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Social Anxiety Disorder

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
"Pills for What Ails You Socially" (Opinion, July 23) is wrong to assert that "social anxiety disorder" and the antidepressant medicine used to treat it are "largely the innovation" of the drug's manufacturer and its ad agency. Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American Psychiatric Assn.'s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders since 1980. Paxil, an antidepressant, was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression in 1993 and was not approved for treatment of social anxiety disorder until 1999.
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SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
Tom Garfinkel, president and chief executive of the San Diego Padres, has been welcomed to the world of texts, tweets, Facebook and smartphone recordings. And Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke has an apology to show for it. In a meeting with season-ticket holders at Petco Park the day after the Greinke-Carlos Quentin brawl in San Diego, Garfinkel accused the Dodgers right-hander of hitting Quentin intentionally, blamed Greinke's broken collarbone on his decision to lower his shoulder protecting himself, and appeared to mock Greinke's social anxiety disorder by implying he has autism.
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SPORTS
July 24, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a running back for the New Orleans Saints, Ricky Williams would repeatedly hurl his body into a wall of 300-pound defensive linemen, yet he was too unnerved to take off his helmet during interviews. He would allow his mail to accumulate for days, fearful his neighbors were watching his every move. Even trips to the grocery store turned into harrowing ordeals. "I would hide from people in the store," he said.
SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
It's a new world out there, which Mitt Romney and the 47% could tell you, but some are a little slow to embrace, or at least recognize. This world texts, tweets, Facebooks and records on smartphones. You shouldn't have to be smart to realize this, just breathing in a modern country. If you mess up and are anything close to a public figure, chances are decent you could be trending in a moment. Padres President and Chief Executive Tom Garfinkel was caught supposedly being emotional, and most certainly utterly stupid, and you have to wonder how this all plays out. In a meeting with season ticket holders at Petco Park the day after the Zack Greinke-Carlos Quentin brawl in San Diego, Garfinkel not only accused Greinke of hitting Quentin intentionally, blamed Greinke for breaking his own collarbone by using his shoulder to protect himself and essentially accused Greinke of lying, but mocked Greinke's social-anxiety disorder by implying he was autistic.
SPORTS
February 15, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
PHOENIX - His face is shadowed under an oversized baseball cap. His gaze is often averted to the ceiling or floor. His handshake is distant, his voice is small, his sentences trail off into awkward silence. The first impression of Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke is that, despite having just signed a $147-million deal with a team in baseball's second-largest market, he simply wants to run away and hide. It is a daily act of courage that he does not. "I didn't think there was anything wrong with me," he said Friday.
SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
It's a new world out there, which Mitt Romney and the 47% could tell you, but some are a little slow to embrace, or at least recognize. This world texts, tweets, Facebooks and records on smartphones. You shouldn't have to be smart to realize this, just breathing in a modern country. If you mess up and are anything close to a public figure, chances are decent you could be trending in a moment. Padres President and Chief Executive Tom Garfinkel was caught supposedly being emotional, and most certainly utterly stupid, and you have to wonder how this all plays out. In a meeting with season ticket holders at Petco Park the day after the Zack Greinke-Carlos Quentin brawl in San Diego, Garfinkel not only accused Greinke of hitting Quentin intentionally, blamed Greinke for breaking his own collarbone by using his shoulder to protect himself and essentially accused Greinke of lying, but mocked Greinke's social-anxiety disorder by implying he was autistic.
HEALTH
March 1, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
They don't write checks in public because they fear people watching them write. They don't go shopping. They have problems with authority figures, so they are typically underemployed or unemployed. They don't visit doctors for the same reason, so they are rarely identified and treated. The mysterious illness that afflicts them is a syndrome called social anxiety disorder.
SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
Tom Garfinkel, president and chief executive of the San Diego Padres, has been welcomed to the world of texts, tweets, Facebook and smartphone recordings. And Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke has an apology to show for it. In a meeting with season-ticket holders at Petco Park the day after the Greinke-Carlos Quentin brawl in San Diego, Garfinkel accused the Dodgers right-hander of hitting Quentin intentionally, blamed Greinke's broken collarbone on his decision to lower his shoulder protecting himself, and appeared to mock Greinke's social anxiety disorder by implying he has autism.
HEALTH
November 5, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
In the early 1980s, a profound shift in psychiatry set the stage for the growth of psychiatric diagnoses in kids. In a third revision of the manual often called the profession's bible (the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM), the American Psychiatric Assn. began adding descriptions of newly recognized anxiety disorders. The new entries set forth symptoms of extreme shyness, worry or fear.
SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The Angels bolstered their sagging rotation with a right-hander who has been one of baseball's top starting pitchers over the last 4 1/2 years, acquiring Zack Greinke from the Milwaukee Brewers for shortstop Jean Segura and double-A pitchers Johnny Hellweg and Ariel Pena on Friday. The deal was remarkable for the Angels in that they did not have to give up two of their top young major leaguers, center fielder Peter Bourjos and pitcher Garrett Richards. Segura, recently called up from double-A Arkansas, was preparing to join the Angels for stretch when he was pulled off the field by first-base coach Alfredo Griffen and sent to Manager Mike Scioscia's office to be informed of the deal.
SPORTS
February 15, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
PHOENIX - His face is shadowed under an oversized baseball cap. His gaze is often averted to the ceiling or floor. His handshake is distant, his voice is small, his sentences trail off into awkward silence. The first impression of Dodgers pitcher Zack Greinke is that, despite having just signed a $147-million deal with a team in baseball's second-largest market, he simply wants to run away and hide. It is a daily act of courage that he does not. "I didn't think there was anything wrong with me," he said Friday.
SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The Angels bolstered their sagging rotation with a right-hander who has been one of baseball's top starting pitchers over the last 4 1/2 years, acquiring Zack Greinke from the Milwaukee Brewers for shortstop Jean Segura and double-A pitchers Johnny Hellweg and Ariel Pena on Friday. The deal was remarkable for the Angels in that they did not have to give up two of their top young major leaguers, center fielder Peter Bourjos and pitcher Garrett Richards. Segura, recently called up from double-A Arkansas, was preparing to join the Angels for stretch when he was pulled off the field by first-base coach Alfredo Griffen and sent to Manager Mike Scioscia's office to be informed of the deal.
HEALTH
November 5, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
In the early 1980s, a profound shift in psychiatry set the stage for the growth of psychiatric diagnoses in kids. In a third revision of the manual often called the profession's bible (the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM), the American Psychiatric Assn. began adding descriptions of newly recognized anxiety disorders. The new entries set forth symptoms of extreme shyness, worry or fear.
HEALTH
November 25, 2002 | Linda Marsa, Times Staff Writer
The ads seem to be everywhere, on TV, in magazines, doctors' offices, the Internet: Are you feeling tense? Having difficulty sleeping? Scared of criticism? If so, they suggest, the answer could be a pill -- an antidepressant, to be exact. The drugs that revolutionized the treatment of depression a decade ago now are increasingly used to treat anxiety disorders, mental illnesses that can cause paralyzing worry or intense fear of social situations.
SPORTS
July 24, 2002 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a running back for the New Orleans Saints, Ricky Williams would repeatedly hurl his body into a wall of 300-pound defensive linemen, yet he was too unnerved to take off his helmet during interviews. He would allow his mail to accumulate for days, fearful his neighbors were watching his every move. Even trips to the grocery store turned into harrowing ordeals. "I would hide from people in the store," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000
"Pills for What Ails You Socially" (Opinion, July 23) is wrong to assert that "social anxiety disorder" and the antidepressant medicine used to treat it are "largely the innovation" of the drug's manufacturer and its ad agency. Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American Psychiatric Assn.'s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders since 1980. Paxil, an antidepressant, was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of depression in 1993 and was not approved for treatment of social anxiety disorder until 1999.
HEALTH
November 25, 2002 | Linda Marsa, Times Staff Writer
The ads seem to be everywhere, on TV, in magazines, doctors' offices, the Internet: Are you feeling tense? Having difficulty sleeping? Scared of criticism? If so, they suggest, the answer could be a pill -- an antidepressant, to be exact. The drugs that revolutionized the treatment of depression a decade ago now are increasingly used to treat anxiety disorders, mental illnesses that can cause paralyzing worry or intense fear of social situations.
SPORTS
June 19, 2009 | Associated Press
The Philadelphia Phillies put left fielder Raul Ibanez on the 15-day disabled list Thursday because of a strained left groin. "It's been bothering him, I guess, a little bit off and on since the beginning of April," General Manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said. Ibanez is batting .312 with 22 homers and 59 RBIs, ranking second in the NL in homers and RBIs.
HEALTH
March 1, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
They don't write checks in public because they fear people watching them write. They don't go shopping. They have problems with authority figures, so they are typically underemployed or unemployed. They don't visit doctors for the same reason, so they are rarely identified and treated. The mysterious illness that afflicts them is a syndrome called social anxiety disorder.
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