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SPORTS
October 3, 1987
Slobodan Zivojinovic? That's the sound I make when I sneeze. DAVID KOLPACOFF El Cajon
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HEALTH
October 11, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
Fall is in the air and so, alas, are zillions of grains of weed pollen, sailing hither and yon, high and low, far and wide. These guarantee an abundance of new little weeds next year - and an abundance of sniffy, sneezy, wheezy people right now, namely those unfortunate souls who have an allergy to pollen. Pollen allergy is often called "hay fever," although it doesn't cause fever and its only connection with hay is that it inflicts its woes at hay-harvesting time. The name "seasonal allergic rhinitis" - where "rhinitis" refers to an inflamed nose - is more accurate if less evocative.
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SPORTS
November 23, 1986 | Grahame L. Jones
A golfer with allergies? Nothing unusual there. After all, there are about as many of the former as there are of the latter. But a professional golfer who's allergic to-- grass? Yes, grass, the same stuff usually found covering the tees and the fairways and, heaven forbid, even the greens on golf courses from Kaanapali to Cape Cod.
SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Josh Hamilton said he has changed sinus medication and is scheduled to be tested for allergies, but he wanted to make one thing about his weakened condition perfectly clear. "This has absolutely nothing to do with my .200 batting average," he said. The Angels limited Hamilton to designated hitter Tuesday, one day after the right fielder came out of a game with what Manager Mike Scioscia called dizziness. Hamilton said he has had sinus and throat discomfort for about 10 days and said he hoped a change in medication would help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2009 | Seema Mehta
The start of the school year will undoubtedly bring a rise in H1N1 infections, health and education officials said Friday as they urged parents to practice such precautionary measures with their children as hand-washing and the "Dracula sneeze." Officials also said parents should not panic and keep healthy children home once flu breaks out on campuses. "I want to make sure parents are not afraid to send their children to school if they are well," said Dr. Jonathan Fielding, Los Angeles County's health officer.
OPINION
August 27, 2004
Re "Put the Squeeze on Lemon Teachers," Aug. 22: Steve Lopez writes that on any given day 7% of teachers call in sick. Not to gross you out, Mr. Lopez, but many parents send their children to school when they are sick because of a lack of day care or planning. In turn, these students cough and sneeze and wipe things in strange places. We don't work in a sterile environment. Have you ever seen the children's bathrooms? Soap? Towels? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Same with the faculty bathrooms.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN
We are waiting for the chickenpox. From what we understand, these pox are underhanded, duplicitous, incapable of delivering a clear message like a straightforward sneeze. They sneak up on you, we have heard, plotting silently under your very own roof, dividing like mad and trying to conquer the little bodies of your loved ones until finally they are brave enough to come out, en masse. Because these pox are chicken, of course, yellow-bellied in the worst possible way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1998
In response to Franklin Zimring's commentary, "Thank You for Not Sneezing" (Feb. 1), I would like to recommend that we adopt the Japanese custom of bowing a greeting rather than shaking our coughed-in, sneezed-in hands. Other cultures see us as barbarians for wearing our street-dirty shoes into homes where our babies crawl around. If we can't make these big changes, could we at least carry a handkerchief? SUSAN SOTO-CAMPOS Los Angeles
SCIENCE
September 5, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
President Kennedy's Addison's disease, which came to light only after his election in 1960, was most likely caused by a rare autoimmune disease, according to a Navy doctor who reviewed Kennedy's medical records. The disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2, or APS 2, also caused Kennedy's hypothyroidism, according to a report published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Hard though it is to believe these days -- when a celebrity's smallest sneeze is analyzed -- Kennedy's family and advisors were able to keep his medical history virtually secret.
MAGAZINE
March 29, 1987
Kevles states that pet owners can build up a tolerance to their animals but can suffer an acute allergic reaction when separated from their pet. Actually, the opposite is true. Persons who are allergic to their pets learn to live with their symptoms and can actually become well during an extended separation. Also, there is no evidence that the Rex cat provokes fewer allergic reactions than other breeds. Lewis J. Kanter MD Allergy Care Center Camarillo
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
If you're counting on a hypoallergenic dog to keep the household free from sneeze-inducing allergens--don't. Levels of dog allergens don't appear to be very different in houses with hypoallergenic dogs than in those with other dogs, according to new research. So don’t let those cute names fool you—labradoodles, cockapoos and other breeds thought to be good for dog lovers suffering from allergies don’t necessarily make better best friends. Unlike previous studies, researchers didn’t inspect dander directly from dog hair.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2009 | Hugo Martin
Television news shows and newspaper headlines scream about the potential dangers of H1N1, also known as swine flu, and there you are, contemplating a trip for the upcoming holidays. So, you ask yourself: Am I safe from airborne germs in the confined cabin of a crowded passenger jet? The topic of air quality on airplanes has come up repeatedly this year, most noticeably when Vice President Joe Biden told a television audience last spring that he was advising family members to avoid confined spaces such as airplanes for fear of contracting the flu from a sneezing passenger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2009 | Seema Mehta
The start of the school year will undoubtedly bring a rise in H1N1 infections, health and education officials said Friday as they urged parents to practice such precautionary measures with their children as hand-washing and the "Dracula sneeze." Officials also said parents should not panic and keep healthy children home once flu breaks out on campuses. "I want to make sure parents are not afraid to send their children to school if they are well," said Dr. Jonathan Fielding, Los Angeles County's health officer.
OPINION
May 4, 2009 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ
When tragedy strikes, people are supposed to band together and find strength in numbers, right? When the well-being of your community is threatened, it's important to look out for your neighbors and lend a hand to those in need, no? Well, that's what many of us may have thought before all the hysteria about the looming swine flu pandemic.
OPINION
April 29, 2009 | Wendy Orent, Wendy Orent is the author of "Plague: The Mysterious Past and Terrifying Future of the World's Most Dangerous Disease."
The recent swine flu outbreak has caused worldwide anxiety. But there's one thing we don't need to be anxious about: We are not facing a pandemic. As flu virologists have always defined them, pandemics involve totally new viruses to which no one has any immunity, allowing them to spread rapidly and destructively.
OPINION
November 13, 2008 | ROSA BROOKS
So enough about the struggling middle class. In this global financial crisis, how are the really rich holding up? To find out, I spent several days in Dubai, the most populous city in the United Arab Emirates and world capital of conspicuous consumption. So far, the ultra-rich are bearing up well. If the scene at Dubai's luxury Burj al Arab hotel is anything to go by, there's still robust demand for hotel rooms that start at about $1,500 a night and bikinis that cost $800.
OPINION
October 7, 2006 | MEGHAN DAUM
IT IS A TRUTH universally acknowledged that cats make some people sick. As a person who would no sooner pet a cat than stick her hand in a tree shredder, I consider this a law of nature. But it seems that cats may be going nature one better. Starting early next year, a San Diego company called Allerca will introduce the world's first hypoallergenic cat.
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