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MAGAZINE
August 30, 1992
China's one-child policy is Orwellian social engineering on the moral level of apartheid. Shouldn't that nation be treated the way South Africa was, instead of being a "most favored nation"? HOWARD AHMANSON Irvine
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NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sara Lessley
Is healthcare a privilege or a right?  As Times consumer columnist David Lazarus wrote Friday: “One of the most striking take-aways from this week's U.S. Supreme Court hearings on the healthcare reform law was the steadfast insistence on the part of Republicans to deny affordable and accessible medical treatment to as many people as possible.” Lazarus added that “that means some sort of requirement that everyone have health coverage...
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MAGAZINE
May 19, 1991
An economical (for the citizenry) near-term solution has two parts: Raise the speed limit to 80 mph in all but the right-most freeway lanes, and abolish the ludicrous imbecility of the diamond lane. The air fills with smog from accelerating and braking cars. The freeways and our lives are crippled by absurd exercises in social engineering. Los Angeles lives or dies by its effortless traffic flow, not by its banal political rhetoric or its venal dreamspinning advisers. ALAN M. SCHWARTZ Irvine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The bullet trains that would someday streak through California at 220 mph are, in the vision of their most ardent supporters, more than just a transportation system. They are also a means to alter the state's social, residential and economic fabric. But those broader ambitions are triggering an increasingly strident ideological backlash to the massive project. The fast trains connecting Los Angeles and San Francisco would create new communities of high-density apartments and small homes around stations, reducing the suburbanization of California, rail advocates say. That new lifestyle would mean fewer cars and less gasoline consumption, lowering California's contribution to global warming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1999
Re "Hillary Clinton-Style Social-Worker Liberalism Has Some Dark Areas," Commentary, Aug. 19: Alexander Cockburn misses the point when he asks how Hillary Clinton reacts to the study that correlates increases in abortion rates with reduced crime rates and concludes that how she would respond to that question is important. Socially engineered "beneficial social cleansing" may or may not result from abortion; Roe vs. Wade was and is about a woman's right to choose, whatever her motivation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999
Your editorial, "High Density Makes Sense," Jan. 10, is filled with "new urbanist" boilerplate. "Transit planners really do understand . . . the public's multi-billion dollar investment in rail"? Hardly. Statistics on the subject on Portland's rail system and the homes built to be serviced by it (Oregon's "pride," funded by the entire state!) show 9 out of 10 of those residents take their cars not light rail. Reason magazine blows the lid off the lies told by urban planners and their love of social engineering.
NEWS
December 21, 1990
Thank you for the article labeled "How Long Can We Live?" (Dec. 4). It raises a question I believe needs a lot of discussion and debate: Do we really want to live longer? Recently, I was introduced to the conditions and treatment of the elderly infirm under the current medical system. It is a world of Medicare, HMOs, nursing homes, confusing guidelines, red tape, pain, changing roles, ineffective methods and much finger-pointing as each segment tries to blame others for the system's problems.
OPINION
January 27, 2003 | Kevin D. Mitnick, Kevin D. Mitnick is the co-author, with William L. Simon, of "The Art of Deception" (John Wiley & Sons, 2002) and co-founder of a Los Angeles-based information security company. He served five years in federal prison; his three years of federal supervised release, which tightly restricted his use of technology, ended last week.
Corporate security is an illusion. So is personal financial privacy. I should know; I spent five years of my life in federal prison for proving it. A recent survey by the Computer Security Institute and the FBI found that 90% of U.S. firms responding had detected security breaches during the preceding year.
OPINION
December 24, 2004
In your Dec. 20 editorial "Unconnected Dots," you point out that the administration's spin with respect to the reform of Social Security is as equally disingenuous as that used to sell the war in Iraq. In the same issue, you note that President Bush is sidestepping the Medicare problem, which the U.S. comptroller general acknowledges to be much bigger, much more immediate and much more difficult to address than the Social Security issue ("Medicare's Troubles May Be Sleeping Giant").
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sara Lessley
Is healthcare a privilege or a right?  As Times consumer columnist David Lazarus wrote Friday: “One of the most striking take-aways from this week's U.S. Supreme Court hearings on the healthcare reform law was the steadfast insistence on the part of Republicans to deny affordable and accessible medical treatment to as many people as possible.” Lazarus added that “that means some sort of requirement that everyone have health coverage...
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Andrew Bosworth, 29, is the director of engineering at Facebook Inc. and inventor of the social networking site's News Feed, a feature that broadcasts what your friends are doing on Facebook. He created the Palo Alto company's engineering boot camp, which helps new recruits get up to speed on Facebook's computer code and culture. A photographer who takes snapshots of company events, he's also something of an unofficial Facebook historian. Lucky encounter: Bosworth met his future boss at Harvard University in 2004.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Steve Mansfield operates his own Internet search engine from a place he calls a secret hide-out -- a small office surrounded by low-rent apartments on the outskirts of Lexington, Ky., a college town known for its horse farms. Mansfield conceived PreFound.com a few years ago on the premise that humans, from pretty much anywhere, can collectively provide better intelligence than a computer program developed out of Silicon Valley. Other start-ups, too, have had similar visions for "social search."
OPINION
December 24, 2004
In your Dec. 20 editorial "Unconnected Dots," you point out that the administration's spin with respect to the reform of Social Security is as equally disingenuous as that used to sell the war in Iraq. In the same issue, you note that President Bush is sidestepping the Medicare problem, which the U.S. comptroller general acknowledges to be much bigger, much more immediate and much more difficult to address than the Social Security issue ("Medicare's Troubles May Be Sleeping Giant").
OPINION
April 21, 2004 | Gary Marcus, Gary Marcus, an associate professor of psychology at New York University, is the author of "The Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates the Complexity of Human Thought" (Basic Books, 2004).
The human brain has been described as everything from the "last frontier" and "biology's greatest challenge" to "the most elaborate structure in the known universe" and Woody Allen's "second-favorite organ." With rapid advances in biotechnology and basic sciences such as genetics, neuroscience and psychology, we will soon have a radically improved understanding of the contribution of genes to the developing brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2004 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
The Assembly on Thursday refused to eliminate a $40-million state tax break for businesses that buy three-ton and heavier sport-utility vehicles. Lawmakers soundly defeated a bill that would have narrowed a state tax write-off worth up to $25,000 a year for those who buy the biggest SUVs for their businesses. The bill, by Assemblyman Joe Nation (D-San Rafael), would have used the savings to give a $1,000 tax credit to people who buy electric and alternative-fuel vehicles.
OPINION
January 27, 2003 | Kevin D. Mitnick, Kevin D. Mitnick is the co-author, with William L. Simon, of "The Art of Deception" (John Wiley & Sons, 2002) and co-founder of a Los Angeles-based information security company. He served five years in federal prison; his three years of federal supervised release, which tightly restricted his use of technology, ended last week.
Corporate security is an illusion. So is personal financial privacy. I should know; I spent five years of my life in federal prison for proving it. A recent survey by the Computer Security Institute and the FBI found that 90% of U.S. firms responding had detected security breaches during the preceding year.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Andrew Bosworth, 29, is the director of engineering at Facebook Inc. and inventor of the social networking site's News Feed, a feature that broadcasts what your friends are doing on Facebook. He created the Palo Alto company's engineering boot camp, which helps new recruits get up to speed on Facebook's computer code and culture. A photographer who takes snapshots of company events, he's also something of an unofficial Facebook historian. Lucky encounter: Bosworth met his future boss at Harvard University in 2004.
OPINION
April 21, 2004 | Gary Marcus, Gary Marcus, an associate professor of psychology at New York University, is the author of "The Birth of the Mind: How a Tiny Number of Genes Creates the Complexity of Human Thought" (Basic Books, 2004).
The human brain has been described as everything from the "last frontier" and "biology's greatest challenge" to "the most elaborate structure in the known universe" and Woody Allen's "second-favorite organ." With rapid advances in biotechnology and basic sciences such as genetics, neuroscience and psychology, we will soon have a radically improved understanding of the contribution of genes to the developing brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2002 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing California's huge budget shortfall and its growing number of overweight children, a state lawmaker is proposing a new tax on soda to fight childhood obesity. The idea is given little chance of passing, at least not in this election year, but it's reigniting an old debate at the Capitol about the proper role of tax policy as a social engineering tool. The California Soda Tax Act by Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1999
Re "Hillary Clinton-Style Social-Worker Liberalism Has Some Dark Areas," Commentary, Aug. 19: Alexander Cockburn misses the point when he asks how Hillary Clinton reacts to the study that correlates increases in abortion rates with reduced crime rates and concludes that how she would respond to that question is important. Socially engineered "beneficial social cleansing" may or may not result from abortion; Roe vs. Wade was and is about a woman's right to choose, whatever her motivation.
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