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August 26, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIRUT -- A convoy carrying a United Nations team investigating allegations of chemical weapons use in Syria was fired on Monday by snipers, forcing the group to turn back, the U.N. said. The attack occurred on the team's first day of work looking into controversial allegations of a poison-gas bombardment last week in the Damascus suburbs. The team's task involves the dangerous job of traveling from relatively secure, government-controlled areas of central Damascus to contested areas east of the capital where armed rebels are heavily active.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz
In the annals of Texas journalism, Robert Heard stands out for many things: a biting wit, a prolific career, a lawyer's understanding of lawmaking, a determination to get the story even at considerable personal risk. It was the last trait that catapulted him from news reporter to news figure on Aug. 1, 1966, when he was shot in the shoulder during Charles Whitman's bloody rampage from the top of the University of Texas Tower in Austin. Heard, a 36-year-old Associated Press reporter, had followed two highway patrol officers on a wild sprint across a parking lot, but he forgot his Marine's training to zigzag.
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WORLD
February 20, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - He bent over the limp body and raised a corner of the bloody white sheet that covered it. Volodymyr Holodnyuk let out a dull moan and let the fabric drop. He then picked up a blue helmet that lay at the feet of the body, its insides gummy with blood, and ran his trembling fingers along the surface until he found what he was looking for: a hole left by a 7.62-millimeter bullet, the sort used by a Dragunov sniper rifle. The helmet, and the body, belonged to Holodnyuk's son, Ustym, a 19-year-old engineering student who was among at least 67 protesters killed in central Kiev early Thursday, at least 20 of them brought down by snipers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Clint Eastwood's latest movie, "American Sniper," kicked off with a bang in Los Angeles County this week. The Warner Bros. film, which stars Bradley Cooper as a Navy SEAL who recounts his military exploits, began 10 days of filming Monday in an Afghan village set at the Blue Cloud Movie Ranch in the Santa Clarita area. The scenes involved "simulated warfare sequences with full load automatic gunfire, explosions, squibs, bullet hits, smoke, burning debris," according to a county film permit.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Two people were dead in Fort Wayne, Ind., after a man pulled his ex-girlfriend off a bus Wednesday and shot her in broad daylight, then ran away, police said. Police identified the woman as Jacqueline Bouvier Hardy, 49, and the man as Kenneth Knight, 45. Hardy had recently obtained a restraining order against Knight.  About four hours later, police tracked Knight to a house where he had holed up with a 3-year-old and three adults, police said. The three adults reportedly ran out of the house when police arrived.
NATIONAL
October 26, 2002 | From the Washington Post
The cover page is neat and impressive. "For you Mr. Police," it says. "Call me God." The words are surrounded by five stars placed in an orderly way. The letter left at the sniper shooting in Ashland, Va., on Oct. 19 is chilling in its detail and its threats but also provides a treasure trove of clues. It contains phone numbers and locations the snipers called in half a dozen unsuccessful attempts to contact authorities.
NEWS
November 23, 1988 | United Press International
A woman who survived a sniping attack while rafting down the Rio Grande River last weekend told relatives that the snipers laughed and taunted them before killing her husband and wounding her and their guide. Jamie Heffley, 32, told her parents and in-laws that her husband, Mike Heffley, even offered the gunmen money if they would stop shooting.
WORLD
March 17, 2003 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
For most of the Marines here, the opening of a war against the Iraqi army would be called G-day, for ground offensive. But for Sgt. Ken Sutherby and Cpl. Cameron Gingras, it could be called the opening of hunting season. Their specialty -- one of the most difficult and misunderstood in the military -- could be key to a battle for Baghdad.
WORLD
February 20, 2010 | By Laura King
Following the deadliest day yet for coalition forces seeking to drive the Taliban from the town of Marja in southern Afghanistan, another Western service member was killed Friday by small-arms fire, military officials said. Surprisingly accurate Taliban snipers, together with intricate webs of roadside bombs, slowed the progress of the offensive as it neared the end of its first week. Commanders say key goals are being met, but they acknowledge that clearing operations around the town probably will take about a month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1994
Having just returned from South Africa where I met so many fine Zulu people, I took offense to Anthony Hazlitt Heard's accusation of Zulus going "on the rampage laying into civilians" (Commentary, March 30). Following the aforementioned quote, Heard admitted that the Zulus were fired upon from high-rise buildings. Hey, I'd run too if snipers were firing at me. Then Heard evoked the name of God in his next untruth wherein he accused the Zulu demonstrators of attempting to "storm the ANC headquarters."
WORLD
April 2, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Ukraine's ousted president on Wednesday lamented the loss of Crimea to Russia as “a grave pain and tragedy very difficult to come to terms with” but insisted the current interim government in Kiev was solely responsible for the annexation of the region. “I personally can't agree” on the annexation of Crimea, Viktor Yanukovich said in a televised interview with the Associated Press and NTV, a Russian television network. “If this were happening under me, I would have tried to prevent it.” Yanukovich acknowledged that he had asked Russian President Vladimir Putin to deploy troops on the Ukrainian peninsula to stop “the outrages by armed gangs of nationalists.” “I also did this because I myself became an object of an attack by bandits,” he said in the interview, conducted in the Russian city Rostov-on-Don.
SPORTS
February 24, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - The summer in Helmand province, an arid region of southern Afghanistan known to be a Taliban stronghold, was the worst. Hunkering down for eight months in a mud-hut compound with no running water was challenging enough for 1st Lt. Nick Francona and his U.S. Marine Corps rifle platoon. The 120-degree heat of July and August was unbearable. "You take your body armor off, and steam comes out," Francona, now 28, said. "We'd pour water bottles over our heads to rinse off, but I think I took one hot shower the whole time I was there.
WORLD
February 20, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - He bent over the limp body and raised a corner of the bloody white sheet that covered it. Volodymyr Holodnyuk let out a dull moan and let the fabric drop. He then picked up a blue helmet that lay at the feet of the body, its insides gummy with blood, and ran his trembling fingers along the surface until he found what he was looking for: a hole left by a 7.62-millimeter bullet, the sort used by a Dragunov sniper rifle. The helmet, and the body, belonged to Holodnyuk's son, Ustym, a 19-year-old engineering student who was among at least 67 protesters killed in central Kiev early Thursday, at least 20 of them brought down by snipers.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2014 | By David Zucchino
TAMPA, Fla. - As an Army sniper in Iraq and Afghanistan, Gabriel Brown craved danger. Combat satisfied what he called his "adrenaline addiction. " When he returned home to Florida, nothing in civilian life provided the sense of invincibility that made combat so alluring and vital. The sniper was now a nursing student. There was a hole in his life, but he found a way to fill it: robbing banks. He robbed with a military flair. On Feb. 5, 2013, Brown whipped out a gun and tossed an M83 military smoke grenade during a robbery of a TD Bank branch in Auburndale, Fla., that netted $19,000.
WORLD
December 15, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- An Israeli soldier was killed Sunday evening by shots fired over the border from Lebanon, the Israeli military reported. According to the statement , a sniper with the Lebanese military fired shots at a vehicle driving along the Israeli-Lebanese border, killing the Israeli soldier. The Israeli army fired at a Lebanese military post in retaliation, Israeli media reported early Monday. The Israeli military lodged a complaint with the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon , or UNIFIL, of the "outrageous breach of Israel's sovereignty" and has stepped up preparedness along the border, military spokesman Lt. Col. Peter Lerner said in the statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey
It was both eerie and gripping to watch the smart new true-crime drama "Blue Caprice" just days after the shooting rampage at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. Loosely based on the 2002 Beltway shootings - 13 killed or injured by sniper fire - director Alexandre Moors' stylish first feature unfolds like a procedural. Yellow crime tape and draped bodies to start, then a shift to dissect the criminal minds, rather than the crime. An alliance between 17-year-old Lee Boyd Malvo and angry ex-soldier John Allen Muhammad proved deadly.
NEWS
June 28, 1988 | From Reuters
Austrian police discovered an assassination plot against Pope John Paul II during his visit to Vienna, ABC News reported Monday. The U.S. television network said the plot called for snipers to shoot at the Pope as he visited St. Stephen's Cathedral in central Vienna last Thursday. The Pope, who returned to the Vatican on Monday, was wounded in 1981 in St. Peter's Square in Rome by Mehmet Ali Agca, a Turkish member of a right-wing group.
WORLD
August 25, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
BEIRUT - Syrian activists Saturday reported a massacre in a suburb of Damascus that may have claimed more than 200 lives in the last few days. Some activists were estimating that the death toll could reach 300 as government forces continued an onslaught against Dariya, a suburb of the capital, using tanks, warplanes and snipers. Residents found 122 bodies in the basement of a building still under construction, said Abu Kinan, an activist in Dariya. All appeared to have been executed, he said.
WORLD
August 26, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Raja Abdulrahim
BEIRUT - Delayed by a sniper attack, United Nations chemical weapons inspectors arrived Monday in one of the Syrian suburbs allegedly hit in a poison gas attack last week, visiting a pair of field hospitals and meeting with witnesses, the U.N. said. The inspectors traveled to the Muadhamiya district, southwest of Damascus, after sniper volleys initially forced the U.N. convoy to turn back to the capital. A U.N. vehicle was struck in the incident, but no one was injured, the U.N. said in a statement.
WORLD
August 26, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIRUT -- A convoy carrying a United Nations team investigating allegations of chemical weapons use in Syria was fired on Monday by snipers, forcing the group to turn back, the U.N. said. The attack occurred on the team's first day of work looking into controversial allegations of a poison-gas bombardment last week in the Damascus suburbs. The team's task involves the dangerous job of traveling from relatively secure, government-controlled areas of central Damascus to contested areas east of the capital where armed rebels are heavily active.
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