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SPORTS
June 23, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When last spotted on a soccer field, Tiffeny Milbrett was face down on the Giants Stadium turf, wearing Danish cleat marks on her knees and thighs and Danish bruises everywhere else. Suffice to say the U.S. striker, the team's top goal scorer this year, had a rough time in Saturday's 3-0 American victory, often appearing the target of fouls by Denmark. But that didn't bother her. It was nerves that did.
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SPORTS
June 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
The U.S. women's soccer team looks as dominant as ever through two games in the Gold Cup. Two days after routing Trinidad and Tobago, 11-0, in their tournament opener, the Americans overpowered Costa Rica, 8-0, Sunday at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium. Nikki Serlenga scored three goals and Susan Bush had a goal and four assists for the United States, which clinched a berth in the semifinals of the eight-team tournament.
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SPORTS
July 7, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The temperature was in the low 90s, making it the sort of morning when the best thing to do was to find some shade and kick back. Not Carla Overbeck. Not the captain of the U.S. Women's World Cup team that plays China on Saturday at the Rose Bowl with a world championship on the line. There she was Tuesday morning, in sunglasses, shorts and a tank top, leading a pack of teammates on a run around the college playing fields in Claremont. Just for the fun of it. Just to work up a sweat.
SPORTS
November 25, 1999 | CHRIS SHAFFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As dean of sophomores at Harvard-Westlake High, Ned Smith has to deal with his share of problems, but he should have no problems with his soccer team. Jill Oakes, Imani Dorsey and Sara Deckers will make sure of it. They are the heart of Wolverines' nearly impenetrable defense. Oakes, a sophomore All-City transfer from Birmingham and an under-15 national pool player, bolsters a defense that gave up only 17 goals last season.
SPORTS
February 11, 1993 | KIM Q. BERKSHIRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Laguna Beach girls' soccer team held its first preseason meeting months ago, prospective team members agreed to play for second-year Coach James Gapp under one condition. Unless they were allowed to go skiing during the annual February week of school vacation known as Ski Week, they would not join the team. Based on this verbal agreement, 14 members of the varsity team and some junior varsity team members left Saturday for the slopes.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | MATEA GOLD and GEORGE RAMOS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Painters frantically emblazoned American flags on the faces of 2,000 fans hours before the Rose Bowl gates opened Saturday. Vendors scored brisk sales of mini-flags. Even American flag capes were in style on this hot day in Pasadena. The 90,185 people who made history as the largest crowd to ever view a women's sporting event turned the stadium into a virtual sea of red, white and blue wearing flag-themed shorts, T-shirts, banners, hair and even sunbaked cheeks.
SPORTS
July 7, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
You spend 17 days on the road with the Women's World Cup, you begin to hear things. You are sitting in an airport terminal and you hear two American men, probably in their early 40s, talking soccer. They are knowledgeable fans, flying up to catch the next U.S. women's match. "I'd rather watch the U.S. women play than the men," one says to the other. You are walking outside Foxboro Stadium and you hear two teenage boys riffing on the same topic. "I'd like to see the U.S. women play the U.S.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | JOSHUA CONNALLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the Chinese, the women's World Cup final between the United States and China on Saturday has come to represent more than just a soccer matchup between two longtime rivals. Coming on the heels of the NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia in May, the face-off at the Rose Bowl has become a matter of national pride and patriotism, with Chinese fans eager for a decisive victory. "We will win--we have to win," said one woman here in the Chinese capital. "We can't let the U.S. beat us.
SPORTS
March 17, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All that was needed was a little laughter, or at least a smile, and Tiffeny Milbrett was happy to oblige. Her two goals--the first a long-range rocket, the second a piece of close-in opportunism--helped power the United States to an impressive 4-0 victory over Finland on Tuesday and restored the Americans' chance of winning the sixth Algarve Cup women's soccer tournament. "I think sometimes our team is a little too serious, to the point where we're a little hard on ourselves," Milbrett said.
SPORTS
March 14, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES
To reach one of the more bizarre sights in this port city, it is necessary to ignore the storks that peer down suspiciously from the bell towers of the Igreja do Carmo, the ancient Carmelite church that dominates the square in front of it. Instead, make your way through the church doors and past all the ornate gilt work and seek out an old man who, for 120 escudos (about 65 cents), will allow you into an exterior courtyard behind the church.
SPORTS
July 12, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today the world championship, tomorrow the Pyramids? If the victorious U.S. players thought they were going to be taking it easy in the wake of winning the Women's World Cup, they might want to revise their plans. Between now and the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, the world champions will be busier than ever. A victory tour of the U.S. is being finalized for next month and so are not one, but two world tours designed to spread the gospel of women's soccer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely taller than a pair of shinguards, 3-year-old Anaheim resident Kimberly Cycon was every inch the women's soccer fan Sunday. Antsy while awaiting a parade at Disneyland's Main Street honoring the U.S. women's national soccer team--fresh from a tense World Cup victory against China--Kimberly recited her new mantra, "Kick the ball, kick the ball," and mimed her passing technique to anyone who would watch. So her game face needed a little practice.
NEWS
July 11, 1999 | MATEA GOLD and GEORGE RAMOS and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Painters frantically emblazoned American flags on the faces of 2,000 fans hours before the Rose Bowl gates opened Saturday. Vendors scored brisk sales of mini-flags. Even American flag capes were in style on this hot day in Pasadena. The 90,185 people who made history as the largest crowd to ever view a women's sporting event turned the stadium into a virtual sea of red, white and blue wearing flag-themed shorts, T-shirts, banners, hair and even sunbaked cheeks.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | JOSHUA CONNALLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the Chinese, the women's World Cup final between the United States and China on Saturday has come to represent more than just a soccer matchup between two longtime rivals. Coming on the heels of the NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Yugoslavia in May, the face-off at the Rose Bowl has become a matter of national pride and patriotism, with Chinese fans eager for a decisive victory. "We will win--we have to win," said one woman here in the Chinese capital. "We can't let the U.S. beat us.
NEWS
July 9, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
Frenzy over U.S. women's soccer team surprises even the faithful--92,000 of whom are expected at World Cup final. They have always traveled by bus, only now that bus travels with a four-motorcycle escort, weaving its way slowly through a gantlet of screaming girls and boys and overheated teenagers. One by one the members of the U.S. women's soccer team disembark, ready for another practice session at Pomona College in preparation for Saturday's Women's World Cup final at the Rose Bowl.
SPORTS
July 7, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
You spend 17 days on the road with the Women's World Cup, you begin to hear things. You are sitting in an airport terminal and you hear two American men, probably in their early 40s, talking soccer. They are knowledgeable fans, flying up to catch the next U.S. women's match. "I'd rather watch the U.S. women play than the men," one says to the other. You are walking outside Foxboro Stadium and you hear two teenage boys riffing on the same topic. "I'd like to see the U.S. women play the U.S.
SPORTS
May 3, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're not making it easy for Tony DiCicco. Two weeks from today, the U.S. women's national team coach will name his 20-player roster for this summer's Women's World Cup. The trouble is, none of the fringe players are fading quietly into the night. On Sunday afternoon, in front of a sellout crowd of 14,652 at Dekalb Memorial Stadium, they once again made a strong claim for being picked as the U.S. shut out Japan, 7-0.
SPORTS
June 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
The U.S. women's soccer team looks as dominant as ever through two games in the Gold Cup. Two days after routing Trinidad and Tobago, 11-0, in their tournament opener, the Americans overpowered Costa Rica, 8-0, Sunday at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium. Nikki Serlenga scored three goals and Susan Bush had a goal and four assists for the United States, which clinched a berth in the semifinals of the eight-team tournament.
SPORTS
July 7, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The temperature was in the low 90s, making it the sort of morning when the best thing to do was to find some shade and kick back. Not Carla Overbeck. Not the captain of the U.S. Women's World Cup team that plays China on Saturday at the Rose Bowl with a world championship on the line. There she was Tuesday morning, in sunglasses, shorts and a tank top, leading a pack of teammates on a run around the college playing fields in Claremont. Just for the fun of it. Just to work up a sweat.
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