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HEALTH
August 18, 2008
Re your Aug. 11 article on snoring [“A Silent Night? Sounds Dreamy,”] I did the sleep studies and tried the nasal strips. Surgery was suggested. But the Brookstone pillow worked. At first I thought my wife of 29 years was teasing me when she said I didn't snore. It should be tried by anyone who can sleep on their side. Rick Warner Newport Beach I was one of the wives who slept away from her husband because I couldn't sleep with his loud snoring. I warned him about sleep apnea, but it turned out that it was even more serious: He had tonsillar cancer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
With a ferociously sharp mind tempered by a more forgiving exterior -- those basset hound eyes, that creamy-porridge voice -- British actor/writer/game show host/Twitter impresario Stephen Fry is one of life's guaranteed pleasures; I'd willingly watch him read the phone book. Which, unfortunately, is pretty much what he does in "Doors Open," an adaption of an Ian Rankin thriller of the same name debuting on the Ovation network Saturday night at 8 p.m. Or rather an art catalog; in "Doors Open" Fry plays Robert Gissing, an art professor living in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he delivers lectures, curates the collection of a civic-minded bank and trades auction notes with pal and electronics entrepreneur Mike Mackenzie ("Primeval's" Douglas Henshall)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Several shots of liquor or mixed drinks before bedtime can trigger serious breathing problems in otherwise healthy men who snore, researchers reported. A study by the Scripps Clinic Sleep Disorders Center in La Jolla found snorers who drank "moderate" amounts of alcohol within an hour of bedtime had double the normal number of incidents in which breathing stops for at least 10 seconds.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
When other toddlers fall into blissfully silent slumber, does your wee one begin a noisy night of grunting, gasping and sawing? If so, brace yourself, because the terrible twos may just be the beginning of your child's trying behavior, says a new study. The research found that children who snore persistently at 2 and 3 years of age were rated by their caregivers as more difficult, with behavior that tended toward hyperactive, inattentive, irritable and depressed. Other studies have found that as persistent snorers get older, those behavioral difficulties persist.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Young children who snore could be at greater risk of becoming hyperactive than those who sleep quietly, researchers reported in the journal Sleep. The study strengthens earlier conclusions linking sleep disorders and hyperactivity and also seems to confirm that it is the snoring that comes first. "Sleep problems in both children and adults are often undiagnosed, even though they can have a major impact on health, behavior and quality of life," said Dr.
NEWS
June 26, 1986 | From Deutsche Presse-Agentur
Two hundred snorers are testing a "cure" that a Swedish company in Kopparberg developed for the affliction, it was reported here Wednesday. The snorers place a small electrical device under their pillow that starts vibrating at a certain sound level, thus causing the sleeper to turn over automatically. Swedish television said that those testing the device have reported overwhelming success.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE
Look at it as Bean-O for the nose. A New York company is marketing an over-the-counter homeopathic nose spray that promises to help snorers make it through the night in relative silence. Called Y-Snore, the compound is drawn from wild yams and ginger, which herbal-medicine guides recommend for bilious colic, among other aggravations of the lower digestive tract. What's good for the intestines is apparently good for the nose. Eastern Europe Inc.
OPINION
October 28, 2009 | Peter Garrison, Peter Garrison is a pilot and contributing editor to Flying magazine.
Istarted flying small airplanes when I was 18, and after I got out of the service, I used my GI Bill money to adorn my pilot's license with a Lear Jet rating. Most of the training consisted of takeoffs and landings at Bakersfield; we never climbed above 10,000 feet or went very fast. But at the end of the course we made a real flight -- to Las Vegas and back -- and I finally got to climb to something like a jet's cruising altitude and experience something like a jet's speed. The cockpit of a Lear Jet -- these were old Model 24s, the jet equivalent of a '55 Chevy -- was a tight place, with a steeply slanted windshield grazing your forehead, a tall instrument panel in front of you and a console projecting back between the seats.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | Associated Press
A man driving on an interstate highway was attacked by a mouse that apparently had been sleeping in the heater vent of his car and got too hot. As a result, Walter Miller's car ended up in a ditch near Billings on Monday night, and the mouse ended up dead. Patrolman Dallas Adkins said Miller, 59, of Silesia, was driving home on Interstate 90 when the mouse sprang from the dashboard, landed on his shirt and scampered up inside his coat.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
When other toddlers fall into blissfully silent slumber, does your wee one begin a noisy night of grunting, gasping and sawing? If so, brace yourself, because the terrible twos may just be the beginning of your child's trying behavior, says a new study. The research found that children who snore persistently at 2 and 3 years of age were rated by their caregivers as more difficult, with behavior that tended toward hyperactive, inattentive, irritable and depressed. Other studies have found that as persistent snorers get older, those behavioral difficulties persist.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Baby boomers' snoring has breathed life into the sales of mouth pieces, clips, strips, nose sprays and specialized mattresses. Now home builders have heard the roar. A so-called snore room is the latest offering from Del Webb, which builds communities for people 55 and older. Buyers whose marriages are plagued by a spouse who snorts, grunts and wheezes while he or she sleeps can opt for an adaptable bedroom plan marketed as the "owners retreat" at Sun City Shadow Hills in Indio.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2012 | By Lauren Beale
In the knee-jerk world of home building, flex space, bigger kitchens and upgraded bathrooms are in. Increasingly adaptable bedroom designs may be just the ticket for trend-driving Baby Boomers whose marriages are plagued by snorts, sniffles and wheezing. Enter the so-called snore room option at Del Webb's Sun City Shadow Hills in Indio. The secondary bedroom that shares the master bathroom was designed for 55 and older couples who may start out in the same bed but end up apart because of snoring, insomnia or late-night TV viewing habits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2012 | By Paul Pringle and Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
A top Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum official caught up in an ongoing financial scandal no longer works at the stadium, the county counsel's office said Wednesday. Ronald Lederkramer, the Coliseum's longtime finance director who was second in command, went on paid medical leave in September, shortly after a member of the stadium's governing commission demanded that he be fired. At the time, the Coliseum's interim general manager said he expected Lederkramer to return to his post.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Snoring and insomnia are conditions that appear to predict an individual's risk of developing metabolic syndrome and may even help cause it, according to a study released Wednesday. Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors -- excess abdominal fat, high triglycerides, high blood sugar, low HDL cholesterol and high blood pressure -- that increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. University of Pittsburgh researchers examined 812 people age 45 to 74 for metabolic syndrome or diabetes and gave them questionnaires on sleep quality.
OPINION
October 28, 2009 | Peter Garrison, Peter Garrison is a pilot and contributing editor to Flying magazine.
Istarted flying small airplanes when I was 18, and after I got out of the service, I used my GI Bill money to adorn my pilot's license with a Lear Jet rating. Most of the training consisted of takeoffs and landings at Bakersfield; we never climbed above 10,000 feet or went very fast. But at the end of the course we made a real flight -- to Las Vegas and back -- and I finally got to climb to something like a jet's cruising altitude and experience something like a jet's speed. The cockpit of a Lear Jet -- these were old Model 24s, the jet equivalent of a '55 Chevy -- was a tight place, with a steeply slanted windshield grazing your forehead, a tall instrument panel in front of you and a console projecting back between the seats.
HEALTH
August 18, 2008
Re your Aug. 11 article on snoring [“A Silent Night? Sounds Dreamy,”] I did the sleep studies and tried the nasal strips. Surgery was suggested. But the Brookstone pillow worked. At first I thought my wife of 29 years was teasing me when she said I didn't snore. It should be tried by anyone who can sleep on their side. Rick Warner Newport Beach I was one of the wives who slept away from her husband because I couldn't sleep with his loud snoring. I warned him about sleep apnea, but it turned out that it was even more serious: He had tonsillar cancer.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | ANNE KLARNER
Bra-ca-ca-ca-ca-ack! Snort, snort, slurp. The snorer sleeps on, unaware that small children and animals have fled in terror and the neighbors are asking who, in heaven's name, is running a buzz saw at this hour of the night? Maybe it's time to go listen to neurologist David A. Thompson speak Wednesday night on snoring and sleep apnea at Glendale Adventist Medical Center.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Even when he was a young man in the Army, David Parker could snore with the bears. "We had open barracks at the time. I remember in basic training, I was sleeping upstairs. Well, not only did the guys upstairs complain about my snoring, so did the guys downstairs," recalls Parker, now 46. And during his 16 years of marriage, patience has been truly a virtue for his wife, Carolyn. "She would either go to another bedroom or sleep on the couch," says Parker, of Los Angeles.
HEALTH
August 11, 2008 | Erin Cline Davis, Special to The Times
You're ON the verge of falling asleep, and then it starts. The snorting. The choking sounds. Sometimes there's even a little whistle to it. A family member or roommate sleeping nearby has launched into an all-night bout of snoring, and you're the one who is going to lie awake all night listening to it. According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 45% of normal adults snore at least occasionally, and 25% are habitual snorers....
SPORTS
April 22, 2008 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
There were no television cameras watching, no plethora of websites providing instant analysis, as the 1985 NFL draft stretched late into the night. A young scout back then, Pat Kirwan was sitting at the Tampa Bay Buccaneers table, taking calls from team headquarters and relaying picks to the podium, when the telephone rang with a strange voice on the line. It was the Buffalo Bills. "Are you sitting next to our table?" the caller asked. "Is our guy there?" The Bills' representative had dozed off.
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