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Social And Public Arts Resource Center

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NEWS
December 26, 1991 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "unibrow" was the fashion news at the Social and Public Art Resource Center. In case your eyebrows didn't grow together naturally, the ticket-taker Friday night had an eyebrow pencil handy so you could draw in the silhouette of a vulture hovering above your nose. Mexican artist Frida Kahlo had eyebrows like that, as well as a faint but distinct mustache.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using photographs of a chef and a bellhop in combination with historical pictures from labor demonstrations, Judith Baca and Patrick Blasa are creating a collage featuring hotel and restaurant workers in Los Angeles. Altogether, Baca and Blasa will spend 2 1/2 months blending the images using computer programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using photographs of a chef and a bellhop in combination with historical pictures from labor demonstrations, Judith Baca and Patrick Blasa are creating a collage featuring hotel and restaurant workers in Los Angeles. Altogether, Baca and Blasa will spend 2 1/2 months blending the images using computer programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "unibrow" was the fashion news at the Social and Public Art Resource Center. In case your eyebrows didn't grow together naturally, the ticket-taker Friday night had an eyebrow pencil handy so you could draw in the silhouette of a vulture hovering above your nose. Mexican artist Frida Kahlo had eyebrows like that, as well as a faint but distinct mustache.
BOOKS
February 3, 1991 | Ethel Alexander
Strength, perseverance and resolve are frequently the byproducts of pain, despair and oppression. The murals exhibited through the Los Angeles cityscape and documented in "Signs From the Heart" express the full range. Paralleling the sentiments of el movimiento of the late 1960s, murals began to spring up with full and legitimate force in the Chicano community, acting as barometer, Greek chorus and a collective community voice in response to the shortcomings in American mainstream social-political-economic-educational policy, practices and delivery.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Nine local artists were named Wednesday to paint the first murals for a revitalized city-funded mural program called Neighborhood Pride: Great Walls Unlimited. Those chosen to create the grand-scale artworks throughout Los Angeles are: Richard Wyatt, Roberto Delgado, Roderick Sykes, Wayne Healy, Wallace Cronk, Guillermo Ceniceros, Frank Romero, Yreina Cervantez and Karen Kitchell. The Social and Public Arts Resource Center in Venice is administering the mural program.
NEWS
July 18, 1985
Three Westside arts organization are among 32 recipients of grants from the new National/State/County Partnership, administered by the county Music and Performing Arts Commission. The Social and Public Arts resource Center received $4,000 and the Lafayette Players West and Will Geer's Theatricum Botanicum each received $2,500. A deadline of Sept. 3 has been set for the next grants and information is available from the Partnership office, (213) 974-1317.
NEWS
August 18, 1988
The Social and Public Arts Resource Center received a $20,000 grant this week from the Arco Foundation for its programs to preserve and document mural paintings. The nonprofit arts organization based in Venice sponsors a mural training program for youths and was involved in the restoration of a major section of the so called "Great Wall of Los Angeles" in Van Nuys, which depicts the history of California from the perspective of the state's ethnic populations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997
The graffiti pit--accidentally whitewashed in January by the city--will soon be back in glorious color. Plans for a paint-in will be discussed Monday night at a Social and Public Arts Resource Center meeting at 6:30 p.m. at 685 Venice Blvd. "We're asking artists to provide sketches of their proposed work, and will be designating portions of the wall to them," said Sydney Kamlager, director of the city-funded agency. "This is about restoring graffiti art, not tagging.
BOOKS
February 3, 1991 | Ethel Alexander
Strength, perseverance and resolve are frequently the byproducts of pain, despair and oppression. The murals exhibited through the Los Angeles cityscape and documented in "Signs From the Heart" express the full range. Paralleling the sentiments of el movimiento of the late 1960s, murals began to spring up with full and legitimate force in the Chicano community, acting as barometer, Greek chorus and a collective community voice in response to the shortcomings in American mainstream social-political-economic-educational policy, practices and delivery.
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