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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE -   One month after the Washington state landslide that killed at least 34, President Obama is planning to survey the destruction firsthand. Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that Obama will travel on April 22 to the site of the mammoth slide that closed State Route 530 and destroyed dozens of homes, prompting a major disaster declaration from the White House. The president is scheduled to meet with families of the dead and missing, first responders and recovery workers, Inslee said.
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NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The confirmed death toll from the Washington landslide continues to rise, with officials confirming Tuesday morning that they have recovered the remains of at least 27 people. The latest tally from the Snohomish County medical examiner said officials have identified the remains of only 19 of the 27 confirmed victims and were working "diligently" to confirm the rest. All of those identified were from Snohomish County and died from multiple blunt-force injuries, according to the examiner's office.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A retired librarian became the first of the at least 30 people killed in last month's landslide in Washington to be memorialized as several hundred people gathered to remember her life Saturday afternoon. Two weeks ago, Linda McPherson was reading a newspaper alongside her husband of 46 years when, in a quick blast of mud, she was killed at the age of 69. Gary McPherson was left injured in a freezing pile of the muck. Rescuers haven't abandoned the Snohomish County town of Oso. Thirteen people remained missing as of Saturday night.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- A week after a mudslide ripped through the town and the highway that connects Arlington and nearby Darrington, the communities plan to mark the anniversary with a moment of silence. Gov. Jay Inslee extended the observance statewide, with his office asking residents "to join him in this moment of silence as a show of respect for those who have died and a gesture of comfort for those who grieve. " The death toll from the mudslide in Oso stands at 17, with another victim recovered Friday and 90 more people still missing.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE -   One month after the Washington state landslide that killed at least 34, President Obama is planning to survey the destruction firsthand. Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that Obama will travel on April 22 to the site of the mammoth slide that closed State Route 530 and destroyed dozens of homes, prompting a major disaster declaration from the White House. The president is scheduled to meet with families of the dead and missing, first responders and recovery workers, Inslee said.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Gallardo is in hiding, burned out of his Washington house the morning of his release from prison on July 12 and hounded from an angry New Mexico town a week later. He is a convicted child rapist. His case is focusing new attention on how authorities handle the release of sex offenders and whether public notifications may give rise to vigilantism.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A retired librarian became the first of the at least 30 people killed in last month's landslide in Washington to be memorialized as several hundred people gathered to remember her life Saturday afternoon. Two weeks ago, Linda McPherson was reading a newspaper alongside her husband of 46 years when, in a quick blast of mud, she was killed at the age of 69. Gary McPherson was left injured in a freezing pile of the muck. Rescuers haven't abandoned the Snohomish County town of Oso. Thirteen people remained missing as of Saturday night.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Washington officials on Friday pleaded for patience from a heartbroken public as they continued work to identify the dead from the mudslide that officially killed 17 when it tore through the rural town of Oso. At a morning news conference, Snohomish County Fire Chief Travis Hots told reporters that the confirmed death toll remained at 17 but repeated that it was expected to increase as the medical examiner's office completed identifications...
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Residents along the Stillaguamish River had felt protected from small landslides during the past eight years because Snohomish County spent millions of dollars shoring up the area after a mudslide in 2006, the county's Emergency Management Director John Pennington said Wednesday. But the landslide that struck last Saturday was "large" and "catastrophic,” Pennington said at a news conference.  The mudslide tore through 49 homes. At least 16 people have been confirmed dead and as many as 176 people are missing.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
The confirmed death toll from the Washington landslide continues to rise, with officials confirming Tuesday morning that they have recovered the remains of at least 27 people. The latest tally from the Snohomish County medical examiner said officials have identified the remains of only 19 of the 27 confirmed victims and were working "diligently" to confirm the rest. All of those identified were from Snohomish County and died from multiple blunt-force injuries, according to the examiner's office.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- A week after a mudslide ripped through the town and the highway that connects Arlington and nearby Darrington, the communities plan to mark the anniversary with a moment of silence. Gov. Jay Inslee extended the observance statewide, with his office asking residents "to join him in this moment of silence as a show of respect for those who have died and a gesture of comfort for those who grieve. " The death toll from the mudslide in Oso stands at 17, with another victim recovered Friday and 90 more people still missing.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Michael Muskal
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Washington officials on Friday pleaded for patience from a heartbroken public as they continued work to identify the dead from the mudslide that officially killed 17 when it tore through the rural town of Oso. At a morning news conference, Snohomish County Fire Chief Travis Hots told reporters that the confirmed death toll remained at 17 but repeated that it was expected to increase as the medical examiner's office completed identifications...
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. - The Stillaguamish River and the Hazel Slide have been rivals for decades. The river eats away at the clay and sand hillside to the north of the snaking river. Weakened by the erosion, the hill's foot lacks the strength to fight the pull of gravity. Rain and logging add to the river's offense. In this deep-seated recess, landslides are inevitable. They send sediment surging into the river, deforming it for years until the cycle repeats. DOCUMENTS: Warnings about landslides in Snohomish County This ongoing battle exploded Saturday in a catastrophic geological event as a wall of mud, trees and rocks slammed into the river below, blocking the flow.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. -- Residents along the Stillaguamish River had felt protected from small landslides during the past eight years because Snohomish County spent millions of dollars shoring up the area after a mudslide in 2006, the county's Emergency Management Director John Pennington said Wednesday. But the landslide that struck last Saturday was "large" and "catastrophic,” Pennington said at a news conference.  The mudslide tore through 49 homes. At least 16 people have been confirmed dead and as many as 176 people are missing.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2004 | From Associated Press
It was a lot of money for a small public agency but a bright idea: spend $100,000 getting hundreds of hours of Enron Corp. traders' conversations put down on paper. The investment by the small Snohomish County Public Utility District paid off big, with bombshell evidence that could have been uncovered long ago -- profanity-laced recordings of Enron workers gleefully conspiring to steal money from "those poor grandmothers" in California during the energy crunch of 2000-01.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
ARLINGTON, Wash. - The Stillaguamish River and the Hazel Slide have been rivals for decades. The river eats away at the clay and sand hillside to the north of the snaking river. Weakened by the erosion, the hill's foot lacks the strength to fight the pull of gravity. Rain and logging add to the river's offense. In this deep-seated recess, landslides are inevitable. They send sediment surging into the river, deforming it for years until the cycle repeats. DOCUMENTS: Warnings about landslides in Snohomish County This ongoing battle exploded Saturday in a catastrophic geological event as a wall of mud, trees and rocks slammed into the river below, blocking the flow.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2004 | From Associated Press
It was a lot of money for a small public agency but a bright idea: spend $100,000 getting hundreds of hours of Enron Corp. traders' conversations put down on paper. The investment by the small Snohomish County Public Utility District paid off big, with bombshell evidence that could have been uncovered long ago -- profanity-laced recordings of Enron workers gleefully conspiring to steal money from "those poor grandmothers" in California during the energy crunch of 2000-01.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Gallardo is in hiding, burned out of his Washington house the morning of his release from prison on July 12 and hounded from an angry New Mexico town a week later. He is a convicted child rapist. His case is focusing new attention on how authorities handle the release of sex offenders and whether public notifications may give rise to vigilantism.
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