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NEWS
February 22, 1993
Sam Snead was 61 in 1974 and the sentimental favorite at Riviera. Snead had won twice at Riviera, most recently in 1950. He shot a 66 in the third round for a share of the lead with Dave Stockton, John Mahaffey and Tom Weiskopf, players who hadn't even been born when Snead was the tour's money leader in 1938. On Sunday, Stockton pulled in front of Snead, but found himself only one stroke ahead after Snead sank a long birdie putt on the 17 hole.
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SPORTS
March 26, 2013 | By Brian Schmitz
ORLANDO, Fla. — No matter what day it is, it's always Sunday to Tiger Woods when he's sniffing a title. Woods won the Arnold Palmer Invitational on Monday after storms had delayed the final round — but not Woods' climb back to the golfing mountaintop. "I think he plays every shot like he plays them on Sunday," said Justin Rose, the runner-up. Woods shot a two-under-par 70 for a 13-under 275 total to repeat his title, beating Rose by two shots and four third-place finishers by five.
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SPORTS
November 19, 1988
Ordinarily when I start an article, I finish it, but Thomas Bonk's description (Nov. 14) of the obscene amounts of money on the line in the Nabisco golf tournament was an exception. Ol' Sam Snead, who in his prime could have taken any of these guys, earned the money prize one year with $30,000. MATT MILLER Palm Springs
SPORTS
September 7, 2009 | Associated Press
Jevan Snead recovered from a poor start to throw for two touchdowns and Dexter McCluster scored twice to lead No. 8 Mississippi to a 45-14 win over host Memphis on Sunday. Snead struggled for three quarters before breaking open a close game with scoring passes of 17 and 18 yards to McCluster and Markeith Summers . Brandon Bolden rushed for 71 yards in nine carries, scored one touchdown and set up another with a 28-yard run. It was the seventh straight win for the Rebels (1-0)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987
Regarding James A. Snead's commentary on Walt Disney's "Song of the South" (Calendar, Dec. 27), I don't dispute his claim that the film romanticizes a vision of plantation life that never was. However, his charge of untold "social and psychological damage done by the racial stereotypes" of the picture reveals a faulty analysis. Snead fails to acknowledge the real symbolism of Uncle Remus in the film. Far from being an Uncle Tom, he emerges as the only truly perceptive and human figure on the screen.
SPORTS
July 24, 2004
Does Thomas Bonk work for The Times or Tiger Woods' public relations firm? In the British Open, Woods was never in contention, yet Bonk writes that Hamilton held off Els, Mickelson and Woods. Bonk has written that a tournament without Woods is not worth watching, or that when Woods tees it up, the rest are playing for second place. Players like Snead, Hogan, Palmer and Nicklaus were great to watch. There was golf before Woods and there will be golf when Woods is just a memory.
SPORTS
October 16, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Mark O'Meara, a non-winner on the PGA Tour for two seasons, shot a nine-under-par 63 Thursday and took a two-shot lead over J.C. Snead in the first round of the $600,000 Walt Disney World golf tournament at Lake Buena Vista, Fla. O'Meara and Snead both played Lake Buena Vista, at 6,706 yards the shortest and easiest of the three resort courses used for the first three rounds of this event. At 66 were Andy Magee, Bobby Wadkins, Steve Pate and Jim Carter. All played at Lake Buena Vista.
SPORTS
July 28, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Ben Crenshaw, showing he is fully recovered from an illness that almost ended his pro golf career, shot a final-round 68 Sunday to win the $500,000 Buick Open with an 18-under-par score of 270 at Grand Blanc, Mich. Crenshaw, who hadn't won since the 1984 Masters, finished one stroke ahead of hard-charging J.C. Snead and Doug Tewell to earn $90,000 and the use of a Buick for one year. Crenshaw's biggest test came on No. 13, a 490-yard, par-5.
SPORTS
June 9, 1985 | SHAV GLICK
The way Jack Nicklaus looks at it, a man should still be in his prime when he's in his 40s. The Golden Bear is 45, and this week he'll be right where he has been at this time for the last 25 years, playing in the United States Open. Even though Nicklaus hasn't won the Open since 1980 and has won only one tournament in the last three years, his enthusiasm isn't blunted as he prepares to challenge Thursday for a record fifth national championship.
SPORTS
April 8, 1998 | Associated Press
Three-time Masters champion Sam Snead was hospitalized Tuesday, missing the Masters champions dinner, after he reportedly suffered a mini-stroke, the Augusta Chronicle reported. Snead, 85, was listed in fair condition late Tuesday at Augusta's University Hospital, nursing supervisor Bobbie Clark said. He was being held in a 24-hour observation room at the hospital. Snead, who played his first Masters in 1937, won the tournament in 1949, 1952 and 1954.
NEWS
February 21, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Robert W. Welkos and Elizabeth Snead
PEAKING OH YEAH, AND MY WIFE: The new "Thank-You Cam" backstage allows winners to read their mandatory Tinseltown gratitude lists in the privacy of the Internet. But will Brad Grey still get his props on national TV? CLIMBING RED-CARPET MAKEOVER: Vogue's Andre Leon Talley provides red-carpet fashion commentary. The obvious sequel to "The Devil Wears Prada." HOPE THERE'S A WATCH IN HER SWAG BAG: The last time Laura Ziskin produced, the show clocked in at 4 hours and 23 minutes.
SPORTS
October 1, 2006 | Lonnie White; Diane Pucin, From Times Staff Reports
Although junior William Snead did not catch any passes against Stanford, he was used at tight end for the first time in his college career in the hope of bolstering UCLA's offense. With J.J. Hair not in uniform because of a hip injury and Tyler Holland slowed because of a hamstring injury, Snead -- a backup defensive end for the first three games -- was switched to offense this week. "I think he's done a nice job," UCLA Coach Karl Dorrell said about Snead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2006
Golfer Ben Hogan, nicknamed "Bantam Ben" because of his small size (145 pounds) and called the "Hawk" by fellow players because of the way he studied a course, matched Sam Snead shot-for-shot on the last day of the Los Angeles Open. Hogan was making his miraculous comeback from a near-fatal automobile accident and was leading when he finished his final round at the Riviera Country Club, a course that became known as Hogan's Alley. Snead beat Hogan in a week-delayed 18-hole playoff, 72 to 76.
SPORTS
October 5, 2005 | Lonnie White, Times Staff Writer
Because of defensive end Nikola Dragovic's season-ending knee injury, UCLA redshirt sophomore William Snead will make his first career start on Saturday against California, the team he followed growing up in Oakland. But to Snead, the importance of this week's game to the Bruins means much more than his personal ties with the Bears. "This is really a big game for me not just because it's against the team closest from where I'm from," said Snead, a three-sport standout at Skyline High.
SPORTS
June 6, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Here's a contest a lot of golfers could qualify for: World's Worst Swing. The Golf Channel began asking for tape submissions in January, and today at 4:30 p.m. the winner will be announced on the air. A finalist is Brian Weir, 36, of Valencia, a major in the Air Force. So how bad is Weir's swing? He said he has had a lesson only twice during the 14 years he has been playing golf, and the first time his instructor saw his swing, he said, "Don't do that again.
SPORTS
July 24, 2004
Does Thomas Bonk work for The Times or Tiger Woods' public relations firm? In the British Open, Woods was never in contention, yet Bonk writes that Hamilton held off Els, Mickelson and Woods. Bonk has written that a tournament without Woods is not worth watching, or that when Woods tees it up, the rest are playing for second place. Players like Snead, Hogan, Palmer and Nicklaus were great to watch. There was golf before Woods and there will be golf when Woods is just a memory.
SPORTS
April 11, 1987
In a ceremonial start, Gene Sarazen, Byron Nelson and Sam Snead were the first to tee off in the Masters. Sarazen, at 85, is the oldest former winner, and his double eagle in 1935 is still the most famous shot in the tournament's history. Nelson was celebrating the 50th anniversary of his Masters victory. Why was Snead included in the threesome? "Because," someone observed, "he's Sam Snead."
SPORTS
October 1, 2006 | Lonnie White; Diane Pucin, From Times Staff Reports
Although junior William Snead did not catch any passes against Stanford, he was used at tight end for the first time in his college career in the hope of bolstering UCLA's offense. With J.J. Hair not in uniform because of a hip injury and Tyler Holland slowed because of a hamstring injury, Snead -- a backup defensive end for the first three games -- was switched to offense this week. "I think he's done a nice job," UCLA Coach Karl Dorrell said about Snead.
SPORTS
February 20, 2003 | Michael Arkush, Special to The Times
No matter the venue -- Riviera Country Club, Rancho Park Golf Club or Valencia Country Club -- the Los Angeles Open has staged some of the game's most dramatic tournaments. Following is a brief look at 10 memorable post-World War II duels: * 1950: Sam Snead beats Ben Hogan in 18-hole playoff. Equally triumphant was Hogan, making his first tournament appearance since his near-fatal 1949 car accident.
SPORTS
March 4, 2001 | MICHAEL ITAGAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.C. Snead and Walter Hall might not be in the heat of contention after Saturday's second round of the Toshiba Senior Classic at Newport Beach Country Club, but they're still enjoying themselves. After a delicate pitch from off the green at No. 16, a 437-yard par four, Snead made a slippery, eight-foot downhill putt to save par. Hall then plucked the ball out of the hole for Snead.
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