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Snelling Personnel Services

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BUSINESS
May 26, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA
How desperate are businesses for workers? The temporary services agency Snelling Personnel Services is holding a sweepstakes for temps that refer new job candidates to the agency. Each referral earns one entry in the contest. Prizes include a new Mazda Miata and Dodge truck, free groceries for a year, $100 gift certificates, and prepaid phone cards. "The more qualified applicants they refer, the more chances they have to win," says Madeline Tighe, manager of Snelling's Costa Mesa office.
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BUSINESS
May 26, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA
How desperate are businesses for workers? The temporary services agency Snelling Personnel Services is holding a sweepstakes for temps that refer new job candidates to the agency. Each referral earns one entry in the contest. Prizes include a new Mazda Miata and Dodge truck, free groceries for a year, $100 gift certificates, and prepaid phone cards. "The more qualified applicants they refer, the more chances they have to win," says Madeline Tighe, manager of Snelling's Costa Mesa office.
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NEWS
January 13, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite California's energy crunch and the emerging national slowdown, the state's economy kept growing vigorously in December, adding a surprising 53,100 jobs and cutting the unemployment rate to 4.6%. The decline in joblessness, down from 4.8% in November, brought the unemployment rate back to the lowest level in the state's 7 1/2-year expansion and equaled a 30-year low for California. Unemployment also was 4.6% last February.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | LESLIE EARNEST and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's jobless rate fell to a historic low of 2% last month, state officials said Friday, providing strong evidence the local labor market remains vigorous despite an emerging economic slowdown. "That's a real record for us, going back all the way to the 1940s," said Ann Marshall, the Employment Development Department's labor market analyst in Orange County. "The size of our labor force has peaked," she added, referring to the more than 1.
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