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SPORTS
June 30, 2002 | Mike Terry
vs. Houston, 1 p.m. ESPN 2 Site--Staples Center. Radio--KPLS (830). Records--Sparks 12-1, Comets 11-3. Record vs. Comets--1-0. Update--This game has more subplots than the Soap Opera Channel. The Comets want to end the Sparks' 28-game home winning streak, because Los Angeles is the only team to beat Houston on its home court this season.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 1999 | From Bloomberg News
ABC said its affiliated television stations agreed to help pay for the network's "Monday Night Football" broadcast in exchange for more advertising time and a stake in the Walt Disney Co. unit's new Soap Opera Channel. The three-year accord calls for the stations to pay ABC $45 million a year and to give ABC 10 local ad spots during Saturday morning children's programs.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC's board of affiliates has agreed to a wide-ranging deal that for the first time would allow the network to reuse certain prime-time, sports, soap opera and news programming on other distribution outlets such as cable channels or the Internet. Under the settlement announced Monday, the board also agreed to help offset the cost of "Monday Night Football" in exchange for additional advertising inventory and a stake in a new soap opera cable channel.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The competition among the proposed all-news channels is so intense that News Corp. is offering to pay cable systems $10 per subscriber, and in some cases $11, for carrying its new network, according to cable executives. While it is not unusual for new programming services to give cable operators an incentive for coverage, the price News Corp. is paying far exceeds those offered in the past, when there were fewer channels vying for space. QVC Inc.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television networks, beleaguered by declining market share and a fracturing audience, got advice this week from the broadcast industry's major rivals. In an unusual twist, the same satellite, Internet and cable companies that have eroded broadcasters' dominance over television were the top-billed panelists and keynote speakers at the industry's annual convention.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling an escalation in the friction between TV networks with their affiliates, Walt Disney Co. said Thursday that it would launch a new channel that will allow cable and satellite subscribers to watch soap operas at night that air during the day on its ABC network.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Live Oak Music Festival, a three-day epic featuring all sorts of eclectic acts, will offer those in attendance a chance to slurp and slug under the oaks up the road apiece from Santa Barbara. The site is approximately 10 miles north of Santa Barbara on Highway 154. There's no address, but that's why there are signs. Acoustic music fans can thrill to the gigs by the Cache Valley Drifters, the Acousticats and Tom Ball & Kenny Sultan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you find yourself up at 2:30 in the morning feeding the baby, cramming for a college exam, or just getting home from a late-night movie shoot or waitress job, flip on the TV these days and you might encounter Jay Leno, lampooning events from the week before. No, you're not hallucinating. Having access to "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" at that ungodly hour represents NBC's new approach to the wee-morning hours, repeating daytime and late-night fare from 2 to 5 a.m.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC sent a letter to its affiliates Friday demanding that they chip in for the expensive contract for "Monday Night Football" or face a series of harsher consequences, including the loss of lucrative advertising time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just like barbecues and beach parties, TV reruns have become one of the traditional signposts that summer has arrived. With summer ratings wilting, however, some broadcasters are trumpeting the need for more original first-run offerings, while others--citing the economic imperative to air reruns--seek ways to get more mileage out of their repeats by using the seemingly oxymoronic concept of "new reruns."
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