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Social Democratic Party Japan

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NEWS
July 15, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this capital city of Tokyo's neighboring prefecture (state), a campaign debacle that could help Japan's beleaguered ruling Liberal Democrats was played out for all to see Wednesday. Four days before a crucial election for the lower house of Parliament, Hirotaka Akamatsu, 45, secretary general of Japan's No. 1 opposition party, the Socialists, gave a street speech for the party's only candidate in the first district of Chiba, with 1,457,781 voters. Twenty people listened.
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NEWS
July 15, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this capital city of Tokyo's neighboring prefecture (state), a campaign debacle that could help Japan's beleaguered ruling Liberal Democrats was played out for all to see Wednesday. Four days before a crucial election for the lower house of Parliament, Hirotaka Akamatsu, 45, secretary general of Japan's No. 1 opposition party, the Socialists, gave a street speech for the party's only candidate in the first district of Chiba, with 1,457,781 voters. Twenty people listened.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1994 | C. Scott Littleton, C. Scott Littleton is a professor of anthropology at Occidental College and currently a senior Fulbright researcher at Waseda University, Tokyo. and
At first glance, Japanese politics appears to be in total chaos. Prime ministers come and go with a frequency rivaled only by that of Italy. The Hosokawa government lasted barely six months, and the Hata government recently resigned after less than two months in office.
OPINION
January 2, 1994 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead, a contributing editor to Opinion, is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin). He is now writing a book about U.S. foreign policy
When the Cold War ended and the Berlin Wall came down, many people looked for huge political changes in Eastern Europe and expected that the rest of the world--what we used to call the Free World during the Cold War--would stay pretty much unchanged. It hasn't worked out that way, and there are important lessons here for the United States to learn. In Eastern Europe the communists, ex- and not-very-ex, are on a roll.
MAGAZINE
August 9, 1992 | JEFF SHEAR, Jeff Shear is a Washington-based writer who is working on a book about the FSX fighter deal with Japan. It will be published in fall, 1993, by St. Martin's Press.
LAST MARCH, IN A PREFECTURE NORTH OF TOKYO, A GUNMAN CHARGED OUT of the audience just as the aged politician the Japanese call "the shadow shogun" finished his speech. Security men assumed he was a photographer hurrying past. He opened fire within 15 feet of his target. Three rapid shots rang out.
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