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Social Democratic Party Germany

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NEWS
September 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germany's new direction after 16 years in the conservative hands of Helmut Kohl became glaringly apparent Monday when Chancellor-elect Gerhard Schroeder invited the environmentalist Greens to begin negotiations on a coalition government. Change is what Germans voted for when they ousted Kohl in a federal election Sunday, and winners and losers both made clear the day after that the shifts may be more seismic than many voters intended.
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NEWS
February 28, 2000 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this boggy flatland between the North and Baltic seas, considered the back of beyond by most Germans, voters Sunday rose to the unusual occasion of being political bellwethers to reelect Social Democrats to the state leadership and punish the scandal-plagued Christian Democratic Union. State election results for tiny Schleswig-Holstein were neither the landslide for incumbent Social Democratic Gov.
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NEWS
October 13, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can things possibly get worse for Germany's Social Democrats? At times this summer and fall, the country's oldest political party has been so troubled, so rudderless, that the governing Christian Democrats have enjoyed a virtual free ride in the Parliament and chancellery, with no unified opposition at all. Social Democratic Party leader Rudolf Scharping, 47, is proving unable to bring his noisy, intraparty opponents into line.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMSBD TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the unlikely role of caped crusader, the embattled spirit of former Chancellor Helmut Kohl has swept into this week's Social Democratic Party convention to rescue his beleaguered successor and political rival, Gerhard Schroeder.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's winning coalition government was on the defensive Monday as political commentators pondered how long it could survive with weak allies and a toughened opposition. ARD public television drew a black eye on a picture of the smiling Kohl, whose stubborn optimism put him first across the finish line in Sunday's federal election to claim a skimpy majority of 48.4% of the popular vote to 48.1% for the combined opposition. That was a big loss from 54.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not be the stuff that drives elections here, but it certainly reflected an unusual meanness of spirit in German politics last week when word got out that one of the nation's most respected public figures, former President Richard von Weizsaecker, had been given the bum's rush by his own party.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The main opposition Social Democrats concluded a two-day special party conference Tuesday by voting to back a constitutional change to allow German military forces to participate in "Blue Helmet" U.N. peacekeeping forces. Although the party's new position falls far short of Chancellor Helmut Kohl's call for provisions that would permit broader deployment of German forces, for example in operations such as last year's Gulf War, the move was considered significant.
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | From Reuters
Leaders of Germany's main opposition party Monday named moderate Rudolf Scharping as the sole candidate to take the helm of the Social Democrats after he won an unprecedented vote by the rank and file. Scharping, the 45-year-old premier of Rhineland-Palatinate state, told television that the party chairman had a right to run as the challenger to Chancellor Helmut Kohl in elections next year. "I won't let anyone take that right away from me," he said.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With flags flying and loudspeaker blaring, the bright little car trundled optimistically into this eastern German farming community--a one-vehicle caravan dispatched to spread the socialist message among those preparing to vote in Sunday's national elections. There was only one problem: the streets were empty.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long, heated debate, the opposition Social Democratic Party on Friday endorsed the deployment of German military forces outside the North Atlantic Treaty Organization area--but under tight limitations that would restrict such deployment to participation in U.N.-approved peacekeeping duties.
NEWS
October 11, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's Social Democrats on Sunday suffered their sixth straight setback in state elections since taking power a year ago, but they proclaimed themselves relieved that the Berlin vote was not as humiliating as earlier referendums on the government's modest reforms.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
German voters handed Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's governing Social Democrats a humiliating defeat in elections in the eastern state of Saxony, battering the party for the fifth time this month. While the Christian Democrats maintained their grip on power in the legislature, TV forecasts showed Schroeder's party falling into third place behind the ex-communist Party of Democratic Socialism, which received 22% of the vote.
NEWS
September 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Germany's new direction after 16 years in the conservative hands of Helmut Kohl became glaringly apparent Monday when Chancellor-elect Gerhard Schroeder invited the environmentalist Greens to begin negotiations on a coalition government. Change is what Germans voted for when they ousted Kohl in a federal election Sunday, and winners and losers both made clear the day after that the shifts may be more seismic than many voters intended.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerhard Schroeder, the suave and media-savvy governor of Lower Saxony, ousted German Chancellor Helmut Kohl in a splintered federal election Sunday, sending Europe's longest-serving leader into retirement and ending an era that witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall and German reunification.
NEWS
September 22, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not be the stuff that drives elections here, but it certainly reflected an unusual meanness of spirit in German politics last week when word got out that one of the nation's most respected public figures, former President Richard von Weizsaecker, had been given the bum's rush by his own party.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can things possibly get worse for Germany's Social Democrats? At times this summer and fall, the country's oldest political party has been so troubled, so rudderless, that the governing Christian Democrats have enjoyed a virtual free ride in the Parliament and chancellery, with no unified opposition at all. Social Democratic Party leader Rudolf Scharping, 47, is proving unable to bring his noisy, intraparty opponents into line.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After losing three straight general elections over the last decade, Germany's opposition Social Democrats have turned to new, largely untested faces to lead them to power by the mid-1990s. The surprise election this week of 54-year-old Hans-Ulrich Klose, the party treasurer and former Hamburg mayor, to the pivotal job of party parliamentary leader completed a cleaning out of the old guard and an attempt to bring new blood into the party hierarchy.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
German voters handed Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's governing Social Democrats a humiliating defeat in elections in the eastern state of Saxony, battering the party for the fifth time this month. While the Christian Democrats maintained their grip on power in the legislature, TV forecasts showed Schroeder's party falling into third place behind the ex-communist Party of Democratic Socialism, which received 22% of the vote.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's winning coalition government was on the defensive Monday as political commentators pondered how long it could survive with weak allies and a toughened opposition. ARD public television drew a black eye on a picture of the smiling Kohl, whose stubborn optimism put him first across the finish line in Sunday's federal election to claim a skimpy majority of 48.4% of the popular vote to 48.1% for the combined opposition. That was a big loss from 54.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An upbeat Chancellor Helmut Kohl claimed victory for his conservative coalition government in Sunday's federal election, but results show that he will rule Europe's richest and most powerful nation with only the slimmest majority in Parliament. German voters barely returned the 64-year-old Kohl to office for a fourth term, one that could make him Germany's longest-reigning leader since World War II.
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