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Social Anxiety

MAGAZINE
April 24, 2005
I would like to acknowledge Willie Danz for causing me a bit of social anxiety ("The Ocularist," by Tracie White, April 10). One of my patients has a Danz-made prosthetic eye. When she arrives for an appointment I remember that she has a prosthetic and think to myself that I should make eye contact with her real eye. But, alas, at casual viewing I cannot tell which eye is the real one. I end up feeling awkward as my view darts from eye to eye or...
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HEALTH
June 7, 1999 | SHARI ROAN
The contraceptive sponge making a comeback: The Today contraceptive sponge, a product that drew a small but fiercely loyal group of female users earlier this decade, will soon be available again in the United States. The sponge will be reintroduced by Allendale Pharmaceuticals Inc., which bought the rights to the product from the manufacturer that had withdrawn it due to production problems. At one time, the sponge was the most popular nonprescription contraceptive in the country.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
She's a 26-year-old former party girl with social anxiety issues, a motorcycle-riding iconoclast who dropped out of USC and attends meetings in Led Zeppelin T-shirts. Megan Ellison is also the most powerful new producer in Hollywood, running a burgeoning movie company from her $33-million compound in the hills above the Sunset Strip - and giving a critical boost to the kinds of adult dramas the major studios have all but abandoned. Hollywood has long attracted wealthy, star-struck investors who don't appreciate the difficulty (or "complexity")
HEALTH
June 23, 2003 | Elena Conis, Times Staff Writer
A small part of the brain is providing new clues to social anxiety disorders. Researchers at the Harvard Medical School studying images of brain activity found that adults who were timid as children display very different brain signal patterns from those who were bold and outgoing when younger. The findings come from a 2-decade-old research project that has followed a group of more than 100 people from age 2 to adulthood, monitoring their behavior and psychiatric changes over time.
SPORTS
June 19, 2009 | Associated Press
The Philadelphia Phillies put left fielder Raul Ibanez on the 15-day disabled list Thursday because of a strained left groin. "It's been bothering him, I guess, a little bit off and on since the beginning of April," General Manager Ruben Amaro Jr. said. Ibanez is batting .312 with 22 homers and 59 RBIs, ranking second in the NL in homers and RBIs.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Denise Florez
Young adult authors at the Festival of Books on Saturday dove straight into their experiences in writing about young characters who deal with social, physical and mental limits, and how they find their own identities while writing about privilege, mutant grasshoppers, college or cryogenic experimentation.  Moderator Aaron Hartzler on a panel titled "Young Adult Fiction: Testing the Limits" started by asking panelists E. Lockhart, Rainbow Rowell,...
HEALTH
March 1, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
They don't write checks in public because they fear people watching them write. They don't go shopping. They have problems with authority figures, so they are typically underemployed or unemployed. They don't visit doctors for the same reason, so they are rarely identified and treated. The mysterious illness that afflicts them is a syndrome called social anxiety disorder.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
When one of us takes in another's face, it's like a party in the brain. Signals dart from region to region as we piece together the eyes, the mouth, the emotional expression, the degree of attraction or fear we may feel, the memory of a familiar feature or mannerism. New research has found that, by listening in long enough to an individual's brain as he or she gazes at many faces, one can sketch a pretty good facsimile of an unfamiliar new face that person is seeing. Using the same technique, one might one day be able to reconstruct a facial image called to someone's mind by memory, or even seen in a dream.
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