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Snoopy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO -- The world's most recognizable beagle may soon be spotted on California cars. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego), along with officials from the Department of Motor Vehicles and other state agencies, publicized a new option for California motorists Thursday: a license plate adorned with a picture of Snoopy, the beloved canine from the "Peanuts" comic strip. Atkins wrote the law last year that allows the California Cultural and Historical Endowment to create a grant program funded by revenue from the license plates that would pay for small capital projects at museums.
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NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Brady MacDonald
It's no fun to visit a theme park and not get to go on the rides. And that's the big problem with Camp Snoopy at Knott's Berry Farm: Far too many rides that parents can't experience with their kids. But that will begin to change this summer when the Buena Park theme park gives the 30-year-old kiddie land a much-needed facelift and removes a number of rides with height maximums that prevent families from having fun together. PHOTOS: Camp Snoopy at Knott's Berry Farm Gone are the Log Peeler kiddie scrambler ride (48-inch maximum)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2008 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
Animator, director and producer Jose Cuautemoc "Bill" Melendez, whose television programs and theatrical films featuring Charles Schulz's "Peanuts" characters earned four Emmy Awards, an Oscar nomination and two Peabody Awards, died Tuesday at St. John's hospital in Santa Monica, according to publicist Amy Goldsmith. He was 91. Melendez's career extended over nearly seven decades, including stints at Walt Disney Studios, Leon Schlesinger Cartoons (which later was sold to Warner Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO -- The world's most recognizable beagle may soon be spotted on California cars. Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego), along with officials from the Department of Motor Vehicles and other state agencies, publicized a new option for California motorists Thursday: a license plate adorned with a picture of Snoopy, the beloved canine from the "Peanuts" comic strip. Atkins wrote the law last year that allows the California Cultural and Historical Endowment to create a grant program funded by revenue from the license plates that would pay for small capital projects at museums.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"Snoopy the Musical," an animated special airing tonight at 8 p.m. on CBS (Channels 2 and 8), casually trashes the qualities that made "Peanuts" so popular. (It's adapted from the play "Snoopy!!!," which was based on the comic strip.) The world Charles Schulz created in his strip was innocent, insouciant, whimsical and warm; "Snoopy" is calculated, self-conscious, labored and inept. Although trimmed to fit an hour time slot, the show still seems to last as long as a summer cold.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1996 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? The Charles M. Schulz "Peanuts"-based musical "Snoopy" may be long in the tooth, but Broadway on Tour's vibrant, mostly teenage cast gives it a youthful sparkle at an unlikely venue: the Roxy Theatre on Sunset Strip. The show, trimmed down to a quick hour, inaugurates the Roxy's new, family-friendly matinee children's theater series and gives the talented company a chance to shine in a professional setting.
OPINION
December 19, 1999
Re "Good Grief! Charles Schulz Calls It Quits," Dec. 15: I am saddened by the illness and retirement of Charles Schulz and his "Peanuts" characters, but I am glad that this cartoon strip had such a long and successful run. My husband and I had so much fondness for the "Peanuts" gang that when we married in 1978 we had Snoopy wedding invitations. The invitations depicted Snoopy and Woodstock leaving home, and the reception portrayed Snoopy dressed in his top hat and tux. Our wedding cake also featured Snoopy and Woodstock.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Art will imitate life next month in the comic strip, "Peanuts," when Snoopy will injure his knee, requiring surgery and postoperative therapy. An enthusiastic amateur athlete, cartoonist Charles Schulz needed arthroscopic surgery (and is still undergoing physical therapy) for a knee injury he incurred in a hockey game in mid-September. "I'm not sure how I did it," says Schulz, "I just remember crashing into the boards and lying there thinking 'I've broken my leg."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Jay Hofstadter was in a panic as he taped his missing-dog posters on streetlight poles in North Hollywood. His 8-year-old beagle Snoopy had escaped out the front door of his Ben Avenue house and disappeared. Though he didn't know it at the time, Martha Aguel had already come to his rescue. A former county worker who lost her job, Aguel is homeless. She's also an animal lover. So she didn't hesitate when she spied the beagle foraging for food behind a shopping center trash bin. She scooped up Snoopy and carried him to the culvert where she lives with her own two dogs, a poodle named Chino and a Chihuahua called Nina.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2008 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Maybe you came here, to the edge of wine country, for some grown-up fun amid the Cabernets and Chardonnays of Napa Valley. But for dessert, you get the house that Charlie Brown built. Or rather, the museum Charles M. Schulz built. And the ice rink, the coffee shop, the gift shop, the gardens and the baseball field. Schulz, the father of the "Peanuts" cartoon strip, lived in Sonoma County for more than 40 years, constructing an empire around the hapless Charlie Brown and the irrepressible Snoopy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Susan King
Sometimes the smallest notion can create magic. The 1973 animated special "A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving " was based on a "very simple idea," said the show's producer Lee Mendelson. Charles M. Schulz, the creator of the beloved "Peanuts" comic strip, "said I wonder what it would be like if kids did Thanksgiving dinner and the chaos that would ensue. That is what it is all about. " "A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving" premiered on CBS on Nov. 20, 1973, and has been a staple on TV ever since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Gov. Jerry Brown has cleared the way for California to begin issuing license plates adorned with the classic Peanuts beagle, Snoopy. Revenue generated from the specialized plate sales will benefit the California Cultural and Historical Endowment and fund museums statewide under AB 482, proposed by Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego). Brown signed the bill earlier this month. More than 9,200 Californians have pledged to buy one of the plates, according to Atkins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2013 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Jay Hofstadter was in a panic as he taped his missing-dog posters on streetlight poles in North Hollywood. His 8-year-old beagle Snoopy had escaped out the front door of his Ben Avenue house and disappeared. Though he didn't know it at the time, Martha Aguel had already come to his rescue. A former county worker who lost her job, Aguel is homeless. She's also an animal lover. So she didn't hesitate when she spied the beagle foraging for food behind a shopping center trash bin. She scooped up Snoopy and carried him to the culvert where she lives with her own two dogs, a poodle named Chino and a Chihuahua called Nina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
He may not be taking on the Red Baron in this one, but Snoopy may soon be seen on the back of some California cars. The state Assembly passed a bill Thursday that would establish a Snoopy license plate to benefit California museums. AB 482, introduced by Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (D-San Diego), passed with a vote of 57-19. The bill, which now goes to the Senate, would allow the California Cultural and Historical Endowment to use the revenue from the plate to create a new grant program to support small capital projects at museums.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Director Jen Soska and her twin sister came to Comic-Con with one gory aim: Gross out as many people as possible with blood-soaked footage from their upcoming independent horror movie, "American Mary. " And indeed, clips from the film about a broke medical student who starts performing underground surgeries attracted a healthy crowd of onlookers to a room in the San Diego convention center. "We wanted to physically make you ill!" Soska told the audience cheerfully.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Carla Hall
It's always amusing when celebrities are outraged over the media scrutiny (either from snoopy tabloids or snoopy mainstream publications) of their looks.  And certainly women are judged more than men in this regard. Although that's changing.  Awhile back, tabloids went through a season of speculation over whether Michael Douglas had had a face lift.  And who can forget the great fun that every outlet had with Nick Nolte's wild-haired arrest mugshot?  Some pundit even took the hallowed George Clooney to task for looking like he had been squeezed into his Armani tux at the Oscars.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2013 | By Susan King
Sometimes the smallest notion can create magic. The 1973 animated special "A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving " was based on a "very simple idea," said the show's producer Lee Mendelson. Charles M. Schulz, the creator of the beloved "Peanuts" comic strip, "said I wonder what it would be like if kids did Thanksgiving dinner and the chaos that would ensue. That is what it is all about. " "A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving" premiered on CBS on Nov. 20, 1973, and has been a staple on TV ever since.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Carla Hall
It's always amusing when celebrities are outraged over the media scrutiny (either from snoopy tabloids or snoopy mainstream publications) of their looks.  And certainly women are judged more than men in this regard. Although that's changing.  Awhile back, tabloids went through a season of speculation over whether Michael Douglas had had a face lift.  And who can forget the great fun that every outlet had with Nick Nolte's wild-haired arrest mugshot?  Some pundit even took the hallowed George Clooney to task for looking like he had been squeezed into his Armani tux at the Oscars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2011 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
For 44 years, the Jordan family crafted an elaborate Charlie Brown-themed Christmas display outside their Costa Mesa home. The doctor was in, with a Lucy cutout offering counseling. Charlie Brown and Sally clutched a wrapped gift. Linus (with blanket) stood beneath the Christmas tree. And much of the "Peanuts" gang ice-skated around a faux pond. "I grew up around the corner from there. It's been there every year," said Lisa Dugan, who helps with the setup.
TRAVEL
September 21, 2008 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Maybe you came here, to the edge of wine country, for some grown-up fun amid the Cabernets and Chardonnays of Napa Valley. But for dessert, you get the house that Charlie Brown built. Or rather, the museum Charles M. Schulz built. And the ice rink, the coffee shop, the gift shop, the gardens and the baseball field. Schulz, the father of the "Peanuts" cartoon strip, lived in Sonoma County for more than 40 years, constructing an empire around the hapless Charlie Brown and the irrepressible Snoopy.
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