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NEWS
September 20, 1994 | Times Wire Services
Conservative Prime Minister Carl Bildt resigned Monday, a day after voters brought back the Social Democrats to guide the country out of its economic crisis. After a campaign dominated by economic issues, the Social Democrats captured 45.6% of the vote Sunday, according to late returns. That's enough to return Ingvar Carlsson to the prime minister's post three years after he was ousted by a conservative coalition.
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WORLD
December 17, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - She's once, twice, three times a chancellor: Angela Merkel, Germany's first female leader, was sworn in Tuesday for her third term, underlining her dominance on the political scene in Europe's biggest economy. Merkel, 59, returns to power at a time when the region has yet to get back on its feet fully from its still-unresolved debt crisis, and as Germany's relations with the United States continue to suffer from the fallout over revelations that American spies tapped her phone and collected electronic data on ordinary Germans.
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NEWS
September 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The political party that built Sweden's high-tax welfare state and governed the nation for most of the past seven decades got its lowest support in national elections but was likely to retain power. With votes counted from all precincts, the Social Democrats had 36.6% of the vote, a steep plunge from the 45% they got four years ago and far short of the majority needed to govern without support from other parties.
OPINION
November 21, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
Now that the German elections are over, Germany and France will launch a great initiative to save the European project. Marking the centennial of 1914 and World War I, this will contrast favorably with the weak and confused leadership under which Europe stumbled 100 years ago. Before the May elections to the European Union Parliament, the Franco-German duo's decisive action and inspiring oratory will drive back the anti-EU parties that are gaining ground...
WORLD
September 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's party was routed in elections in the small western state of Saarland, where public anger over his cuts in social programs also boosted a small far-right party that benefited from the national mood of protest. Support for Schroeder's Social Democrats plunged to 30.8%, a loss of nearly 14 percentage points from 1999 and the lowest in the state since 1960.
NEWS
November 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Danish voters concerned that immigrants exploit the welfare system shifted to the right in parliamentary elections, handing the Liberal Party-led opposition victory over the Social Democrats. With 99% of the vote counted, the Liberal Party and its supporters, including the anti-immigration Danish People's Party, had won 98 seats in the 179-seat parliament. The ruling Social Democrats and their supporters won 77 seats, down from 89.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Portugal's Social Democrats said Tuesday that they will end the two-year-old coalition with Prime Minister Mario Soares' Socialists, but not until after Portugal enters the European Economic Community next week. The government is to sign the Common Market treaty June 12. Anibal Cavaco Silva, the Social Democrat leader, said the party's seven ministers will leave the centrist coalition Cabinet the following day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jiri Horak, 79, the first leader of the Czech Social Democratic Party after the fall of communism, died Friday of brain cancer at his home in Florida. Horak headed the Social Democrats from 1990 to 1992 after the so-called Velvet Revolution, led by playwright and democracy activist Vaclav Havel, peacefully toppled communist rule. In 1993, Horak moved back to the U.S., where he had immigrated in 1951, three years after the Communist Party took power in what was then Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | Reuters
The German Social Democrats, in disarray after this month's crushing election defeat, Monday turned to a clean-cut state premier, Bjorn Engholm of Schleswig-Holstein, for new leadership. Engholm told reporters after an SPD ruling council meeting that he will run for chairman at a party congress in May when Hans-Jochen Vogel steps down from the job.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Social democrats who went into exile six years ago and made an alliance with armed guerrillas are slowly sending some of their members back into the country to organize opposition to the government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte. Some of them, grouped in the Revolutionary Democratic Front, say that as the war has drawn out, they have become concerned about losing their political base among students, union members and professional people.
WORLD
November 20, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
In a bid to save money, time and the environment, the European Parliament voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to abandon its redundant meeting site in the French city of Strasbourg and gather instead at bloc headquarters in Brussels. But as convincing as the 483-141 vote was in highlighting the waste of having 766 Brussels-based lawmakers shuttle to Strasbourg for mandatory monthly sessions, the decision is likely to be only symbolic for the time being. Under European Union rules dating to the parliament's founding in 1952, any fundamental change in operations must be approved unanimously by what are now 28 member states.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- While Americans struggle with a shut-down government, Germans are still struggling to form one, with the latest attempt by Chancellor Angela Merkel to woo a new coalition partner ending in failure Wednesday. Germany has now gone nearly a month without a proper government since voters went to the polls Sept. 22. Merkel emerged triumphant from the election with a mandate for a third term, but her conservative bloc fell a handful of seats short of a majority in the Bundestag, the lower house of parliament.
OPINION
September 27, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
So the German people have spoken, and Chancellor Angela Merkel has been reelected. That means the European Union will continue to be a tortoise. Next May, following the European Parliament elections, we will discover just how slow and unhappy a creature it is. Then, across the next decade, a larger, Aesopian question will be posed: Can the European tortoise outrun the American eagle and the Chinese dragon? Or can it at least keep pace with them? Resounding though Mutti ("Mom") Merkel's election victory was, Germany's new government still has to be formed.
WORLD
September 22, 2013 | By Jeevan Vasagar
BERLIN - Angela Merkel appeared to have won a third term as chancellor in Germany's elections Sunday, according to the first exit poll, but she faces tricky negotiations to form a coalition with the left-wing opposition after a surge in support for a new party opposed to Europe's single currency. The exit poll results, released by state broadcaster ARD after voting ended at 6 p.m., showed Merkel's conservative Christian Democrats, or CDU, at 42%, leading the main opposition Social Democrats by 16 percentage points.
WORLD
September 22, 2013 | By Jeevan Vasagar
BERLIN - Angela Merkel's conservatives won a major victory in Sunday's German elections, according to official results, putting her in position to serve a third term as chancellor after negotiations to form a coalition with the left-wing opposition. The results showed Merkel's Christian Democratic Union at 41.5%, leading the main opposition Social Democrats by 17 percentage points. A new party founded in opposition to the euro, the Alternative for Germany, received 4.7% of the vote, below the 5% threshold needed to enter Parliament.
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - With U.S. prosecutors having filed criminal charges against Edward Snowden, attention turned Saturday to Hong Kong, whose authorities now must decide how to proceed with the case of the self-proclaimed National Security Agency leaker believed to be holed up in the Chinese territory. At a brief news conference Saturday, Hong Kong Police Commissioner Andy Tsang said only that the matter would be handled according to law, and refused to answer a question about whether Snowden was in a police "safe house.
NEWS
June 16, 1986 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The ruling Christian Democratic coalition narrowly retained power in a state parliamentary election Sunday in the West German state of Lower Saxony, with political opponents offering conflicting views on the impact on Chancellor Helmut Kohl's chances of victory in next January's federal elections. The conservative Christian Democrats' share of the vote declined by 6.4% from the last election four years ago, while the opposition Social Democrats' share rose by 5.6%.
NEWS
August 14, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leader of Germany's main opposition party Friday signaled his willingness to allow the unrestricted participation of German military forces in U.N. peacekeeping operations. "For deployment (of German forces) as part of 'blue helmet' actions and all the consequences that result from such actions, we say 'yes,' " declared Social Democratic Chairman Rudolf Scharping in an interview printed in Friday's editions of the mass-circulation newspaper Bild Zeitung.
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- The case of Edward Snowden, who is accused of criminal theft of government property and other charges in the U.S., has galvanized civic groups in Hong Kong where the self-proclaimed leaker has been holed up for weeks. Many in Hong Kong regard the decision of whether to extradite Snowden as a test of the city's autonomy vis-à-vis Beijing. The territory of 7 million residents has its own legal system apart from the mainland's. Hong Kong Police Commissioner Andy Tsang said Saturday during a brief news conference that the matter would be handled according to law. He refused to answer a question about whether Snowden was in a police “safe house.” After initially spending time in a Hong Kong hotel, Snowden reportedly moved to a private residence.
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