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NEWS
March 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
A couple of years ago, Yale University researchers came out with a study advocating a "fat tax." Much of the country laughed. The measure, designed to lower billowing obesity rates in the United States, would have placed taxes on foods loaded with fat and cholesterol, and subsidized the cost of fruits and vegetables. Interviewed in 1998, Yale professor Kelly D.
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NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Morgan Little
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), facing accusations that he plagiarized Wikipedia entries in two speeches, claims critics are “making a mountain out of a molehill,” and that he credited the proper sources. While campaigning for Ken Cuccinelli, the Republican gubernatorial candidate in Virginia, earlier this week, Paul warned Liberty University students about the dangers of genetic testing. “In your lifetime, much of your potential, or lack thereof, can be known simply by swabbing the inside of your cheek.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1997 | RICHARD RODRIGUEZ, Richard Rodriguez is the author of "Days of Obligation: An Argument With My Mexican Father" (Viking) and a regular contributor to The Times and "The News Hour With Jim Lehrer."
Some weeks ago, a law professor at the University of Texas got in trouble for saying that African Americans and Mexicans are at a disadvantage in higher education because they come from cultures that tolerate failure. Jesse Jackson flew to Austin to deliver a fiery speech; students demanded the professor's ouster. It was all typical of the way we have debated affirmative action for years.
OPINION
October 17, 2013
Re Editorial cartoon by David Horsey, Opinion, Oct. 15 David Horsey's implication that Ayn Rand's philosophy and work were oppressive to the poor continues the glib and reflexive tradition of disparaging Rand while remaining ignorant of her ideas. In fact, Rand's life and work were dedicated to eradicating poverty of every kind. She fought for freedom, opportunity and the creation of wealth that was not hindered by race, social class, religion, gender or government manipulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991
The Department of Social Science would like to make the public record quite clear: Buchholz's position on multiculturalism represents his own personal views and in no way reflects the views, attitudes or sentiments of this department or of other faculty members within this department. In fact, at its March 2 retreat devoted to a discussion of curriculum diversity, the department adopted the following motion: "The department supports efforts to develop a more inclusive curriculum reflecting increasing recent scholarship in the categories of, among others, race, ethnicity, gender and social class."
OPINION
May 3, 2008
Re "In debt, out of work and living with Mom," April 27 The Times writes of the middle class of my generation. But below that social class is where I and many more Generation Xers are and have remained since we've entered adulthood. Financial times have always been tough for me and millions like me. I have always watched my spending and have never owned a home. Now that middle-class America is experiencing financial woes on a massive scale, the media find it appropriate to write about it. But millions in Generation X and Y are struggling and continue to do so without parental help.
OPINION
October 17, 2013
Re Editorial cartoon by David Horsey, Opinion, Oct. 15 David Horsey's implication that Ayn Rand's philosophy and work were oppressive to the poor continues the glib and reflexive tradition of disparaging Rand while remaining ignorant of her ideas. In fact, Rand's life and work were dedicated to eradicating poverty of every kind. She fought for freedom, opportunity and the creation of wealth that was not hindered by race, social class, religion, gender or government manipulation.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Morgan Little
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), facing accusations that he plagiarized Wikipedia entries in two speeches, claims critics are “making a mountain out of a molehill,” and that he credited the proper sources. While campaigning for Ken Cuccinelli, the Republican gubernatorial candidate in Virginia, earlier this week, Paul warned Liberty University students about the dangers of genetic testing. “In your lifetime, much of your potential, or lack thereof, can be known simply by swabbing the inside of your cheek.
OPINION
December 6, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
As an Anglophile, I'm as pathetic as the next chap. My idea of a good time is to be in London, drinking at lunch with some well-lubricated British journalist friends, stumbling out when it's getting dark, tea at a fancy hotel and then theater in the evening. Then repeat. And yes, when I'm not in London (that is, almost all the time), I rarely miss an episode of "Downton Abbey. " But at least I have the decency to be ashamed about it. The shameless popularity of this blue-blood soap opera, which starts its third season in the U.S. next month, is astonishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
A good sitcom is funny; a great one earns your respect and attention even when it's not funny. For years, ABC's "Roseanne" cut it in both categories. At the very least, it tops all of TV's distinctively blue-collar comedies. Even that NBC antique, "The Life of Riley," where William Bendix's lunch pail became an extension of his arm in the 1950s? Get real. Even Fox's outgoing "Married . . . With Children"? Are you kidding? The Bundys wouldn't know a plant whistle from a screaming teapot.
OPINION
December 6, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
As an Anglophile, I'm as pathetic as the next chap. My idea of a good time is to be in London, drinking at lunch with some well-lubricated British journalist friends, stumbling out when it's getting dark, tea at a fancy hotel and then theater in the evening. Then repeat. And yes, when I'm not in London (that is, almost all the time), I rarely miss an episode of "Downton Abbey. " But at least I have the decency to be ashamed about it. The shameless popularity of this blue-blood soap opera, which starts its third season in the U.S. next month, is astonishing.
OPINION
April 13, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
Everyone says there's a class war going on in the United States. If so, it is, at least so far, a war of words. It's also a war in which a principal tactic is accusing the other side of fighting a class war while denying that you're fighting one yourself. Meanwhile, everybody claims to be on the same side: the side of the people, against the aristocratic elitist snobs who … where did I park my tumbrel? In this war of words, certain words take on a special weight or meaning.
OPINION
May 3, 2008
Re "In debt, out of work and living with Mom," April 27 The Times writes of the middle class of my generation. But below that social class is where I and many more Generation Xers are and have remained since we've entered adulthood. Financial times have always been tough for me and millions like me. I have always watched my spending and have never owned a home. Now that middle-class America is experiencing financial woes on a massive scale, the media find it appropriate to write about it. But millions in Generation X and Y are struggling and continue to do so without parental help.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Rigid class structures and the fantasies they inspire make for potent melodrama and equally exciting movement theater. From August Strindberg's "Miss Julie" to Jean Genet's "The Maids," intense parables of forbidden love and social revolt have not only become stage classics but also staples of the international ballet repertory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Social class has had more effect on whether a student will attend the University of California system than any other factor, including race, according to a new study of California high schools by UC Berkeley sociologists. One of five students admitted to the UC system in 1999 came from 100 elite private and public schools, the study of California high schools found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | SABRINA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the glass door of Starbucks on Kanan Road a sign reads, "I'm sorry, we're out of soy milk until later today." Next door, on the glass window of Yum Yum Donuts, another sign reads, "Medium coffee and muffin $1.49 plus tax." A thin strip of grass--and one invisible barrier--separates the two establishments. Walk into Starbucks and you meet a line of upper-middle-class professionals waiting for coffee and pastries. A plum-painted ceiling is complemented by the designer tile and carpeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | SABRINA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the glass door of Starbucks on Kanan Road a sign reads, "I'm sorry, we're out of soy milk until later today." Next door, on the glass window of Yum Yum Donuts, another sign reads, "Medium coffee and muffin $1.49 plus tax." A thin strip of grass--and one invisible barrier--separates the two establishments. Walk into Starbucks and you meet a line of upper-middle-class professionals waiting for coffee and pastries. A plum-painted ceiling is complemented by the designer tile and carpeting.
NEWS
July 23, 1985 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Prince Edward, Queen Elizabeth's youngest son, and a trio of royal cousins celebrated their 21st birthdays last month at a lavish bash at Windsor Castle. The party, hosted by the queen, reportedly drew 600 aristocratic guests and cost close to $100,000.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
A couple of years ago, Yale University researchers came out with a study advocating a "fat tax." Much of the country laughed. The measure, designed to lower billowing obesity rates in the United States, would have placed taxes on foods loaded with fat and cholesterol, and subsidized the cost of fruits and vegetables. Interviewed in 1998, Yale professor Kelly D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1997 | RICHARD RODRIGUEZ, Richard Rodriguez is the author of "Days of Obligation: An Argument With My Mexican Father" (Viking) and a regular contributor to The Times and "The News Hour With Jim Lehrer."
Some weeks ago, a law professor at the University of Texas got in trouble for saying that African Americans and Mexicans are at a disadvantage in higher education because they come from cultures that tolerate failure. Jesse Jackson flew to Austin to deliver a fiery speech; students demanded the professor's ouster. It was all typical of the way we have debated affirmative action for years.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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