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WORLD
July 13, 2013 | By Devorah Lauter
PARIS - A problem with a steel clip appears to have caused the French train accident Friday that resulted in at least six deaths, according to the French rail company SNCF. The clip, located on a switch some 200 yards from a train station, “broke away, became detached and came out of its housing,” said Pierre Izard, SNCF's general manager for infrastructure. The switch enables trains to change tracks. That likely led the intercity train bound from Paris to Limoges to derail outside the Bretigny-sur-Orge train station, about 12 miles south of the capital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Frederick N. Rasmussen
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Pikesville, Md. He was 93. Bretholz played a leading role in a campaign to require SNCF, the French railway system that historians have said conveyed 76,000 people to Nazi camps, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors....
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OPINION
November 20, 2010
The recent apology by SNCF, the French national railway, for transporting 76,000 Jews to Germany, where they were sent on to the Nazi death camps, doesn't save any lives or compensate any survivors. What's more, it comes about 65 years late, at a time when most of those with firsthand memories of the Holocaust have died. Particularly distressing is the fact that the apology was apparently not prompted by regret. Rather, it seems to have been spurred by the company's desire to win multibillion-dollar high-speed rail contracts in California and Florida, contracts that were in jeopardy because of stiff resistance from survivors of the deportations and the families of those who died.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Orient-Express, the name long associated with the ultimate train excursion, is about to expire. Starting March 10, the rail empire that has grown to include hotels, beach resorts, restaurants and river cruises will go by the name Belmond. Say what? The Orient-Express website still says: "There's often more to a name than meets the eye. We're fortunate that ours has symbolised the world's most romantic railway journey for over a century. " But apparently that century-old cachet has ended.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Seventy-two years after Nazis began deporting French Jews to concentration camps, the French government is negotiating to pay reparations for the first time to several hundred Holocaust survivors now living in the U.S. who survived unspeakable conditions while being transported in government-owned rail cars and in the death camps at the end of the line. Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said in an interview Friday that the French government entered into formal talks Feb. 6 and appeared to be intent on wrapping up negotiations by the end of the year.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Orient-Express, the name long associated with the ultimate train excursion, is about to expire. Starting March 10, the rail empire that has grown to include hotels, beach resorts, restaurants and river cruises will go by the name Belmond. Say what? The Orient-Express website still says: "There's often more to a name than meets the eye. We're fortunate that ours has symbolised the world's most romantic railway journey for over a century. " But apparently that century-old cachet has ended.
WORLD
July 12, 2013 | By Devorah Lauter
PARIS - A train departing from Paris at the start of the summer holiday season derailed on Friday evening 12 miles south of the French capital, killing at least six people and seriously injuring 22 others, in what was being described as one of the worst train accidents the country has seen in recent years. About 370 passengers were on the train that departed from the Gare d'Austerlitz in Paris, headed toward Limoges in the center of France, when the third and fourth cars derailed soon after 5 p.m. in the station at Bretigny-sur-Orge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Martha Groves
For Chasten Bowen, news that France is negotiating with the U.S. to pay reparations to Holocaust survivors who were transported on French rail cars to Nazi concentration camps during World War II comes too late. “I'm just about ready to leave this world,” said the 89-year-old Anaheim resident. “If there's money available, there are others who need it worse than I do.” Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said Friday that the French government entered into formal talks with the U.S. State Department on Feb. 6 regarding reparations and hopes to wrap up an agreement by the end of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | Frederick N. Rasmussen
Leo Bretholz, a Holocaust survivor who became a major voice in the campaign to gain reparations from companies that transported victims to concentration camps during World War II, died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Pikesville, Md. He was 93. Bretholz played a leading role in a campaign to require SNCF, the French railway system that historians have said conveyed 76,000 people to Nazi camps, to pay reparations to U.S. Holocaust survivors....
OPINION
December 16, 2013 | By Stuart Flashman
Two court decisions have blocked the California High-Speed Rail Authority from issuing more than $8 billion in bonds and from using bond funds on construction until it fixes its funding plan. Now what? The authority says it will move forward using federal funds. But as one of the attorneys who successfully challenged the project, I can tell you that, on its present track, the future looks bleak. A series of shortsighted political decisions has left the state's high-speed rail system with an unworkable plan that's doomed to failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | By Martha Groves
For Chasten Bowen, news that France is negotiating with the U.S. to pay reparations to Holocaust survivors who were transported on French rail cars to Nazi concentration camps during World War II comes too late. “I'm just about ready to leave this world,” said the 89-year-old Anaheim resident. “If there's money available, there are others who need it worse than I do.” Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said Friday that the French government entered into formal talks with the U.S. State Department on Feb. 6 regarding reparations and hopes to wrap up an agreement by the end of the year.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Seventy-two years after Nazis began deporting French Jews to concentration camps, the French government is negotiating to pay reparations for the first time to several hundred Holocaust survivors now living in the U.S. who survived unspeakable conditions while being transported in government-owned rail cars and in the death camps at the end of the line. Stuart Eizenstat, a Washington lawyer who advises the State Department on Holocaust issues, said in an interview Friday that the French government entered into formal talks Feb. 6 and appeared to be intent on wrapping up negotiations by the end of the year.
OPINION
December 16, 2013 | By Stuart Flashman
Two court decisions have blocked the California High-Speed Rail Authority from issuing more than $8 billion in bonds and from using bond funds on construction until it fixes its funding plan. Now what? The authority says it will move forward using federal funds. But as one of the attorneys who successfully challenged the project, I can tell you that, on its present track, the future looks bleak. A series of shortsighted political decisions has left the state's high-speed rail system with an unworkable plan that's doomed to failure.
WORLD
July 13, 2013 | By Devorah Lauter
PARIS - A problem with a steel clip appears to have caused the French train accident Friday that resulted in at least six deaths, according to the French rail company SNCF. The clip, located on a switch some 200 yards from a train station, “broke away, became detached and came out of its housing,” said Pierre Izard, SNCF's general manager for infrastructure. The switch enables trains to change tracks. That likely led the intercity train bound from Paris to Limoges to derail outside the Bretigny-sur-Orge train station, about 12 miles south of the capital.
WORLD
July 12, 2013 | By Devorah Lauter
PARIS - A train departing from Paris at the start of the summer holiday season derailed on Friday evening 12 miles south of the French capital, killing at least six people and seriously injuring 22 others, in what was being described as one of the worst train accidents the country has seen in recent years. About 370 passengers were on the train that departed from the Gare d'Austerlitz in Paris, headed toward Limoges in the center of France, when the third and fourth cars derailed soon after 5 p.m. in the station at Bretigny-sur-Orge.
OPINION
November 20, 2010
The recent apology by SNCF, the French national railway, for transporting 76,000 Jews to Germany, where they were sent on to the Nazi death camps, doesn't save any lives or compensate any survivors. What's more, it comes about 65 years late, at a time when most of those with firsthand memories of the Holocaust have died. Particularly distressing is the fact that the apology was apparently not prompted by regret. Rather, it seems to have been spurred by the company's desire to win multibillion-dollar high-speed rail contracts in California and Florida, contracts that were in jeopardy because of stiff resistance from survivors of the deportations and the families of those who died.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | From Times wire services
France might consider subsidizing a high-speed rail link in Britain in order to ensure that the Channel Tunnel is a success, the French state-owned railway SNCF said today. A spokesman said SNCF is prepared to consider financial support for the building of the 68-mile upgraded line between London and the British start of the undersea tunnel at the southeast town of Folkestone. The line is vital in more than halving the rail passenger travel time between London and Paris to 2 1/2 hours.
WORLD
May 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
French Railway workers began a 36-hour strike, which state rail operator SNCF expected would disrupt commuter service into Paris. Trade unions called the stoppage to protest planned government-backed job cuts. In the greater Paris region, service would be reduced by almost half, SNCF said. About 70% of express intercity trains would run, and international Thalys and Eurostar trains were expected to run as normal.
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