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December 19, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Abby Wambach's game-tying goal in the closing minutes of stoppage time against Brazil in the 2011 World Cup quarterfinals has been voted the best moment in U.S. soccer history. To commemorate its centennial year, U.S. soccer has been asking fans to chose all-star teams for both the U.S. men and women and to select the best overall moment. Wambach's goal, a header off a cross from Megan Rapinoe, came with the Americans less than two minutes from World Cup elimination. The U.S. went on to win that match on penalty kicks before losing to Japan on penalty kicks in the World Cup final.
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SPORTS
December 19, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Abby Wambach's game-tying goal in the closing minutes of stoppage time against Brazil in the 2011 World Cup quarterfinals has been voted the best moment in U.S. soccer history. To commemorate its centennial year, U.S. soccer has been asking fans to chose all-star teams for both the U.S. men and women and to select the best overall moment. Wambach's goal, a header off a cross from Megan Rapinoe, came with the Americans less than two minutes from World Cup elimination. The U.S. went on to win that match on penalty kicks before losing to Japan on penalty kicks in the World Cup final.
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SPORTS
October 26, 1996
Last night I went to Q's Billiards in Pasadena and spoke with some of the Los Angeles Galaxy soccer players. Although they lost the MLS final on Sunday, they deserve all the credit in the world. As disappointed as they were, they knew that they had made soccer history. They played in a great final. Great goals were scored. The game ended in a dramatic sudden-death overtime. The stars of the game were both American and foreign players--just like our country. Most of all, the American people accepted soccer.
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Landon Donovan is a complicated man who plays a simple game. And that can lead to unexpected consequences. When others celebrate, he broods. When others smile, he scowls. And when others began preparing for the World Cup last winter, he walked away from soccer, saying he needed a break after playing nonstop for nearly 12 years. It was an unprecedented move for a player in the prime of his career, one that Donovan, even 10 months later, still can't define. "I didn't have a specific explanation as to why I needed to get away.
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Standout goalkeeper Hope Solo was left off the U.S. team for next month's Algarve Cup in Portugal to have a long-standing wrist injury treated. Solo, generally considered the best women's goalkeeper in the world, has been playing with ligament damage in her left wrist. But the injury worsened recently and with qualifying for the 2015 World Cup more than a year off, the national team's medical staff recommended Solo treat the injury now, perhaps through surgery. Nicole Barnhart, Ashlyn Harris and Jill Loyden were the three keepers named to the team in Solo's absence.
SPORTS
May 19, 2003 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Somewhere in a box in a garage in a city in Southern California, they lie in wait. Media guides. Dozens of them. In pristine condition. The guides, assembled with such care so many years ago, long outlasted the teams and players they described, and even the league itself. The names are no more than memories now. Faded hopes from days gone by. The Memphis Rogues. The Rochester Lancers. The California Surf. The Edmonton Drillers. The San Antonio Thunder. The Philadelphia Atoms.
SPORTS
June 24, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
The United States is giddy, grateful, gushing over soccer. The president of the U.S. Soccer Federation says, "I think this has got to be the greatest win in U.S. soccer history." The goalkeeper pitches a shutout and says, "This is big, big news…. People in America have to understand this is huge." Landon Donovan scores a goal and says, "It's like a dream." All of this after Wednesday's World Cup victory against Algeria? No, all of this eight years ago after a second-round World Cup victory against Mexico.
SPORTS
May 12, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
If Sir Alex Ferguson had stuck with his original plan, today we might be praising his pasta and Chinese noodles rather than his decision to start Robin van Persie over Wayne Rooney. Or if he had chosen to pursue his interest in U.S. history, particularly the Civil War and the JFK assassination, he might have become a master teacher of men rather than a master motivator of them. But then again, if Ferguson hadn't passed on those two options to become the most successful coach in British soccer history, we wouldn't be calling him sir. After all few chefs, and even fewer U.S. history buffs, get knighted by the queen.
SPORTS
October 15, 1997 | LON EUBANKS
It probably wasn't the biggest victory in men's soccer for Cal State Fullerton. But last year's 2-1 victory over top-ranked UCLA in the NCAA tournament's first round certainly ranks as a memorable one, even though the Titans were eliminated by Creighton the next week in a shootout. "I'm sure [UCLA] still remembers that game," Coach Al Mistri said. "And I'm sure their team is going to be out to prove it was a fluke."
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Landon Donovan is a complicated man who plays a simple game. And that can lead to unexpected consequences. When others celebrate, he broods. When others smile, he scowls. And when others began preparing for the World Cup last winter, he walked away from soccer, saying he needed a break after playing nonstop for nearly 12 years. It was an unprecedented move for a player in the prime of his career, one that Donovan, even 10 months later, still can't define. "I didn't have a specific explanation as to why I needed to get away.
SPORTS
May 12, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
If Sir Alex Ferguson had stuck with his original plan, today we might be praising his pasta and Chinese noodles rather than his decision to start Robin van Persie over Wayne Rooney. Or if he had chosen to pursue his interest in U.S. history, particularly the Civil War and the JFK assassination, he might have become a master teacher of men rather than a master motivator of them. But then again, if Ferguson hadn't passed on those two options to become the most successful coach in British soccer history, we wouldn't be calling him sir. After all few chefs, and even fewer U.S. history buffs, get knighted by the queen.
SPORTS
February 21, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Standout goalkeeper Hope Solo was left off the U.S. team for next month's Algarve Cup in Portugal to have a long-standing wrist injury treated. Solo, generally considered the best women's goalkeeper in the world, has been playing with ligament damage in her left wrist. But the injury worsened recently and with qualifying for the 2015 World Cup more than a year off, the national team's medical staff recommended Solo treat the injury now, perhaps through surgery. Nicole Barnhart, Ashlyn Harris and Jill Loyden were the three keepers named to the team in Solo's absence.
SPORTS
June 24, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
The United States is giddy, grateful, gushing over soccer. The president of the U.S. Soccer Federation says, "I think this has got to be the greatest win in U.S. soccer history." The goalkeeper pitches a shutout and says, "This is big, big news…. People in America have to understand this is huge." Landon Donovan scores a goal and says, "It's like a dream." All of this after Wednesday's World Cup victory against Algeria? No, all of this eight years ago after a second-round World Cup victory against Mexico.
SPORTS
July 23, 2009 | Grahame L. Jones
AT FC GOLD PRIDE Time: 7. On the air: None. Where: Buck Shaw Stadium, Santa Clara. Records: Sol 11-2-4; Gold Pride 3-9-3. Record vs. Gold Pride: 3-0. Update: Sol starting defender Allison Falk, who scored the first goal in Women's Professional Soccer history, is listed as questionable because of an ankle injury. Three other Sol players, goalkeeper Karina LeBlanc of Canada and defender Stephanie Cox and midfielder Shannon Boxx of the U.S.
SPORTS
June 9, 2009 | Staff And Wire Reports
Real Madrid has announced the signing of Brazilian star Kaka from AC Milan. Madrid gave no financial details, but reports on Monday said the Spanish club will pay Milan $92 million for the attacking midfielder, making it the richest transfer deal in soccer history. The largest previous transfer was set by Zinedine Zidane when he joined Madrid from Juventus for $65 million in 2001. Kaka, who passed a physical in the Brazilian city of Recife earlier Monday, has signed a six-year contract.
SPORTS
June 16, 2008 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Alvin Rouse will not be going to South Africa in 2010 to play in the World Cup. There was never really much possibility of that anyway, what with Rouse being the starting goalkeeper for one of international soccer's minnow nations: Barbados. But Rouse can at least say that he had his moment or two in the sun. They came at the Home Depot Center on Sunday, where the U.S. routed Barbados, 8-0, to start its own 18-game qualifying run to the next World Cup. The eight-goal victory set a record. No U.
SPORTS
May 14, 2004 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Manchester United was the defending champion, the team with the swagger and a roster of stars that sparkled and flashed like the diamond stud in Rio Ferdinand's ear. Man U finished third. Chelsea was the brash newcomer, the team with a billionaire owner, Russian oil tycoon Roman Abramovich, who spent $175 million last July on players he hoped would bring the club its first title in half a century. Chelsea finished second. And Arsenal? Well, Arsenal was the team that once had been labeled boring.
SPORTS
June 14, 1990 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty years ago, the United States was a soccer power. Difficult as that might be to believe in light of the U.S. team's World Cup debacle against Czechoslovakia last Sunday, it's true. You could look it up. Better yet, you could talk to Arnold Oliver and Jimmy Brown. They are the only surviving members of the American team that reached the semifinals of the first World Cup, in Uruguay in 1930. No U.S. soccer team has done better in world competition.
SPORTS
May 14, 2004 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Manchester United was the defending champion, the team with the swagger and a roster of stars that sparkled and flashed like the diamond stud in Rio Ferdinand's ear. Man U finished third. Chelsea was the brash newcomer, the team with a billionaire owner, Russian oil tycoon Roman Abramovich, who spent $175 million last July on players he hoped would bring the club its first title in half a century. Chelsea finished second. And Arsenal? Well, Arsenal was the team that once had been labeled boring.
SPORTS
May 19, 2003 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Somewhere in a box in a garage in a city in Southern California, they lie in wait. Media guides. Dozens of them. In pristine condition. The guides, assembled with such care so many years ago, long outlasted the teams and players they described, and even the league itself. The names are no more than memories now. Faded hopes from days gone by. The Memphis Rogues. The Rochester Lancers. The California Surf. The Edmonton Drillers. The San Antonio Thunder. The Philadelphia Atoms.
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