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BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | Greg Miller
San Francisco-based Snap, the fledgling Internet portal site owned by NBC and CNet Inc., plans to introduce an online directory that will cater to people with high-speed connections to the Internet. The Cyclone service will showcase multimedia content such as video and audio, which clog ordinary online connections but move swiftly over increasingly popular high-speed data lines.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 2010 | By Steve Johnson and Brandon Bailey
From Hewlett-Packard and Cisco Systems to Intel and Oracle, some of Silicon Valley's largest companies charged out of the recession with fat bankrolls and a determination to spend whatever it takes this year to reshape their businesses around emerging technologies. If the buying binge continues, 2010 could rank among the biggest for billion-dollar deals in a decade. Tech companies already have announced six purchases worth at least $1 billion so far this year, according to the 451 Group, which has compiled such data since 2002.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 2010 | By Steve Johnson and Brandon Bailey
From Hewlett-Packard and Cisco Systems to Intel and Oracle, some of Silicon Valley's largest companies charged out of the recession with fat bankrolls and a determination to spend whatever it takes this year to reshape their businesses around emerging technologies. If the buying binge continues, 2010 could rank among the biggest for billion-dollar deals in a decade. Tech companies already have announced six purchases worth at least $1 billion so far this year, according to the 451 Group, which has compiled such data since 2002.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1999 | Greg Miller
San Francisco-based Snap, the fledgling Internet portal site owned by NBC and CNet Inc., plans to introduce an online directory that will cater to people with high-speed connections to the Internet. The Cyclone service will showcase multimedia content such as video and audio, which clog ordinary online connections but move swiftly over increasingly popular high-speed data lines.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1998 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the broadcasters represented on Wednesday's opening panel of the cable industry's annual show in Anaheim agreed that cable companies and consumers will be the biggest winners from the changing landscape of television. Barry Diller, chief executive of USA Networks Inc., said to continue to pay for quality programming for prime time, the networks will have to distribute shows in ways other than through traditional broadcast stations. Robert Wright, the chief executive of NBC Inc.
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