitat restoration and, yes, trucks and barges to transport the salmon around the dams has not restored the fish.
OPINION
July 6, 2009 | Paul VanDevelder, Paul VanDevelder is the author of "Savages and Scoundrels: The Untold Story of America's Road to Empire Through Indian Territory."
If ever there were a story that foreshadowed the political and legal Waterloos that loom in seeking solutions to climate change, surely that cautionary tale is the one about the Columbia and Snake rivers' salmon and their imminent extinction. And like most stories about endangered species or environmental threats, this one is not only about fish and rivers -- it's about us.
NEWS
May 14, 2000 | JOHN HUGHES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The National Marine Fisheries Service is expected to say this month that four Snake River dams should remain standing for at least another five or 10 years. After that, if not enough progress has been made in recovering salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act, the dams should be breached, the agency is expected to say. The announcement is expected to be included in the details of the federal government's most comprehensive plan yet for recovering salmon in the Columbia Basin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2000 | JOHN HUGHES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The National Marine Fisheries Service is expected to say this month that four Snake River dams should remain standing for at least another five or 10 years. After that, if not enough progress has been made in recovering salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act, the dams should be breached, the agency is expected to say. The announcement is expected to be included in the details of the federal government's most comprehensive plan yet for recovering salmon in the Columbia Basin.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2009 | Kim Murphy
For years, the federal government has struggled to find a way to operate the massive hydropower system on the Columbia and Snake rivers in the Pacific Northwest and still recover the endangered salmon that all too frequently are slaughtered at the massive dams as they make their way up and down the river.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2006 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Nearly everything about "Snake River," the centerpiece of an absorbing but frustrating show at the Gallery at REDCAT, involves a split, a duality. The two-channel video was made by two artists, Charles Gaines and Edgar Arceneaux, both based in Los Angeles. It was supported and exhibited through the joint effort of two institutions, REDCAT and the Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, and is accompanied by a two-volume catalog due out in November.
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