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SPORTS
May 31, 2008
Helene Elliott's recent columns on the NHL have been refreshing changes from the nattering nabobs of negativism that now pass for sportswriters at the Los Angeles Times. She presents the facts and a few concise comments; no name calling, no snide remarks. Dave Walters Del Mar
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 10, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
SOCHI, Russia - The Canadian guy with bulging tattooed biceps is pumping his fist and glaring. Two Norwegian guys with colorfully checkered pants are hunched over and shimmying. A Swiss woman is screaming at her friends with a mouth so wide one can examine her pierced tongue. This is not some funky corner bar at the Olympic village or some hip Olympic reality show. This is cool, cool curling. Go ahead, laugh, roll those eyes, make those jokes like the one bellowed by the Russian reporter outside the Ice Cube Curling Center on Monday night.
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SPORTS
January 10, 1987
About Richard Hoffer's article, "Own a Piece of USC for a Mere $250,000" (Dec. 29), many of us believe it's great that a private university continues to fund its own expenses, and not grovel for public (yours included) tax funds. The tenor of his writing, though, is so snide one would think it is wrong to help thyself. Why so snide? Is it because your paper finds it so fashionable to demean USC every chance? Is it because his editor delights in putting it to us? Or is it simply because he is stuck in the smart-aleck school of journalism?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008 | Howard Rosenberg, Special to The Times
Former Times Television Critic Howard Rosenberg, a Pulitzer Prize winner for criticism in 1985, will be writing occasional commentaries about news on television and the Internet. -- It seems like a couple of centuries since His Holiness Pope Walter reigned as God's deputy on the airwaves. Even longer if you think about leave-'em-laughing funnyman Keith Olbermann.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1986
A couple of thoughts on yet another in a long line of relentlessly snide columns by Al Martinez. So, Al, you're stuck on a spur track in Chatsworth? Try doing some real work for a change; maybe some time in a factory, a few hours in the fields or maybe flip some burgers at a Carl's Jr. Stick it in your ear, big Al. Nobody wants to hear your problems. STEPHEN J. KLENK San Fernando
NEWS
October 6, 1989
The Kasems spend enormous amounts of time, creative energy and money in their attempts to make this planet a better place in which to live. I believe those efforts should be applauded and encouraged, not dealt with in the cynical, snide way reporter Finke chose as her way of making this "a story." In my opinion, if the rest of us gave the same amount of effort that the Kasems do in addressing these problems, the consciousness and the environment would no longer need improvement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1986
Enuff already! How old it was of you to print that snide little reprise of Barbara Hershey's now-ancient antics (Outtakes, July 27). I think Hershey's recent achievements bear some witness to her courage and integrity in being able to make a change for the better in her life, a lesson lost on some. Personal growth is something very valuable and highly commendable. The piece on her is more at home at the check-out counter than the pages of Calendar. ANTHONY ROLAND West Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1992 | JONATHAN GOLD
When Fear began in the late '70s, it was something of an art band, packing its snarling two-minute songs with dissonance and difficult 7/8 grooves as a sign of its contempt for its punk-rock audience. Later, Fear, who played harder and faster than anyone, became hard-core heroes. Fear's nasty audience-baiting became synonymous with a certain type of punk knuckleheadedness.
REAL ESTATE
April 2, 2000
An open letter to Billy Crystal: On Oscar night I was stunned to hear your wisecrack about "half of us know what it's like to be ripped off by a real estate agent. . . ." As a director of the Greater Los Angeles/Beverly Hills Assn. of Realtors, I feel it was sadly inappropriate for you to use our industry as the butt of a snide remark. Many of us with celebrity clientele work very hard to protect their interests and privacy and to educate ourselves in finance, contracts and negotiation so that our clients will be the beneficiaries when they spend millions of dollars on a home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1995
The ads for the current film about the University of Alabama football team are somewhat vague and confusing. Apparently, Denzel Washington plays the part of a brash, self-confident young quarterback, sort of a Joe Namath kind of guy. And, of course, Gene Hackman is perfect in the Bear Bryant role. It seems the conflict arises when the quarterback wants to call his own plays while the coach is equally determined to call them from the sidelines. Hackman tries to explain to Washington that he lacks the experience to know which call to make in a crucial situation, saying, at one point, "If you're wrong, God help us."
SPORTS
May 31, 2008
Helene Elliott's recent columns on the NHL have been refreshing changes from the nattering nabobs of negativism that now pass for sportswriters at the Los Angeles Times. She presents the facts and a few concise comments; no name calling, no snide remarks. Dave Walters Del Mar
OPINION
May 25, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Most cartoonists blissfully espouse opinions supporting the anti-family, anti-God, anti-American gay agenda. I do. And because nothing is more anti-family than marriage, we marched in wedlock-step with the recent California court decision. Nick Anderson was predisposed to trash the opposition. Jimmy Margulies pictured future attack ads -- and attacked them. And Lisa Benson -- apparently she didn't get the memo. You just can't predict those wacky left-coast Californians!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2006 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
IT'S no small feat, teasing out historical significance from two of fashion's most maligned decades, especially when they happened, what, two seconds ago? Yet, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's new costume exhibition lines up proof that the trashy '80s and the brooding '90s also had some radical moments that still influence how we think about clothes. We just couldn't see them under all those acid-washed jeans and black pantsuits.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eef Barzelay knows he's had it easy. The singer-guitarist for the band Clem Snide didn't grow up during the Great Depression or serve in Vietnam, nor does he live in Afghanistan. He comes from suburban New Jersey, which might seem an unlikely birthplace for Clem Snide's wistful, quietly emotional country rock. But as Neil Young once sang, "My problems may be meaningless, but that don't make them go away."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippe Mora's "Snide and Prejudice," about a mental patient indulged in his belief that he is Adolf Hitler, might work on the stage but is merely tedious on the screen. Mora starts out on a satirical tone, as a psychiatrist (Rene Auberjonois) with a posh only-in-L.A. clinic explains to The Times' Patt Morrison that he's embarking on this radical new program that's supposed to produce miraculous results.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Rakoff is doing his fish-out-of-water thing. On this sweltering morning he is outfitted in a brown jacket over a navy T-shirt, dark slacks and black thick-soled boots--made not for scaling mountains but for prowling, clubbing and other vagaries of urban adventure. The current trek plops this Canadian-cum-New Yorker at the fringes of L.A. summer with a different purpose.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Philippe Mora's "Snide and Prejudice," about a mental patient indulged in his belief that he is Adolf Hitler, might work on the stage but is merely tedious on the screen. Mora starts out on a satirical tone, as a psychiatrist (Rene Auberjonois) with a posh only-in-L.A. clinic explains to The Times' Patt Morrison that he's embarking on this radical new program that's supposed to produce miraculous results.
OPINION
May 25, 2008 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
Most cartoonists blissfully espouse opinions supporting the anti-family, anti-God, anti-American gay agenda. I do. And because nothing is more anti-family than marriage, we marched in wedlock-step with the recent California court decision. Nick Anderson was predisposed to trash the opposition. Jimmy Margulies pictured future attack ads -- and attacked them. And Lisa Benson -- apparently she didn't get the memo. You just can't predict those wacky left-coast Californians!
REAL ESTATE
April 2, 2000
An open letter to Billy Crystal: On Oscar night I was stunned to hear your wisecrack about "half of us know what it's like to be ripped off by a real estate agent. . . ." As a director of the Greater Los Angeles/Beverly Hills Assn. of Realtors, I feel it was sadly inappropriate for you to use our industry as the butt of a snide remark. Many of us with celebrity clientele work very hard to protect their interests and privacy and to educate ourselves in finance, contracts and negotiation so that our clients will be the beneficiaries when they spend millions of dollars on a home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1998 | ELYSA GARDNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of all the musicians hoping to win statuettes at tonight's Grammy Awards, none could be more excited than the three brothers in the pop group Hanson, whose deliriously catchy first single, "MMMBop," is a contender for record of the year. And none could be less likely to get liquor service at the after-show parties.
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