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Soap Operas

ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Out of the early morning fog that lingers on the still waters by the lumber mill, the town's blonde, teen-age beauty queen, meticulously shrouded in a white plastic tarp, her cherubic face washed deathly white, her full lips drained of color, floats gently ashore--her youthful sexuality more alluring in death than in life.
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WORLD
August 15, 2010 | By Nasry Esmat, Los Angeles Times
As Egyptian TV channels wage a fierce fight to win audiences and advertising money during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, some imams worry that the bombardment of soap operas and historical dramas will distract Muslims from performing their religious traditions. Ramadan began Wednesday, and Egyptian TV and independent satellite channels promptly began showing 48 new soap operas and nearly the same number of other programs produced specially for the holy month. Millions of Egyptians watch soap operas after breaking their fast following sunset and before beginning it again after morning prayers.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is not a soap opera town, but it plays one on TV. NBC's upcoming daytime drama, "Sunset Beach," which is shot on location here, is all trysts and tricks in a hip small town. The show, which premieres Monday and runs every weekday, is expected to bring a flood of curious tourists here in search of the real "Sunset Beach" (Motto: "This is the land romance built") or the real lifeguard Michael ("Nowhere in the world is safer than in this man's arms," NBC proclaims).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the United States, soap operas are generally thought of strictly as entertainment. But a New York-based advocacy group has convinced networks and producers in more than a dozen other countries to use daily serials to promote its pet cause: population control. "We're in the business of conditioning attitudes," said Sonny Fox, a longtime producer of children's television in the United States and a member of the board of the organization, Population Communications International.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1991 | STEVEN HERBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Dallas," the long-running soap opera about a Texas oil family that helped define television in the 1980s and provoked an international guessing game over who shot J.R. Ewing, was canceled Wednesday. CBS said that it will have its final broadcast with a two-hour episode May 3. Larry Hagman, who starred as the dastardly tycoon J.R.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | JOHN NEEDHAM and ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a marriage of technology and tragedy, afternoon television viewers were switched away from soap operas and reruns Friday to watch police chase a suspected murderer along the freeways of Los Angeles and Orange counties, finally shooting him to death in a showdown that was broadcast live.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2008 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Ellen Wheeler knows a thing or two about reinvention and survival. In the 1980s, the Emmy-winning actress portrayed twins Marley and Vicky Love Hudson on the soap opera "Another World." She moved to "All My Children" as one of the first characters on TV with AIDS. In the late 1990s, she reprised her role as Marley Hudson on "Another World."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1995 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The greatest TV soap opera of them all, which for most of this year threatened to maim all the others, has been dark now for more than two months. And the executives who nurture all those fictitious daytime dramas, who just last summer were fretting about the long-term health of their programs, are a bit stunned by the resiliency of their aging serial fantasies. The long-running murder trial of O.J. Simpson--carried full time on CNN, Court TV and E!
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | SAM FARMER, Times Staff Writer
Although he knew he should have been lifting weights in preparation for the track and field season, Steve Barnett spent countless afternoons during the fall of 1987 sprawled on a couch in his Glendale home, eating junk food, with his eyes glued to "Days of Our Lives." When the program ended, Barnett would invariably nod off and awaken long after his Glendale College teammates had finished their workout. Barnett's obsession with soap operas was apropos--his freshman year, to that point, was a washout.
NEWS
June 10, 2002 | CLAUDIA ROSENBAUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The parents anxiously await the DNA results on their switched-at-birth child, a missing woman miraculously stumbles into her own funeral, and a teenager discovers her mother hid an Internet Web camera in her boyfriend's apartment. Welcome to Soapland. The never-never daytime world where everyone looks great whether they are comatose, locked up at Statesville prison or getting married to the evil twin.
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