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Sober Living Homes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday ordered an immediate investigation into allegations of substandard conditions and abuse of residents at unlicensed sober-living homes. Exploitation of recovering alcoholics and drug addicts by some operators of the privately run homes was reported in a Times series last week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Emily Foxhall
Newport Beach plans to petition the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a lower court decision that determined its ordinance regulating group homes is discriminatory. The City Council voted unanimously during a closed session meeting Tuesday to pursue the petition, the Daily Pilot reported . At stake is an ongoing argument over whether group homes in Newport Beach can challenge the municipal ordinance limiting homes for recovering alcoholics and drug addicts at trial. Many of the homes were forced out of the city by strict limits enacted in 2008 that were fueled by residents who complained about parking, traffic, cigarette smoke, noise and an ever-changing cast of neighbors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992
A statewide registry of sober-living homes to protect recovering alcoholics and addicts from abuse could be in place by early 1993, according to the California Assn. of Alcohol Recovery Homes. Twenty years ago, the nonprofit group helped the state draft its first laws regulating alcohol and drug recovery homes. The registry plan comes after reports in The Times of widespread profiteering by some operators of privately run sober-living houses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- A Newport Beach ordinance designed to curb or eliminate group homes for recovering addicts may have illegally discriminated against people based on disability, a federal appeals court ruled unanimously Friday. The decision by the U.S. 9thCircuit Court of Appeals revived lawsuits against the city by operators of group homes that lost money or had to shut down as a result of the 2008 ordinance. The three-judge panel's ruling also cleared the way for group home operators to receive financial compensation from Newport Beach and served as a warning to other cities that might want to eliminate such operations in residential neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles County officials found health and safety hazards in one of every three "sober-living" homes inspected since October, according to a report released Thursday. Despite deficiencies, officials concluded that there is no need for additional monitoring and inspections of the unlicensed, privately run houses that provide drug-free shelter to recovering addicts and alcoholics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- A Newport Beach ordinance designed to curb or eliminate group homes for recovering addicts may have illegally discriminated against people based on disability, a federal appeals court ruled unanimously Friday. The decision by the U.S. 9thCircuit Court of Appeals revived lawsuits against the city by operators of group homes that lost money or had to shut down as a result of the 2008 ordinance. The three-judge panel's ruling also cleared the way for group home operators to receive financial compensation from Newport Beach and served as a warning to other cities that might want to eliminate such operations in residential neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
The company's brochure features an aerial shot of the Balboa Peninsula and describes its 90-day drug and alcohol recovery program as "located in the warm, healing climate of Southern California." It's that kind of promise -- in this case from Sober Living by the Sea -- that has made Newport Beach an unlikely capital for drug- and alcohol-free homes.
OPINION
May 24, 2012 | By Jonathan Hunter and Autumn M. Elliott
Los Angeles has made slow but significant progress toward ending homelessness, but the City Council is about to vote on a proposed law that could stop that momentum in its tracks. The Community Care Facilities Ordinance would threaten the well-being of thousands of people with disabilities, create a nightmare for property owners, cost taxpayers more, violate principles of fair housing and jeopardize access to federal funds. The proposed ordinance grew out of an effort to eliminate sober-living homes in residential neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1992
The Times is to be commended for its recent articles (Oct. 21-22) calling attention to the rip-off of residents by the owners or managers of some sober-living homes. Taking advantage of addict-alcoholics, who are desperately trying to recover from their disease, is one of the basest examples of human greed. It's also a shocking social reality that needs exposing. However, the articles failed to clearly delineate certain aspects of a complex situation.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | JACK LEONARD and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sober living homes were created with the best of intentions: to offer recovering drug addicts and alcoholics--many of them just out of jail--a clean environment to help kick their habit. But with the number of such transitional homes doubling across California in the last decade, communities are rising up in protest against some facilities they consider anything but therapeutic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Jason Wells
A Sacramento woman who tortured her incarcerated fiance's 12-year-old daughter with staples, hot irons and electrical cords was sentenced to life in prison Thursday. Duewa Abeana Lee, 37, was convicted in July of torture and other felony counts related to a period of abuse in 2011 that ended when the victim asked a stranger at the Department of Motor Vehicles for help. Sacramento Superior Court Judge Cheryl Chun Meegan said during the sentencing hearing that "there are no words, really" to describe what she called “horrific, unspeakable abuse” and the “relentless cruelty” the girl suffered, the Sacramento Bee reported.
OPINION
May 24, 2012 | By Jonathan Hunter and Autumn M. Elliott
Los Angeles has made slow but significant progress toward ending homelessness, but the City Council is about to vote on a proposed law that could stop that momentum in its tracks. The Community Care Facilities Ordinance would threaten the well-being of thousands of people with disabilities, create a nightmare for property owners, cost taxpayers more, violate principles of fair housing and jeopardize access to federal funds. The proposed ordinance grew out of an effort to eliminate sober-living homes in residential neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Following Newport Beach's preliminary courtroom victory against drug and alcohol treatment homes, many facilities are scrambling to comply with the city's strict new ordinance by today's deadline. Other operators, however, are labeling the process discriminatory and are refusing to obey the court order or are grudgingly filing the required paperwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2008 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
The company's brochure features an aerial shot of the Balboa Peninsula and describes its 90-day drug and alcohol recovery program as "located in the warm, healing climate of Southern California." It's that kind of promise -- in this case from Sober Living by the Sea -- that has made Newport Beach an unlikely capital for drug- and alcohol-free homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wanda Davis was young, but she never forgot the worn-out gazes on the faces of the women who stood outside the Ding Dong Motel, a 16-room flophouse on a busy stretch of South Figueroa Street where the prostitution and drug trades have flourished for decades. She was 11 when her family moved into a small wood-framed house next door and her bedroom window looked out on the nightly commotion. "I could hear women crying," she recalled.
NEWS
May 21, 2000 | JACK LEONARD and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sober living homes were created with the best of intentions: to offer recovering drug addicts and alcoholics--many of them just out of jail--a clean environment to help kick their habit. But with the number of such transitional homes doubling across California in the last decade, communities are rising up in protest against some facilities they consider anything but therapeutic.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Los Feliz, as many as 55 recovering drug addicts and alcoholics are living in a single home, some packed 10 to a room, others squeezed into attic crawl spaces or closets. In South-Central Los Angeles, men struggling to stay off drugs surrender their welfare checks to sleep on plywood pallets in bare cubicles with exposed wiring. And on a shady street in Van Nuys, women seek shelter in the home of a therapist who has been accused of demanding sexual favors from female tenants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Jason Wells
A Sacramento woman who tortured her incarcerated fiance's 12-year-old daughter with staples, hot irons and electrical cords was sentenced to life in prison Thursday. Duewa Abeana Lee, 37, was convicted in July of torture and other felony counts related to a period of abuse in 2011 that ended when the victim asked a stranger at the Department of Motor Vehicles for help. Sacramento Superior Court Judge Cheryl Chun Meegan said during the sentencing hearing that "there are no words, really" to describe what she called “horrific, unspeakable abuse” and the “relentless cruelty” the girl suffered, the Sacramento Bee reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2000 | PETER M. WARREN and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The state on Monday joined local agencies in probing allegations of drug use at a Santa Ana alcohol-and-drug treatment center, where dozens of residents were ousted over the weekend. Officials at the state Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, which licenses residential treatment facilities, confirmed that an investigation was underway involving the treatment center, on North Cooper Street, operated by Cooper Fellowship Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL and PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles County officials found health and safety hazards in one of every three "sober-living" homes inspected since October, according to a report released Thursday. Despite deficiencies, officials concluded that there is no need for additional monitoring and inspections of the unlicensed, privately run houses that provide drug-free shelter to recovering addicts and alcoholics.
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