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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1987
I was very offended by Rosenberg's review. I first learned of Sobibor 30 years ago from a survivor. I would have respected Rosenberg's commentary if, instead, he had questioned why it took so many years to bring the story to TV. Rosenberg's comments minimize and diminish the experience and pain of those who suffered this horror. His remarks were unjustified and obscene. ELLIE SOMERFIELD Burbank
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from London -- John Demjanjuk, a retired Ohio autoworker convicted of serving as a guard at a Nazi extermination camp and being complicit in the deaths of more than 28,000 people, died Saturday in Germany. He was 91. Demjanjuk died in a nursing home in southern Germany as a prisoner of failing health but not of the justice system that found him guilty last year of being an accessory to mass murder. A German judge had sentenced him to five years behind bars, but he was allowed his freedom while he launched an appeal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
We get letters . . . angry ones: The mail was about 50-50 on a recent column about "Wheel of Fortune" letter-turner Vanna White, the anti's finding my comments cruel and vicious. Other readers found me flip and unfeeling when commenting about the Holocaust TV movie "Escape From Sobibor." And there's more. Look what you tried to do to Vanna in your sarcastic review of her book or tape or whatever the poor woman has released. Sure, we know she didn't go to Vassar. You may even know her father abandoned her in infancy and she was raised in poverty.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
John Demjanjuk, a 91-year-old retired autoworker from Ohio, was found guilty of accessory to murder and sentenced to five years in prison by a German court Thursday for his part in the killings of about 28,000 Jews at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. Judge Ralph Alt said he would allow Demjanjuk to be free pending an expected appeal. The defendant attended court in a wheelchair and the 18-month trial had been suspended several times because of his poor health. His lawyer, Ulrich Busch, was quoted by the Associated Press as saying his client was "just a scapegoat for the Germans; he has to pay for all the mistakes they made in the past and that's not justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1987
I was shocked and hurt by Howard Rosenberg's cynical, ho-hum attitude about works on the Holocaust in his review of "Escape From Sobibor" (Television Times, April 12). CBS was providing us with more of a public service than a "commercial" event. We must never become blase about the Holocaust, both out of respect for its millions of victims and to avoid such tragedies in the future. We must be honest with our children and teach them about how man's dark side, if left unchecked, can lead to the horrors of Nazism.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2002 | TOM TUGEND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Sobibor, October 14, 1943, 4 p.m." is a documentary by French director Claude Lanzmann, whose title pinpoints the exact date and time for the start of the only successful uprising and escape by Jews at any Nazi extermination camp during the Holocaust.
WORLD
July 14, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The legal saga of John Demjanjuk neared its final chapter as prosecutors set the stage for one of Germany's highest-profile war crime trials in years -- formally charging the retired U.S. autoworker with involvement in the murder of 27,900 people at a Nazi death camp. The Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk was once sentenced in Israel to death, then acquitted by the country's Supreme Court in 1993 of being the notorious "Ivan the Terrible" at the Treblinka death camp. Now the 89-year-old stands accused of being part of the death machine at another camp in Poland -- Sobibor -- and a Germany more than 60 years removed from World War II will revisit the demons of its past once again.
WORLD
December 4, 2009 | By Kate Connolly
Martin Haas struggled to hold back tears as he recalled how in 1943 his life was saved thanks only to the actions of a quick-thinking family friend. "I remember that it was a rainy day," the 73-year-old UC San Diego oncologist said in slow but measured German. "The woman hid me under her cape, and took me away just in time." The 7-year-old Haas found shelter with a Catholic family in the Dutch countryside as the German Gestapo began rounding up members of his family and other Jews in the Netherlands, he said this week in a Munich, Germany, courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
The story of Holocaust survivors ("What if History Suffers Amnesia?" Sept. 29) was an important and moving piece. As a scholar who is studying resistance, I have interviewed and am interviewing former Jewish resistance fighters. Their stories were not so welcome. Their stories are still often not welcome today. In fact, most Jewish and Gentile Americans are completely unaware of the degree of Jewish resistance to the Holocaust. As many as 60,000 Jews joined partisan units (including wholly Jewish units)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from London -- John Demjanjuk, a retired Ohio autoworker convicted of serving as a guard at a Nazi extermination camp and being complicit in the deaths of more than 28,000 people, died Saturday in Germany. He was 91. Demjanjuk died in a nursing home in southern Germany as a prisoner of failing health but not of the justice system that found him guilty last year of being an accessory to mass murder. A German judge had sentenced him to five years behind bars, but he was allowed his freedom while he launched an appeal.
WORLD
February 6, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The witness has grown old and sick. He sits propped on pillows while the snow piles up outside. Recovering from a stroke, he languishes in a cramped apartment because his legs are too frail to negotiate five flights of stairs. His name is Alexei Vaitsen. He is one of the few Jews to survive the torments of the Nazis' Sobibor death camp and the only member of his family who lived to see the end of World War II. His thoughts these days are hundreds of miles away, in a distant courtroom where the fate of another sick old man is being weighed.
WORLD
December 4, 2009 | By Kate Connolly
Martin Haas struggled to hold back tears as he recalled how in 1943 his life was saved thanks only to the actions of a quick-thinking family friend. "I remember that it was a rainy day," the 73-year-old UC San Diego oncologist said in slow but measured German. "The woman hid me under her cape, and took me away just in time." The 7-year-old Haas found shelter with a Catholic family in the Dutch countryside as the German Gestapo began rounding up members of his family and other Jews in the Netherlands, he said this week in a Munich, Germany, courtroom.
WORLD
July 14, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The legal saga of John Demjanjuk neared its final chapter as prosecutors set the stage for one of Germany's highest-profile war crime trials in years -- formally charging the retired U.S. autoworker with involvement in the murder of 27,900 people at a Nazi death camp. The Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk was once sentenced in Israel to death, then acquitted by the country's Supreme Court in 1993 of being the notorious "Ivan the Terrible" at the Treblinka death camp. Now the 89-year-old stands accused of being part of the death machine at another camp in Poland -- Sobibor -- and a Germany more than 60 years removed from World War II will revisit the demons of its past once again.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2002 | TOM TUGEND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Sobibor, October 14, 1943, 4 p.m." is a documentary by French director Claude Lanzmann, whose title pinpoints the exact date and time for the start of the only successful uprising and escape by Jews at any Nazi extermination camp during the Holocaust.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Laemmle's current--and best--Documentary Days series concludes with Claude Lanzmann's "Sobibor: October 14, 1943, 4 p.m.," an important footnote to Lanzmann's great 9 1/2-hour Holocaust documentary "Shoah" (1985). The story of the uprising and escape of Jews in the extermination camp in Sobibor, Poland, is told through an interview with a key participant, Yehuda Lerner, that Lanzmann filmed in 1979 for "Shoah."
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Polish researchers said they have discovered mass graves at Sobibor, a death camp in eastern Poland that was razed by the Nazis after inmates staged an uprising. Seven mass graves and the sites where several buildings stood were found, said Andrzej Kola, an archeology professor supervising what he said was the first thorough study of the former camp. Some 250,000 people, most of them Jews, are believed to have died at the site.
NEWS
November 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Polish researchers said they have discovered mass graves at Sobibor, a death camp in eastern Poland that was razed by the Nazis after inmates staged an uprising. Seven mass graves and the sites where several buildings stood were found, said Andrzej Kola, an archeology professor supervising what he said was the first thorough study of the former camp. Some 250,000 people, most of them Jews, are believed to have died at the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1996
The story of Holocaust survivors ("What if History Suffers Amnesia?" Sept. 29) was an important and moving piece. As a scholar who is studying resistance, I have interviewed and am interviewing former Jewish resistance fighters. Their stories were not so welcome. Their stories are still often not welcome today. In fact, most Jewish and Gentile Americans are completely unaware of the degree of Jewish resistance to the Holocaust. As many as 60,000 Jews joined partisan units (including wholly Jewish units)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
We get letters . . . angry ones: The mail was about 50-50 on a recent column about "Wheel of Fortune" letter-turner Vanna White, the anti's finding my comments cruel and vicious. Other readers found me flip and unfeeling when commenting about the Holocaust TV movie "Escape From Sobibor." And there's more. Look what you tried to do to Vanna in your sarcastic review of her book or tape or whatever the poor woman has released. Sure, we know she didn't go to Vassar. You may even know her father abandoned her in infancy and she was raised in poverty.
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