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Sobhi Tufeili

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NEWS
February 1, 1998 | From Reuters
The Lebanese army launched a massive manhunt Saturday for fiery cleric Sheik Sobhi Tufeili after clashes with his radical supporters in which at least 50 people were killed or wounded. Troops sealed off the anti-Westerner's home village of Britel in eastern Lebanon after routing his forces in battles that erupted in the town of Baalbek on Friday.
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NEWS
August 13, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT and KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A little more than a decade after its emergence unleashed one of the deadliest waves of extremism ever witnessed in the Middle East, Lebanon's Hezbollah is going legit. Once a clandestine movement with unknown leaders, Hezbollah now is a legal political party and part of the largest bloc in Lebanon's Parliament. Once heard from only via anonymous phone calls and unsigned communiques, it now communicates through a small media empire including two television and four radio stations.
NEWS
October 4, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Manal Karaki has bright eyes, a slightly crooked smile and the quick wit of a 20-year-old college student who wants a career in television. America says she supports terrorism. Haida is a 25-year-old college graduate who volunteers on weekends selling discounted school supplies to low-income families. America says he promotes terrorism.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, This article was reported by Times staff writers Tracy Wilkinson in Buenos Aires, Kim Murphy in Beirut, William Tuohy in London, Robin Wright in Washington and Mary Curtius and Michael Parks in Jerusalem and special correspondent Marilyn Raschka in Beirut. It was written by Parks
A white delivery van parks on a Monday morning in front of a building in downtown Buenos Aires that houses many of Argentina's Jewish organizations. A few minutes later, a quarter-ton of explosives in the van are detonated, demolishing the building. Ninety-six people are killed, 230 are wounded. A day later, a man believed to be Lebanese and using a crudely forged U.S. passport boards a small commuter plane in Panama--and shortly after takeoff blows it up with a bomb he is carrying.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen years after Iran's revolution launched militant Islam as a powerful modern political force, the broader Islamist movement has fractured, deeply, into diverse and often disparate strains--in some cases even rivalries. The emerging Islamist spectrum in the mid-1990s ranges from the religious right elected to Kuwait's Parliament, where it is demanding sexually segregated classrooms and accountable government, to Egyptian militants trying to overthrow a secular state.
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