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Social Democratic Party Czech Republic

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NEWS
June 21, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Social Democrats placed first Saturday in Czech parliamentary elections but appeared poorly positioned to form the next government, leaving conservative parties celebrating the results. "One cannot say the left has won, and this is a reason for enormous joy for me and for many other people," declared former Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus, the dominant figure of the Czech right. "The turn to the left didn't materialize. . . . This is a good reason to open champagne at home this evening."
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NEWS
November 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In a blow to the governing Social Democrats, a center-right coalition won a surprise victory in Czech Senate elections, and another opposition party finished second. Candidates for the four-party coalition led by the Christian Democrats and the Freedom Union won in 13 of 27 districts in the two days of runoff voting. They were followed by the conservative Civic Democratic Party of former Premier Vaclav Klaus, which won nine seats.
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NEWS
June 20, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Petr Bradac is one of the lucky few still working at Poldi Steel, a once-proud purveyor of specialty steels that gave the Soviet military some of its sharpest teeth. But Poldi is in deep trouble. Bradac is worried. And in parliamentary voting Friday and today, the unhappy steelworker may help put a left-of-center government into power for the first time since the 1989 "Velvet Revolution" overturned Communist rule. "Nothing is certain anymore," complained the brawny Bradac, 30.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Social Democrats placed first Saturday in Czech parliamentary elections but appeared poorly positioned to form the next government, leaving conservative parties celebrating the results. "One cannot say the left has won, and this is a reason for enormous joy for me and for many other people," declared former Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus, the dominant figure of the Czech right. "The turn to the left didn't materialize. . . . This is a good reason to open champagne at home this evening."
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
In a blow to the governing Social Democrats, a center-right coalition won a surprise victory in Czech Senate elections, and another opposition party finished second. Candidates for the four-party coalition led by the Christian Democrats and the Freedom Union won in 13 of 27 districts in the two days of runoff voting. They were followed by the conservative Civic Democratic Party of former Premier Vaclav Klaus, which won nine seats.
NEWS
June 20, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Petr Bradac is one of the lucky few still working at Poldi Steel, a once-proud purveyor of specialty steels that gave the Soviet military some of its sharpest teeth. But Poldi is in deep trouble. Bradac is worried. And in parliamentary voting Friday and today, the unhappy steelworker may help put a left-of-center government into power for the first time since the 1989 "Velvet Revolution" overturned Communist rule. "Nothing is certain anymore," complained the brawny Bradac, 30.
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