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May 8, 1994 | CARLA SANGER, Carla Sanger, 49, is executive director of L.A.'s Better Educated Students for Tomorrow, an after-school program that serves 3,800 children ages 5 to 14 at a dozen inner-city schools in Los Angeles. Sanger has a master's degree in education from Goucher College in Baltimore, and has worked in education in the public and private sectors. She was interviewed by Nancy Slate. and
For over 25 years, I have been involved with education and children's programs, first as an elementary school teacher and later as a supervisor and director of after-school programs. In 1988, I was appointed by then-Mayor Tom Bradley to the Education Council that developed L.A.'s BEST. As with so many councils, I sat there fat and dumb and happy, until I was asked to visit some of the school sites. When I did, I was overcome with disappointment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 15, 2014
Re "Whether it's bikes or bytes, teens are teens," April 13 danah boyd articulates the practical aspects of technology on teenagers' wired brains - although some of her claims can be argued - but she fails to address the more worrisome injurious effect, such as the exclusion of deep thinking and social development. Social development cannot be acquired through the cyber world because body language, facial expressions and the ability to evaluate someone's emotional reactions cannot be assessed without face-to-face interaction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1985
Jerry Falwell's remarks that the American people are ill-informed and that apartheid is "a social development," "not government policy," reveal him to be either an insufferable fool or a vicious liar. DEREK CORDIER Hollywood
OPINION
June 22, 2009
Re "A call for unity, not hate," Column, June 16 Bravo. Your column about our debt to the African American community, with the historical background you provided, was a wake-up call to all Latinos to acknowledge this group's contributions to our own social development in this wonderful country. But I wonder whether most of the people who need to know these facts read or care? Many first-generation Latinos feel more allegiance to their hometowns and ignore their neighborhoods, while African Americans continue to provide leadership in our communities, creating programs that often benefit the Latino residents more than themselves.
OPINION
April 15, 2014
Re "Whether it's bikes or bytes, teens are teens," April 13 danah boyd articulates the practical aspects of technology on teenagers' wired brains - although some of her claims can be argued - but she fails to address the more worrisome injurious effect, such as the exclusion of deep thinking and social development. Social development cannot be acquired through the cyber world because body language, facial expressions and the ability to evaluate someone's emotional reactions cannot be assessed without face-to-face interaction.
OPINION
June 22, 2009
Re "A call for unity, not hate," Column, June 16 Bravo. Your column about our debt to the African American community, with the historical background you provided, was a wake-up call to all Latinos to acknowledge this group's contributions to our own social development in this wonderful country. But I wonder whether most of the people who need to know these facts read or care? Many first-generation Latinos feel more allegiance to their hometowns and ignore their neighborhoods, while African Americans continue to provide leadership in our communities, creating programs that often benefit the Latino residents more than themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1988
LAPD has got it grotesquely wrong. The raison d'etre for police is to keep people from being hurt, not use the taxpayers as bait. By whose dispensation does it become "strategically" permissible to watch people get beat up after swearing an oath to uphold and enforce the law? Where is the subsequent payoff for allowing an individual violent act to take place? This is not the same thing as the patient narcotic detective who watches the retailer in order to catch the big fish. For a sworn peace officer to watch a crime against a person take place without interceding defies justification; for there to be a policy permitting this is irrational.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The State Department on Monday denied charges by three congressmen that U.S. economic aid to El Salvador is secretly being used to fund the nation's war against Communist rebels and that some of it is being stolen by corrupt Salvadoran government officials. Department spokesman Charles Redman said that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1992 | Times Researcher CATHERINE GOTTLIEB
Many businesses and public agencies rushed to give jobs to teens from areas hardest hit by the Los Angeles riots, but the Stuart M. Ketchum Downtown YMCA took another approach. Building on existing activities, the downtown "Y" designed a program to provide teens with both job opportunities and the attitudes, self-confidence, and skills to help them hold onto new jobs and succeed down the road. "Our point of departure is always people--understanding people and giving them the kind of experience they need, meeting them where they are," explains Robert A. Wilkins, associate executive director of community programs.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This dusty ranching town looks and feels a lot like Texas. The biggest happening within miles is the weekly cattle auction. The landscape is flat, dry savannah. Late last century, the town served as the capital of a maverick white republic whose flag featured a single star. But when William Langeveldt moved back home to Vryburg a few years ago after living in the United States, he was reminded of an American town during the civil rights struggle. "Vryburg is the Birmingham, Ala.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This dusty ranching town looks and feels a lot like Texas. The biggest happening within miles is the weekly cattle auction. The landscape is flat, dry savannah. Late last century, the town served as the capital of a maverick white republic whose flag featured a single star. But when William Langeveldt moved back home to Vryburg a few years ago after living in the United States, he was reminded of an American town during the civil rights struggle. "Vryburg is the Birmingham, Ala.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | CARLA SANGER, Carla Sanger, 49, is executive director of L.A.'s Better Educated Students for Tomorrow, an after-school program that serves 3,800 children ages 5 to 14 at a dozen inner-city schools in Los Angeles. Sanger has a master's degree in education from Goucher College in Baltimore, and has worked in education in the public and private sectors. She was interviewed by Nancy Slate. and
For over 25 years, I have been involved with education and children's programs, first as an elementary school teacher and later as a supervisor and director of after-school programs. In 1988, I was appointed by then-Mayor Tom Bradley to the Education Council that developed L.A.'s BEST. As with so many councils, I sat there fat and dumb and happy, until I was asked to visit some of the school sites. When I did, I was overcome with disappointment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1992 | Times Researcher CATHERINE GOTTLIEB
Many businesses and public agencies rushed to give jobs to teens from areas hardest hit by the Los Angeles riots, but the Stuart M. Ketchum Downtown YMCA took another approach. Building on existing activities, the downtown "Y" designed a program to provide teens with both job opportunities and the attitudes, self-confidence, and skills to help them hold onto new jobs and succeed down the road. "Our point of departure is always people--understanding people and giving them the kind of experience they need, meeting them where they are," explains Robert A. Wilkins, associate executive director of community programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1988
LAPD has got it grotesquely wrong. The raison d'etre for police is to keep people from being hurt, not use the taxpayers as bait. By whose dispensation does it become "strategically" permissible to watch people get beat up after swearing an oath to uphold and enforce the law? Where is the subsequent payoff for allowing an individual violent act to take place? This is not the same thing as the patient narcotic detective who watches the retailer in order to catch the big fish. For a sworn peace officer to watch a crime against a person take place without interceding defies justification; for there to be a policy permitting this is irrational.
NEWS
November 17, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The State Department on Monday denied charges by three congressmen that U.S. economic aid to El Salvador is secretly being used to fund the nation's war against Communist rebels and that some of it is being stolen by corrupt Salvadoran government officials. Department spokesman Charles Redman said that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1985
Jerry Falwell's remarks that the American people are ill-informed and that apartheid is "a social development," "not government policy," reveal him to be either an insufferable fool or a vicious liar. DEREK CORDIER Hollywood
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Watching just a short bit of the wildly popular kids TV show "SpongeBob SquarePants" has been known to give many parents headaches. Psychologists have now found that a brief exposure to SpongeBob, Patrick, Squidward and the rest of the crew also appears to dampen preschoolers' brain power. Angeline Lillard and Jennifer Peterson, both of the University of Virginia's department of psychology, wanted to see whether watching fast-paced television had an immediate influence on kids' executive function -- skills including attention, working memory, problem solving and delay of gratification that are associated with success in school.
HOME & GARDEN
March 16, 2006 | Dawn Bonker, Special to The Times
OH, those little sisters can be pesky. Just ask Avery Lopez, 7, who shares a bedroom with one. She and Sophia, 5, sometimes squabble over toys or who won a game. "When she's in the room," Avery declares, "she's loud." But both sisters say they would rather share than separate. "If I had my own room," Avery says, "it won't be as fun." The sentiment is sweet -- and increasingly old-fashioned.
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