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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000
Re "U.S. to Curb Snowmobiles in Parks," April 27: Hooray for the National Park Service! My wife and I took a winter tour in Yellowstone Park three years ago. We saw numerous caravans of 40, 50 and 60 snowmobiles going in both directions, as shown in the photograph with your story. The noise was deafening, and after they all passed, the air was blue with exhaust smoke. Surviving a winter in Yellowstone is tough enough for a bison without having to keep dodging endless snowmobile traffic.
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NATIONAL
December 1, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
About this time of year there are precious few hours of daylight in the small town of St. Mary's in faraway western Alaska, and so it was already dark and frigid by the time paramedics arrived at the wreckage of a Cessna 208 airplane outside town. What they found Friday night was tragic: The plane carrying 10 people had crashed on a snowy slope, killing the pilot and three passengers - one of them an infant. But rescuers say there could have been more casualties if it weren't for the courage of one survivor - the infant's mother - who climbed out of the wreckage and trudged through the dark and icy fog to find rescuers, who had set out from town into the wilderness to look for the crash.
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NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Julie Cart
For nearly as long as snowmobiles have entered Yellowstone National Park, there have been complaints, with some groups citing air quality, intrusive noise and harassment of wildlife. New rules governing snowmobiles and snow coaches in the nation's oldest national park will be announced Friday -- the seventh effort at regulation since 1994.  With the new rules, park officials abandoned the longtime system of limiting the number of snow machines. Instead, they intend to manage "transportation events” -- counting groups of five to 10 snowmobiles traveling together as one event.
SPORTS
March 12, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
In the wake of the death of Caleb Moore, the X Games will eliminate the snowmobile and Moto X best trick competitions from future events. The safety of snowmobiles came under scrutiny in January after the death of Moore from injuries he sustained when his 450-pound sled rolled over him after a backflip gone wrong. It was the first death in the 18-year history of the X Games. The X Games still plans to hold other snowmobile events at Winter X, along with motorcycle competitions at Summer X. ESPN, which televises the X Games, announced the cancellations in a statement Tuesday.
NATIONAL
November 5, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
The number of snowmobiles in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks would be reduced 39% under a judge's ruling that the vehicles dirty the air and displace wildlife. The National Park Service proposed that 318 snowmobiles be allowed in Yellowstone per day and 50 be given access to Grand Teton. The public can comment until Nov. 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2000
The National Park Service deserves credit for its gutsy decision to ban snowmobiles in Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons ("Park Service Ruling Calls for Ban on Snowmobiles," Nov. 23). Snowmobiles should never have been allowed in national parks in the first place. Our national parks are not Disneyland; they are a refuge from the hectic, noisy and polluted lives that many of us lead. They give us the opportunity to rediscover nature in all her grandeur, to work up an honest sweat along the many trails, or to just spend some quiet moments contemplating the beauty that surrounds us. Snowmobiles and all other off-road vehicles, with their screaming engines and their foul exhaust fumes, ruin this kind of enjoyment.
NATIONAL
September 16, 2008 | From Times wire reports
A federal judge in Washington threw out plans to allow more than 500 snowmobiles a day into Yellowstone National Park, drawing sharp criticism from Wyoming's congressional delegation and snowmobiling advocates but praise from conservationists. The National Park Service's Winter Use Plan would have allowed 540 snowmobiles to go through Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks and the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway every day, starting this winter. But U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan ruled that the plan would increase air pollution, disturb wildlife and cause too much noise.
NEWS
September 30, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy
Now that the Bush administration has lifted a ban on snowmobiling in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, four former National Park Service directors are saying it's a major mistake. The former directors complained in a letter to Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton this month, saying the snowmobile industry had reneged on a promise to make its machines cleaner and quieter. Instead, they say, snowmobiles are dirtier than ever and the manufacturers are guilty of betrayal.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2007 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The National Park Service will allow as many as 540 snowmobiles a day to enter Yellowstone National Park -- a compromise that leaves neither environmentalists nor winter recreation advocates happy. The proposed cap is less than the current limit of 720 but nearly twice the number that have been entering the park in the last four years, and would reverse a trend of cleaner air and less noise, environmentalists and former park employees said.
NEWS
November 4, 2001 | BECKY BOHRER, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
For Gibson Bailey, colder weather signals the approach of snowmobile season--and sleepless nights that come with the roaring machines. "I look at my watch at 2, 4 o'clock in the morning and wonder, 'Why?' " he said. Bailey is among those supporting late-night restrictions on snowmobiles in town.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Julie Cart
For nearly as long as snowmobiles have entered Yellowstone National Park, there have been complaints, with some groups citing air quality, intrusive noise and harassment of wildlife. New rules governing snowmobiles and snow coaches in the nation's oldest national park will be announced Friday -- the seventh effort at regulation since 1994.  With the new rules, park officials abandoned the longtime system of limiting the number of snow machines. Instead, they intend to manage "transportation events” -- counting groups of five to 10 snowmobiles traveling together as one event.
SPORTS
February 1, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Winter X Games snowmobiler Caleb Moore, 25, died Thursday as a result of injuries suffered a week earlier in ESPN's popular action sports event in Aspen, Colo. Moore suffered internal bleeding around his heart and also a brain injury when his 450-pound vehicle failed to complete a flip off a 70-foot ramp and slammed atop his head and chest area. The death of the four-time X Games medalist was the first in the event's 17-year history. It brought an outpouring of condolences on Twitter from action-sports stars including Travis Pastrana, Jeremy "Twitch" Stenberg and Carey Hart.
SPORTS
January 31, 2013 | By Melissa Rohlin
Winter X Games competitor Caleb Moore died Thursday morning in a Colorado hospital a week after his snowmobile crashed during an event. He was 25 years old.  Moore crashed last Thursday while attempting a backflip on a 70-foot ramp during a freestyle event. During his landing, the skis on his 450-pound snowmobile hit the snow, sending Moore flying over the handlebars. Moore landed face first onto the ground; then his snowmobile rolled over him. Moore walked off the course and went to a hospital to be treated for a concussion, but his condition quickly worsened.
SPORTS
January 30, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire, Los Angeles Times
The snowmobile accident that has left Winter X Games competitor Caleb Moore near death in a Colorado hospital renews questions about the lines of risk that sport should cross. Moore, 25, remained in critical condition Tuesday in Grand Junction, Colo., after having failed to convert a flip off a 70-foot ramp with his 450-pound snowmobile in Aspen on Thursday. After completing five tricks, including a midair full-body stretch from the handlebars and a flip around his seat, Moore flew over the handlebars headfirst into the snow after the front skis of his snowmobile dug into a landing ramp.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
  Snowmobiler Caleb Moore remains in critical condition in a Colorado hospital after his snowmobile crash Thursday at the Winter X Games in Aspen. The 25-year-old was performing a flip when he landed short and went over the handlebars. The snowmobile rolled over him. He walked off the course and went to the hospital, where he developed bleeding around his heart. On Sunday, members of his family said he had a secondary complication involving his brain, but did not give details.
SPORTS
January 28, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
  So there you are, minding your own business, watching the snowmobile trick competition at the X Games. Jackson Strong is at the top of the course, but you are way off to the side. Nothing bad could happen. Then Strong attempts his trick and falls off the snowmobile. Unfortunately for you, the throttle is stuck open and the machine careens off course, right toward you. That happened Sunday night at the X Games Aspen. A young male fan was injured when he tried to get out of the way of the snowmobile.
NEWS
February 15, 2005
Regarding "A Line in the Snow" [Feb. 15]: As times and circumstances have changed, activities that were once considered acceptable have been banned because of their deleterious effects. Sheep grazing has been forbidden in the San Bernardino National Forest since the early 1900s. Duck hunting was allowed on Lake Arrowhead until the 1950s. The keeping of pigs in the lower part of Manhattan was outlawed in the 1840s over the strong objections of the poor, who valued the animals for food and garbage disposal.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A North Dakota man snowmobiling with a friend was buried in an avalanche near Cooke City and died, authorities said. Andrew Greicar, 21, of Pisek died when he and his machine were buried near Wolverine Pass northwest of Cooke City, said Park County Sheriff Clark Carpenter. The avalanche risk for the area is rated "high" because of recent heavy snow. The death was the first avalanche fatality in Montana this season.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
The Iron Dog has begun. Yes, there is Alaska's world-famous Iditarod race that runs each year from Anchorage to Nome, but those are mere dogs compared with this annual test of men, metal, ice and lunacy. The world's longest and most grueling snowmobile race got under way over the weekend in the town of Big Lake, near Wasilla. It is scheduled to proceed more than 2,000 miles across frozen lakes, hills, forests and tundra to Nome and then on to a finish in Fairbanks, nearly a week after the start.
WORLD
March 15, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
At least two people were killed and 30 injured after a massive avalanche smothered a high-risk snowmobile rally in southern British Columbia, police said Sunday. "It's certainly a small miracle that we didn't end up with a complete, massive group buried under the snow," said Cpl. Dan Moskaluk of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Most of the estimated 200 spectators and participants were accounted for, he said. An avalanche 150 yards wide and as much as 1.6 miles long thundered down a steep snow bowl at the Canadian Rocky Mountain resort of Revelstoke, where competitors were attempting to scale the treacherous slope on high-powered snow machines during an unsanctioned rally Saturday afternoon.
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