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Snocap Inc

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BUSINESS
May 1, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Warner Music Group Corp. agreed to use technology from Napster founder Shawn Fanning to sell song downloads on websites including MySpace.com. Warner is the first major recording company to sign such an agreement with Snocap Inc., Fanning's San Francisco-based digital-rights technology firm, the companies said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 2005 | From Associated Press
Record company EMI Group has signed an agreement with Snocap Inc., a legal music file-sharing company created by Shawn Fanning, who also created Napster, the most famous illegal file-sharing system. The agreement allows London-based EMI to use Snocap, a program that allows sharing but identifies copyrighted music files and prevents them from being traded unless the user pays a copyright fee. Terms were not disclosed.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Warner Music Group Corp. said Thursday that it had settled its copyright infringement lawsuit against the social-networking website Imeem by agreeing to license its music and video content to the site for a slice of its ad revenue. Financial details of the settlement were not disclosed. Under the agreement, Imeem Inc. can carry music and videos from all of the record company's artists, who include Madonna, Linkin Park and Red Hot Chili Peppers.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2004 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Breaking from the rest of the entertainment industry, record giant Sony BMG is cooperating with the Grokster file-sharing network on a venture that combines free music sampling with paid downloads. Dubbed "Mashboxx," the venture marks a surprising alliance between a major record label and an online network that the entertainment industry has blamed for rampant piracy.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2005 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Two months after the Supreme Court ruled that online file-sharing services can be held liable for the copyright violations of their users, some of the biggest names in song swapping are looking to go legit. The head of EDonkey, which built one of the most popular ways for finding pirated music and movies, said Monday that a transformation of the software was "certainly imminent." And Grokster Ltd.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2007 | Alana Semuels and Michelle Quinn, Times Staff Writers
A world without digital handcuffs on downloaded music sounds pretty good to Eston Bond, a 21-year old senior at the University of Michigan. Bond, a self-proclaimed music lover, is sick of the anti-piracy software that limits how he can listen to music downloaded from Apple Inc.'s iTunes and other online stores. If it weren't for those restrictions, he said, he'd buy a lot more music -- and listen to it in more ways.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2005 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court's ruling that file-sharing companies could be held liable for their users' piracy was cheered loudly by one small corner of the file-sharing universe. Call it the reform wing. A handful of companies are trying to build an audience for legal file sharing, enabling people to swap songs for a fee, not free. Three of them -- Mashboxx of Virginia Beach, Va., IMesh of New York and Ruckus Network Inc. of Herndon, Va.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2004 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Having condemned file-sharing for five years, the music industry is now trying to co-opt it. Online music businesses are adding features once found only in file-sharing networks, such as the ability to send free songs to friends and to listen to them on a variety of portable players. And a handful of companies are developing hybrid peer-to-peer networks that encourage sharing but prevent users from violating copyright law. One example is Mercora Inc. of Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2004 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
At 19, Napster founder Shawn Fanning graced the cover of Time magazine as the velveteen-haired frontman for online music piracy. Now, at 24, his second set is taking a different direction: Legitimizing the revolution Napster started. Fanning's new company, Snocap Inc., aims to transform the music-swapping free-for-all Napster sparked into a vast online marketplace where people can buy authorized tracks from each other.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2007 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Christine "Forbidden" Dolce, Tila Tequila and Bobbi Billard each have accumulated more than a million admirers on MySpace.com, making them among the handful of most popular people on the world's most popular social networking website. That may have something to do with the amount of skin they show on their MySpace pages.
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