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Snooky Young

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011
Snooky Young Jazz trumpeter in 'Tonight Show' band Snooky Young, 92, a jazz trumpeter whose long career included working with big bands led by Jimmie Lunceford and Count Basie as well as a lengthy stint with NBC's "Tonight Show" band, died Wednesday at a residence in Newport Beach, said family friend William Selditz. The cause was complications from a lung disorder. Young came to prominence from 1939 to 1942 as lead trumpeter and soloist for Lunceford before working with such noted musicians as Lionel Hampton, Benny Carter and Gerald Wilson.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011
Snooky Young Jazz trumpeter in 'Tonight Show' band Snooky Young, 92, a jazz trumpeter whose long career included working with big bands led by Jimmie Lunceford and Count Basie as well as a lengthy stint with NBC's "Tonight Show" band, died Wednesday at a residence in Newport Beach, said family friend William Selditz. The cause was complications from a lung disorder. Young came to prominence from 1939 to 1942 as lead trumpeter and soloist for Lunceford before working with such noted musicians as Lionel Hampton, Benny Carter and Gerald Wilson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a regular mutual admiration society between trumpeter Snooky Young and saxophonist Bob Cooper. "Snooky is one of the world's all-time great trumpet players," Cooper said of his 20-year pal earlier this week in a phone conversation from his home in Sherman Oaks. "I can always feel it in the sax section when he's playing--his time, his interpretation of the material, his sound." "I love working with Bob," Young said, also by phone, from his home in Van Nuys.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a regular mutual admiration society between trumpeter Snooky Young and saxophonist Bob Cooper. "Snooky is one of the world's all-time great trumpet players," Cooper said of his 20-year pal earlier this week in a phone conversation from his home in Sherman Oaks. "I can always feel it in the sax section when he's playing--his time, his interpretation of the material, his sound." "I love working with Bob," Young said, also by phone, from his home in Van Nuys.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
The fourth and last installment in KLON's "Jazz West Coast" series presented Sunday at the John Anson Ford Theater was subtitled "Central Avenue Revisited." Producer Ken Poston came up with several reasonable facsimiles of the tail end of those days. Marshal Royal's alto sax and Snooky Young's trumpet reached heights that were hard to top. Though their pianist and drummer, Tom Ranier and Greg Field, were born long after Central Avenue faded, they and the bassist Richard Reid were strongly supported in this most professional set. Professionalism was in short supply when the so-called Central Avenue All-Stars were on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Vocalist and guitarist George Benson was among the recipients named Tuesday for the National Endowment of the Arts' 2009 Jazz Masters Award. Also chosen for the $25,000 award, to be presented in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 17, were drummer Jimmy Cobb, saxophonist Lee Konitz, trumpet player Snooky Young, harmonica and guitar player Toots Thielemans and recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
*** Jack Lemmon, "Getting Some Fun Out of Life," LaserLight. The actor is a pleasant singer and a capable pianist who knows his jazz. On the four vocal cuts--the best of which is the Fred Astaire-accented "Sure Thing," Ross Tompkins replaces him at the keyboard. Lemmon tends toward florid piano runs, but is capable of fine harmonic conception and shows talent as a composer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1997
The Los Angeles Jazz Society has announced the winners of its 15th annual tribute and awards, set to be given at a dinner and concert at the Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore Hotel downtown on Sept. 14. Vibraphonist Terry Gibbs is this year's tribute honoree, Joe Williams wins the jazz vocalist award, bassist Charlie Haden the jazz educator award, Van Alexander the composer-arranger award, and the lifetime achievement award will be given to trumpeter Snooky Young.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
"Bringing two jazz families together" is the way producer Betty Berry describes this weekend's International Jazz Party at the Westside Room of the Century Plaza Hotel. Among the Los Angeles jazz artists appearing will be saxophonists Ricky Woodard and Pete Christlieb, trumpeter Snooky Young, trombonist Carl Fontana and singer Sue Raney and the Bill Berry L.A. Band. Also performing, and occasionally working with the L.A. players, will be Japanese clarinetist Eiji Kitamura and his quintet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1999
* Theater. Eugene O'Neill's "A Moon for the Misbegotten" opens next Thursday at the Laguna Playhouse's Moulton Theatre, 606 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach, playing Tuesdays-Saturdays at 8 p.m.; Sundays at 7 p.m.; Saturdays-Sundays at 2 p.m. (Matinee only on May 16.) $31 to $38. Ends May 16. (949) 497-2787. * Jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
The fourth and last installment in KLON's "Jazz West Coast" series presented Sunday at the John Anson Ford Theater was subtitled "Central Avenue Revisited." Producer Ken Poston came up with several reasonable facsimiles of the tail end of those days. Marshal Royal's alto sax and Snooky Young's trumpet reached heights that were hard to top. Though their pianist and drummer, Tom Ranier and Greg Field, were born long after Central Avenue faded, they and the bassist Richard Reid were strongly supported in this most professional set. Professionalism was in short supply when the so-called Central Avenue All-Stars were on stage.
NEWS
May 13, 1995
Marshall Royal, the lead saxophonist with Count Basie after Basie formed a new band in 1951 and a veteran of such venues as New York's Cotton Club and Los Angeles' Paramount and Shubert theaters, has died. A family spokeswoman said he was 82 when he died Monday of cancer in Culver City. A native of Oklahoma, Royal studied violin and guitar as well as the reed instruments and gave his first professional performance at age 13.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
No crystal ball is needed to determine that John Clayton has an extremely promising future as a major force in jazz. With his two partners, brother Jeff Clayton on saxes and drummer Jeff Hamilton, he took the 17-piece Clayton/Hamilton Orchestra through a collection of his own brilliantly crafted arrangements, receiving a thunderous ovation Thursday from a jam-packed house at the Loa. While drawing on his roots, Clayton blends them with contemporary concepts of his own.
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