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WORLD
July 10, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
As fugitive National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden weighs his asylum options, he should be familiar with the name Luis Posada Carriles. Both Venezuela and Cuba want to get their hands on the 85-year-old Posada, accused of orchestrating the 1976 terrorist bombing of a Cuban airliner in which all 73 on board died. The U.S. government has for years refused a Venezuelan extradition request for Posada, a Cuban-born Venezuelan citizen who lives in the supportive Cuban exile community of South Florida that applauds his longtime mission to kill former Cuban President Fidel Castro.
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WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Fugitive NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who had been keeping a low profile in Moscow since being granted asylum there in August, has broken out of his seclusion with a lengthy interview with the Washington Post and a recorded television address to be aired in Britain on Christmas Day. Snowden used his first significant direct media contacts since arriving in Russia in June to portray his disclosure of secret intelligence gathering programs as a...
WORLD
July 27, 2013 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela -- Does Edward Snowden know what he'd be getting into if he ends up gaining asylum here? Many Venezuelans doubt it. The former National Security Agency contractor remains in Russia seeking at least temporary asylum. But leaders in Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua have to varying degrees said they would be willing to take him in if he can work out a way to get to those countries. Venezuelans interviewed in recent days say they have more pressing concerns than taking in Snowden, who is wanted by the U.S. government on espionage charges for having leaked details of the government's efforts to monitor email and voice communications.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Where's Edward Snowden? Certainly I don't know; apparently, neither does the U.S. government, which wants to bring the leaker/whistle-blower/traitor/hero home to face the music for blowing the lid on the NSA's secret surveillance program. The Times on Sunday said he had fled Hong Kong for parts relatively unknown but said to include Russia, Cuba and Venezuela, with the ultimate destination Ecuador. Now, not to be a travel agent or anything, but Eddie my boy, you're heading too far south.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In what might be regarded as having the fox guard the henhouse, a leading Russian website has hired fugitive secrets-leaker Edward Snowden to oversee its data protection. Snowden's lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, told Russian news service RIA Novosti that the former U.S. National Security Agency contractor starts his new job Friday . Kucherena declined to identify the social media site where Snowden will be working, citing "security reasons. " Snowden's Russian guardians have often expressed fears that U.S. intelligence operatives might snatch Snowden from his Russian refuge, if they can find him, and spirit him back to the United States to face espionage charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Please. Let's stop focusing on the overpaid, tormented young man who last week revealed the National Security Administration's Power Point Plan for Total Electronic World Domination. Let's focus instead on what our nation's wiretapping agency has actually been up to, whether America's technology giants have been complicit in an unprecedented and sweeping electronic intrusion and, most important, whether we think allowing the government access to our phone calls, email, video and voice chats, photos and file transfers is the price we must pay for security in the post 9/11 world.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Federal prosecutors have filed a criminal complaint charging self-proclaimed NSA leaker Edward Snowden with two violations of the Espionage Act and the theft of government property, the first step in a process they hope will bring him back to this country to face trial. The charges filed under the Espionage Act were unauthorized communication of national defense information and providing U.S. classified intelligence to an unauthorized person. The complaint was filed under seal June 14 in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., and made public Friday evening by government officials.
WORLD
August 1, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Edward Snowden finally managed to break free of his confinement at the transit zone of Moscow's international airport when he was granted Russian travel documents Thursday, after which he hopped in a cab and left for a secret location, his Russian lawyer said. “Edward was granted a one-year asylum and I just saw him to a taxi out of the airport,” Anatoly Kucherena said in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. “It is up to him to choose a residence inside Russia, but his location will remain secret for the duration of his stay.” “For the most wanted man on earth," Kucherena added, "personal safety is his No. 1 priority now.” Snowden, who is wanted by the United States for leaking highly classified documents from his work as a consultant for the National Security Agency, had been effectively trapped at Moscow's Sheremetyevo  International Airport since June 23, when he arrived on a flight from Hong Kong.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
When Edward Snowden disclosed NSA secrets, he sat down with reporter Glenn Greenwald to tell his story. Now Greenwald is writing a book that promises "new revelations. " Metropolitan Books will publish Greenwald's book in March 2014. The as-yet-untitled Snowden book will, Metropolitan promises, "contain new revelations exposing the extraordinary cooperation of private industry and the far-reaching consequences of the government's program, both domestically and abroad. " Snowden is the former U.S. government contractor who leaked information about the country's secret intelligence-gathering methods, which include surveillance of civilian communications, to Greenwald.
WORLD
June 24, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- An Aeroflot flight bound for Havana that was expected to be carrying Edward Snowden and an associate reportedly took off from Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Monday afternoon without the two on board, leaving the whereabouts of the former National Security Agency contractor wanted on espionage charges a mystery. As the plane started to roll across the tarmac for its takeoff after some delay, a correspondent for the Russian television news network Rossiya-24 who was on board the flight, reported that there was no sign of Snowden on board.
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