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Sobibor Poland

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NEWS
November 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Polish researchers said they have discovered mass graves at Sobibor, a death camp in eastern Poland that was razed by the Nazis after inmates staged an uprising. Seven mass graves and the sites where several buildings stood were found, said Andrzej Kola, an archeology professor supervising what he said was the first thorough study of the former camp. Some 250,000 people, most of them Jews, are believed to have died at the site.
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NEWS
November 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Polish researchers said they have discovered mass graves at Sobibor, a death camp in eastern Poland that was razed by the Nazis after inmates staged an uprising. Seven mass graves and the sites where several buildings stood were found, said Andrzej Kola, an archeology professor supervising what he said was the first thorough study of the former camp. Some 250,000 people, most of them Jews, are believed to have died at the site.
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NEWS
December 1, 2002 | Anthony Deutsch, Associated Press Writer
Dutch bounty hunters in the pay of the Nazis captured thousands of Dutch men, women and children during World War II and sent them to their deaths in concentration camps, a new book says. "A Price on Their Heads," by Dutch author Ad van Liempt, highlights a dark page in Dutch history -- a band of 54 middle-aged men who scoured the land in search of Jews in hiding. Van Liempt asserts that 8,000 to 9,000 people -- three times more than earlier estimates -- were turned in for cash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | NORMAN MENACHEM FEDER, Norman Menachem Feder, an associate at a law firm in New York, clerked at the Supreme Court of Israel.
New evidence in the case of former U.S. citizen John Demjanjuk may force the Supreme Court of Israel to reverse a Nazi war-crimes conviction that was based largely on eyewitness testimony. If that happens, revisionists will celebrate the ostensible demise of Holocaust historiography. After all, while much of the methodology of the Holocaust is documented, our knowledge of the brutality of the Holocaust depends significantly on survivors' stories.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former chief of the Justice Department division charged with pursuing Nazi war criminals denied Friday that the department "stonewalled" defense attorneys seeking evidence to clear their client. Lawyers for John Demjanjuk contend that as a result of the department's suppression of evidence, the 72-year-old retired auto worker from Cleveland was wrongly extradited to Israel, where he was convicted of war crimes in 1988.
NEWS
April 25, 1995 | KATHRYN BOLD
Holocaust survivors joined more than 300 people Wednesday in remembering Anne Frank, who died 50 years ago at the age of 15 in a German concentration camp. A reception was held for the opening of "Anne Frank in the World," an educational exhibit at the Newport Harbor Art Museum Library Annex in Newport Beach that re-creates Anne's life and times through 500 photographs, commentaries and facsimiles of the diary she kept while she and her family hid from the Nazis.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Laemmle's current--and best--Documentary Days series concludes with Claude Lanzmann's "Sobibor: October 14, 1943, 4 p.m.," an important footnote to Lanzmann's great 9 1/2-hour Holocaust documentary "Shoah" (1985). The story of the uprising and escape of Jews in the extermination camp in Sobibor, Poland, is told through an interview with a key participant, Yehuda Lerner, that Lanzmann filmed in 1979 for "Shoah."
NATIONAL
November 30, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
Nearly three decades after the United States first accused him of being a Nazi death camp guard, retired Ohio autoworker John Demjanjuk appeared in court Tuesday to fight deportation, with his lawyers arguing he would face torture if returned to his native Ukraine. Demjanjuk lost his American citizenship in 2002 after a federal judge found that World War II documents proved he had worked as a guard at several camps in Poland.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clearing the way for accused Nazi death camp guard John Demjanjuk to return to the United States, Atty. Gen. Janet Reno said Wednesday that the government would not ask the Supreme Court to bar the retired Cleveland auto worker from re-entering the country while his deportation is reviewed.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-four years ago this summer, the U.S. Justice Department made a remarkable allegation: One of World War II's most notorious and malevolent practitioners of genocide was not only alive and well, he was living in Cleveland. "Ivan the Terrible," the government said, who drunkenly beat Jews as they entered the gas chambers at Treblinka, then turned on the gas himself before heading out to rape local girls, now had a wife, two children and a yellow-brick house in the suburbs.
OPINION
December 9, 2005 | Daniel Jonah Goldhagen
JOHN DEMJANJUK, the Nazi death camp guard who has lived in the United States since falsifying his entry papers in 1952, is again in the news, facing deportation to Germany or perhaps Ukraine, his country of origin. Demjanjuk has been extradited once, to Israel, where the Supreme Court in 1993 overturned his conviction and death sentence, saying that he was not, in fact, Ivan the Terrible, an infamous guard at the Treblinka death camp.
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