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SCIENCE
June 14, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Climate change is likely to wipe a lot of the white from those postcard winter scenes of Los Angeles ringed by snow-capped mountains, according to new research. A UCLA study released Friday projects a significant decline in snowfall on the ranges that provide a dramatic backdrop to urban Southern California. By mid-century, the amount of snow draping the mountains could decrease 30% to 40%, researchers say. If greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, the ranges could lose two-thirds of their snow by century's end. That means fewer and fewer days in coming decades will reflect the classic images of sun and snow that have idealized life in Southern California since 1920s citrus-crate labels beckoned to Easterners.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The greatest of all holiday specials, "A Charlie Brown Christmas," is on ABC at 8 tonight (Thursday). (It's also available to stream free via Hulu.) I wrote about it a few years back and, unable to say it any better, regift that review to you here. "A Charlie Brown Christmas" makes its yearly visit this week, in all its gorgeous melancholy. One of the first and still relatively few holiday perennials created by television, it remains, after nearly 50 years, as fresh as snowfall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The greatest of all holiday specials, "A Charlie Brown Christmas," is on ABC at 8 tonight (Thursday). (It's also available to stream free via Hulu.) I wrote about it a few years back and, unable to say it any better, regift that review to you here. "A Charlie Brown Christmas" makes its yearly visit this week, in all its gorgeous melancholy. One of the first and still relatively few holiday perennials created by television, it remains, after nearly 50 years, as fresh as snowfall.
TRAVEL
December 6, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
SOCHI, Russia - The chance snow report. Ticket sales. Train times. Terrorist threats. Construction problems. Civil rights. In this Olympic winter, there's plenty to talk about here. But if your host is translator and guide Anna Trotsenko, those topics probably aren't where the conversation is going to begin. "We're not Istanbul," Trotsenko said earlier this year, leading me through the heart of the town of Sochi. "We are not St. Petersburg. We are not Moscow. ... We are just a small resort city that is not very old. ... A very special city.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A fierce snowstorm swept across northern New England after burying parts of Massachusetts, dumping as much as 20 inches of snow in some places. At hundreds of schools, classes had to be canceled because of the storm. Meteorologists said 12 to 20 inches fell in southern Maine. About a foot fell in southern New Hampshire and areas west and north of Boston. Maine got pounded with some of the heaviest snowfall of the season: 20 inches in Gardiner, 16 inches in Denmark and 14 inches in Auburn, said Tom Berman of the National Weather Service in Gray.
NATIONAL
December 19, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Flights resumed in and out of Las Vegas, but schools and highways were closed after a record-setting snowfall coated marquees on the Strip, weighed down palm trees and blanketed surrounding mountain areas. The city awoke to clear weather after a storm that left 3.6 inches at McCarran International Airport. It was the biggest December snowfall on record there, and the worst for any month since a 7 1/2 -inch accumulation in January 1979, forecasters said.
NEWS
May 15, 1985 | Associated Press
A cold snap in Kazakhstan that sent temperatures plunging as much as 70 degrees over a few hours has blanketed the southern republic with snow and damaged grain and vegetable crops, Soviet media reported Tuesday.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A weekend storm blanketed Anchorage with 12.6 inches of snow, a record for one day. At Anchorage International Airport, 17.8 inches of snow has fallen in slightly more than two days, a record for October. Temperatures plunged to 28 degrees, breaking the low mark for the day that had stood since 1916. The Hilltop Ski Area in south Anchorage opened early, making it the first U.S. ski area to start operations on natural snow.
SPORTS
February 28, 1996 | BOB LOCHNER
Skiing's second season has arrived in the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountains. After struggling with erratic snowfall, warm temperatures and rain that forced closures last week, Southland ski areas are back in business, all white and fluffy with powder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
After Santa Ana winds and monster-size surf, a blast of cold air overnight Saturday was expected to generate another extreme weather phenomenon in the mountains: thundersnow. Saturday night, snowfall shut down Interstate 5 near Castaic, the California Highway Patrol reported. The southbound I-5 was closed starting on the northern end of the Grapevine, and the northbound lanes were shut down at Parker Road. Traffic was being diverted to highways 14 and 58.
SCIENCE
June 14, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Climate change is likely to wipe a lot of the white from those postcard winter scenes of Los Angeles ringed by snow-capped mountains, according to new research. A UCLA study released Friday projects a significant decline in snowfall on the ranges that provide a dramatic backdrop to urban Southern California. By mid-century, the amount of snow draping the mountains could decrease 30% to 40%, researchers say. If greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, the ranges could lose two-thirds of their snow by century's end. That means fewer and fewer days in coming decades will reflect the classic images of sun and snow that have idealized life in Southern California since 1920s citrus-crate labels beckoned to Easterners.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Alana Semuels
BOSTON -- Snow began falling throughout much of the Northeast on Friday morning, the first flurries of what forecasters are predicting will strengthen into a major blizzard, possibly bringing record accumulations of up to 3 feet of snow. The storm, which has been expected for days, began dropping snow Friday morning in the Boston area and in New York City, where relatively warm temperatures  turned the flakes to rain. The easy start to the day, however, was a just a lull, with heavy snow expected by evening along with hurricane-force winds in some areas still recovering from fall's Superstorm Sandy.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Ski resorts across the West are enjoying a flurry of winter storms, bolstering hopes for a blizzard of customers for resort operators and snow sport retailers. The recent winter bounty comes after a disastrous 2011-12 season, when snowfall across the country hit a 20-year low. "It's a very positive trend at this point," said Bob Roberts, president of the California Ski Industry Assn., a trade group for the state's 29 resorts. "To get early snow for the holidays is good news. " Ski resorts around Mammoth Mountain and Lake Tahoe reported that 16 to 19 inches of snow fell from Christmas Day to Wednesday morning, with more expected later in the week.
TRAVEL
December 9, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
MAMMOTH LAKES - Before we get to the early snow, the new businesses, the zipping skiers and beaming boarders at Mammoth Lakes, let's remember how bad things have been this year for this corner of the Eastern Sierra. First, Mother Nature delivered scant snow in the 2011-12 season, driving tourism down just as the larger economy seemed to be recovering. Then in June, management at Mammoth Mountain, the resort that dominates the town, trimmed staff, cut salaries and announced the shuttering of its June Mountain ski operation - a painful blow to the tiny mountain community of June Lake, 20 miles north of Mammoth.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The nation's ski industry suffered an epic wipeout last season, with the least snowfall in decades and one of the steepest drops in skier visits on record. But instead of retrenching, resort owners are opening their wallets wide on upgrades and expansions. One of the biggest jumps in spending is taking place at the snow-covered peaks around Lake Tahoe, where resorts are in the midst of a spending splurge of more than $100 million over the next five years. The flurry of spending began two years ago and includes a newly built on-mountain lodge at Northstar California and a mile-long terrain park at Alpine Meadows, plus new lifts and upgrades to snow-making equipment at several resorts.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Next time you get snowed in at the airport, you might want to blame the planes. A new report has found that planes flying through certain kinds of clouds can seed ice crystals and create additional snowfall. Conditions that allow this seeding effect occur up to 6% of the time at six airports assessed in the study, which was published in the journal Science. The extra snowfall is associated with odd-looking gashes and gaping holes seen in certain clouds — called "hole-punch" and "canal" clouds — that are formed by airplanes flying through them.
SPORTS
April 13, 2001 | MARTIN BECK
Skiers and snowboarders got a late-season gift last weekend and early this week when a cold spring storm dumped more than a foot of snow on the slopes. And because temperatures have stayed cool, the new snow is holding up well, according to ski area officials and others who have been up. "The snow was cold and squeaky under your boots," said Keith Tatsukawa of the Mt. Waterman ski patrol. "Some of the locals said it was some of the best skiing they have seen there in the last decade." The Mt.
SPORTS
February 16, 2001 | PETE THOMAS
Asked to assess the situation around the state in light of all the snow that fell earlier this week, Bob Roberts, executive director of the California Ski Industry Assn., responded via e-mail: "Blessed are the righteous for they shall receive seven feet of very dry snow. The gods have scored with another dandy storm just before a major holiday [Presidents Day] weekend." Perhaps, but the gods seemed to have overdone things a bit this time, especially in the San Gabriel Mountains.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2011 | Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Frigid winter weather rolling through the state in recent weeks may have rankled some Californians, but mountain snowstorms were a welcome sight for most skiers, snowboarders and ski resorts. And ski-lift operators are optimistic about the weeks ahead. With at least another month of skiing left in the season, resorts statewide are expecting crowds ? in some cases into the summer. Big Bear resorts, flush with powder, have shut down their snow making machines. In Lake Tahoe, with four feet of fresh snow from last weekend and two more feet expected this weekend, resorts are bracing for a rush of visitors this weekend and beyond.
NEWS
February 2, 2011 | By Richard Simon and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
A major storm moved through the Northeast on Wednesday morning after turning the Midwest into an ice-bejeweled wilderness where more than 100 million people tried to cope with the dislocation caused by record snowfalls and winds. The Federal Aviation Administration reported only scattered delays across the nation, but that was testimony to the airlines’ foresight. More than 11,000 flights were canceled in recent days as more than 30 states prepared for what the government called a storm of life-threatening proportions.
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