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Social Anxiety

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HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I come from a long line of worriers and have been something of one myself as far back as I can remember. As a child, I worried about bad guys hiding under my bed; as a teenager, I got worked up about exams at school. These days, the world economy, finances and my children's safety (not in that order) are just a few of the things that keep me up at night. While I'm tossing and turning struggling to keep my fears in check, my husband drifts off into a sound sleep. Very few things trouble him enough to lose sleep over.
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SPORTS
February 15, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
PHOENIX - His face is shadowed under an oversized baseball cap. His gaze is often averted to the ceiling or floor. His handshake is distant, his voice is small, his sentences trail off into awkward silence. The first impression of Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke is that, despite having just signed a $147-million deal with a team in baseball's second-largest market, he simply wants to run away and hide. It is a daily act of courage that he does not. "I didn't think there was anything wrong with me," he said Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000
Re "Pills for What Ails You Socially," Opinion, July 23: While I agree generally with Scott Gottlieb's assertion that drug companies are inappropriately advertising medication as the solution to social ills and consequently medicalizing symptoms that are normal traits, I disagree with his use of social anxiety/social phobia as an example of this. Perhaps he is confusing "shyness" with "social anxiety"; social anxiety/phobia can be a severe and disabling anxiety disorder. Medication alone is not the answer.
SPORTS
November 18, 2012 | Lisa Dillman and Eric Pincus
White's struggles Off-court problems -- now they are called "issues" -- between players and teams used to be worked out behind closed doors and often at a logical pace. Then came social media, and more specifically, Twitter. The scary thing is that the safety net is gone. The filter has vanished and it is entirely possible that every thought from an executive, coach or player -- positive and negative -- can go viral within minutes. This is aptly illustrated by the Twitter account of the Houston Rockets' Royce White -- his handle is @Highway_30 -- and his current dispute with the team over the handling of his anxiety disorder.
HEALTH
April 9, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Scientists call it the love hormone, the chemical that binds people to one another. Now researchers from the University of Zurich in Switzerland have found that the hormone, released in high amounts in mothers after childbirth, can improve a person's ability to interpret what is going on in another person -- by reading information gleaned from their eyes.
SPORTS
November 18, 2012 | Lisa Dillman and Eric Pincus
White's struggles Off-court problems -- now they are called "issues" -- between players and teams used to be worked out behind closed doors and often at a logical pace. Then came social media, and more specifically, Twitter. The scary thing is that the safety net is gone. The filter has vanished and it is entirely possible that every thought from an executive, coach or player -- positive and negative -- can go viral within minutes. This is aptly illustrated by the Twitter account of the Houston Rockets' Royce White -- his handle is @Highway_30 -- and his current dispute with the team over the handling of his anxiety disorder.
OPINION
July 23, 2000 | Scott Gottlieb, Scott Gottlieb is a resident in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital and a staff writer for the British Medical Journal
Shyness, once viewed as becoming in some people, is today being cast as a prevalent medical problem. Thankfully, shy people can receive relief in the form of a pill called Paxil. The medicine is an old drug being applied to a novel disease called "social anxiety disorder." Both the disease and the drug are largely the innovation of the drug's manufacturer and its Madison Avenue advertising agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
"Pills for What Ails You Socially" (Opinion, July 23) is wrong to assert that "social anxiety disorder" and the antidepressant medicine used to treat it are "largely the innovation" of the drug's manufacturer and its ad agency. Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American Psychiatric Assn.'s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders since 1980. Paxil, an antidepressant, was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression in 1993 and was not approved for treatment of social anxiety disorder until 1999.
SPORTS
July 24, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a running back for the New Orleans Saints, Ricky Williams would repeatedly hurl his body into a wall of 300-pound defensive linemen, yet he was too unnerved to take off his helmet during interviews. He would allow his mail to accumulate for days, fearful his neighbors were watching his every move. Even trips to the grocery store turned into harrowing ordeals. "I would hide from people in the store," he said.
SPORTS
February 15, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
PHOENIX - His face is shadowed under an oversized baseball cap. His gaze is often averted to the ceiling or floor. His handshake is distant, his voice is small, his sentences trail off into awkward silence. The first impression of Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke is that, despite having just signed a $147-million deal with a team in baseball's second-largest market, he simply wants to run away and hide. It is a daily act of courage that he does not. "I didn't think there was anything wrong with me," he said Friday.
HEALTH
December 5, 2011 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I come from a long line of worriers and have been something of one myself as far back as I can remember. As a child, I worried about bad guys hiding under my bed; as a teenager, I got worked up about exams at school. These days, the world economy, finances and my children's safety (not in that order) are just a few of the things that keep me up at night. While I'm tossing and turning struggling to keep my fears in check, my husband drifts off into a sound sleep. Very few things trouble him enough to lose sleep over.
HEALTH
April 9, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Scientists call it the love hormone, the chemical that binds people to one another. Now researchers from the University of Zurich in Switzerland have found that the hormone, released in high amounts in mothers after childbirth, can improve a person's ability to interpret what is going on in another person -- by reading information gleaned from their eyes.
SPORTS
July 24, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a running back for the New Orleans Saints, Ricky Williams would repeatedly hurl his body into a wall of 300-pound defensive linemen, yet he was too unnerved to take off his helmet during interviews. He would allow his mail to accumulate for days, fearful his neighbors were watching his every move. Even trips to the grocery store turned into harrowing ordeals. "I would hide from people in the store," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
"Pills for What Ails You Socially" (Opinion, July 23) is wrong to assert that "social anxiety disorder" and the antidepressant medicine used to treat it are "largely the innovation" of the drug's manufacturer and its ad agency. Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American Psychiatric Assn.'s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders since 1980. Paxil, an antidepressant, was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression in 1993 and was not approved for treatment of social anxiety disorder until 1999.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000
Re "Pills for What Ails You Socially," Opinion, July 23: While I agree generally with Scott Gottlieb's assertion that drug companies are inappropriately advertising medication as the solution to social ills and consequently medicalizing symptoms that are normal traits, I disagree with his use of social anxiety/social phobia as an example of this. Perhaps he is confusing "shyness" with "social anxiety"; social anxiety/phobia can be a severe and disabling anxiety disorder. Medication alone is not the answer.
OPINION
July 23, 2000 | Scott Gottlieb, Scott Gottlieb is a resident in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital and a staff writer for the British Medical Journal
Shyness, once viewed as becoming in some people, is today being cast as a prevalent medical problem. Thankfully, shy people can receive relief in the form of a pill called Paxil. The medicine is an old drug being applied to a novel disease called "social anxiety disorder." Both the disease and the drug are largely the innovation of the drug's manufacturer and its Madison Avenue advertising agency.
HEALTH
February 21, 2005 | Peter Jaret, Special to The Times
Years ago, when parents came to him worried because their kids seemed abnormally shy, Murray Stein, a psychiatrist at UC San Diego, would tell them not to worry -- that most children outgrow periods of intense shyness. "Now we're not so quick to dismiss their concern," he says. Although most very shy kids do emerge from their shells, as many as one in three become more and more troubled, according to Stein, one of the country's leading experts in childhood anxiety disorders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Alan Zarembo
It costs about $2,000 to buy an ounce of the illegal drug, the therapist said - enough for roughly 150 doses. She pays her longtime dealer in cash; he gives her a Ziploc bag of white powder. Back home, she scoops the contents into clear capsules. She calls it "the medicine"; others know it as MDMA, the active ingredient in the party drug Ecstasy. MDMA has been banned by the federal government since 1985 as a dangerous recreational drug with no medical value. But interest is rising in its potential to help people suffering from psychiatric or emotional problems.
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