Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSocial Experiment
IN THE NEWS

Social Experiment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
September 3, 2013 | By David Horsey
For the first time in the history of humanity, children can easily be exposed to the most extreme, misogynistic sex acts imaginable, thanks to the phenomenon of Internet porn. Before the Internet Age, kids learned about sex in a variety of ways. In more repressed societies, it was a fumbling guessing game; in more open places, there were ceremonies, rituals, wise elders and careful teachers who ushered young folks into the mysteries of human sexuality.  For baby boomer boys, such as me, the ritual was standing nervously in front of a drugstore magazine rack and surreptitiously slipping a Playboy between the pages of a Sports Illustrated.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 3, 2013 | By David Horsey
For the first time in the history of humanity, children can easily be exposed to the most extreme, misogynistic sex acts imaginable, thanks to the phenomenon of Internet porn. Before the Internet Age, kids learned about sex in a variety of ways. In more repressed societies, it was a fumbling guessing game; in more open places, there were ceremonies, rituals, wise elders and careful teachers who ushered young folks into the mysteries of human sexuality.  For baby boomer boys, such as me, the ritual was standing nervously in front of a drugstore magazine rack and surreptitiously slipping a Playboy between the pages of a Sports Illustrated.
Advertisement
OPINION
April 8, 2011 | By Peter Lovenheim
When I was growing up in upstate New York in the late 1950s and '60s, people didn't exercise in public the way they do now. You didn't see adults jogging, biking or power-walking on the street. Except one. Nearly every day, a middle-aged woman of slight build walked rapidly through our suburban neighborhood, usually with her head down. No one knew her name, so we called her the Walker. She usually wore a simple blue or yellow dress, if memory serves, and when it rained she would wear a clear plastic raincoat with a hood pulled over her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Week the Women Went," which premieres Tuesday on Lifetime and strips a tiny South Carolina town of its adult female citizens for seven days - not all of them, probably, but a lot of them - describes itself repeatedly as a "social experiment": a "groundbreaking social experiment," "a social experiment of biblical proportions. " "I'm really excited about this whole social experiment," says one young woman, on board with the program. As for being "groundbreaking," it is a remake of a BBC series already franchised elsewhere.
NEWS
September 23, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They all talk about the quiet. No more late night party music blaring from neighbors' apartments. No more drug deals outside the bedroom window. No more gunshots disturbing their sleep and haunting their lives. "The only noise here is the cars," said Maricela Quintanar, who moved with her family from an East Los Angeles public housing project to an apartment on the Westside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995 | TIM MAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It has been called a buyout, a payoff, a slush fund and a bribe. But whatever it is labeled, most residents of Lake View Terrace, an eclectic area of horse ranches and blight, say the deal--taking $5 million from the city of Los Angeles in exchange for living within smelling distance of Lopez Canyon Landfill--was like making a pact with the devil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1989
The way Samuelson describes it, "our style of adolescence is now a type of curse." "Our teen-agers," Samuelson maintains, "live in a dreamland. It's a curious mixture of adult freedoms and childlike expectations." Samuelson then cites school statistics to make the case that American children enter the workplace "with poor skills." We experienced a revolution in personal attitudes in the last 20 years. Freedom is rife, and so are the ills that freedom inevitably brings (crime, drugs, truancy, etc.)
REAL ESTATE
December 27, 1998
Will you please refrain from quoting anyone whose idealism can be summed up in the phrase, "I really like the diversity of the neighborhood" ("Craftsman's Cradle," Dec. 13)? This politically correct phrase belongs on the scrap heap of "some of my best friends are. . . ." I wouldn't justify my choice of housing with, "I wanted a 'diverse' neighborhood." I wanted a house I could afford. It turns out that house is in a neighborhood that includes Hispanics, Indonesians, blacks, whites--and so what?
OPINION
October 11, 2008
Re "Teaching to the marriage test," Opinion, Oct. 4 Is Meghan Daum really saying that it is useless to fret about what is taught in the schools about marriage because American culture is already flooded with irresponsible marital messages anyway? As a parent, I think it is my responsibility to do all I can to set the standard for my children's understanding of marriage through every venue possible, precisely because of "popular culture's collective and ongoing celebration of same-sex marriage" and the onslaught of media messages that "confuse the long-term implications of marriage with the short-term gratification of wedding and honeymoon planning."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
All the elements were in place for a by-the-numbers hip-hop album launch party. Flowing Champagne? Check. Well-heeled crowd of music industry grandees and boldfaced names? Check. Exclusive venue? Check. Gaggle of impossibly curvaceous naked women on display for all to ogle? Double check. Except this by-invitation-only "listening event" -- really, the first time multi-platinum-selling, Grammy-winning rapper-producer Kanye West's album "808s & Heartbreak" had ever been played in public -- deconstructed the very idea of what an album unveiling is supposed to be. With collaborator Vanessa Beecroft, he reassembled it all into something closer to the Renaissance artistic ideal of the sublime than any hip-hop-rooted pop offering has any right to be. Call it a listening party as social experiment.
OPINION
April 8, 2011 | By Peter Lovenheim
When I was growing up in upstate New York in the late 1950s and '60s, people didn't exercise in public the way they do now. You didn't see adults jogging, biking or power-walking on the street. Except one. Nearly every day, a middle-aged woman of slight build walked rapidly through our suburban neighborhood, usually with her head down. No one knew her name, so we called her the Walker. She usually wore a simple blue or yellow dress, if memory serves, and when it rained she would wear a clear plastic raincoat with a hood pulled over her head.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
On "The Tonight Show," Conan O'Brien used to get big laughs for mocking Twitter as an egotistical stream of mundane updates from celebrities. But when he got bounced from his late-night gig at NBC, O'Brien could no longer take to the airwaves to reach his fans, so Twitter became his open hailing frequency. He later thanked Twitter "for saving my ass. " O'Brien isn't the only one who is tapping Twitter's mass-media potential. The social network, which will celebrate its five-year anniversary in March, last year signed up more than 100 million people who sent more than 25 billion updates called tweets.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2010 | By David Pierson
Six months after graduating from university, Guan Jian was unemployed and living in an 8-by-8-foot rented room on the fringes of this sprawling capital. His quarters were so hastily built that the landlord didn't bother to include a bathroom. When duty calls, Guan must trudge to the neighborhood toilet. Yet at $65 a month, it's all he can afford. Money is so tight at times that he has learned to suppress his hunger with a single steamed bun a day. This wasn't how things were supposed to be for Guan, a 24-year-old broadcast journalism graduate who sports an easy smile and has a love affair with foreign film.
OPINION
June 15, 2009
Re "Why aren't women happy? Who knows?" Opinion, June 11 I can only speak for the world-worn subset of bright, independent little girls of the '60s and '70s: Sometimes you just can't help but feel like you're the result of a failed social experiment. Gazelle Raye Wichner Pasadena
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2008 | Mitchell Landsberg
With just nine months left before it opens, a new arts high school in downtown Los Angeles still lacks a principal, a staff, a curriculum, a permanent name and a clearly articulated plan for how students will be selected -- critical details for a school that aims to be one of the foremost arts education institutions in the United States. Central High School No. 9 does have a completed campus, believed to be the second most expensive public high school ever built in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
All the elements were in place for a by-the-numbers hip-hop album launch party. Flowing Champagne? Check. Well-heeled crowd of music industry grandees and boldfaced names? Check. Exclusive venue? Check. Gaggle of impossibly curvaceous naked women on display for all to ogle? Double check. Except this by-invitation-only "listening event" -- really, the first time multi-platinum-selling, Grammy-winning rapper-producer Kanye West's album "808s & Heartbreak" had ever been played in public -- deconstructed the very idea of what an album unveiling is supposed to be. With collaborator Vanessa Beecroft, he reassembled it all into something closer to the Renaissance artistic ideal of the sublime than any hip-hop-rooted pop offering has any right to be. Call it a listening party as social experiment.
OPINION
June 15, 2009
Re "Why aren't women happy? Who knows?" Opinion, June 11 I can only speak for the world-worn subset of bright, independent little girls of the '60s and '70s: Sometimes you just can't help but feel like you're the result of a failed social experiment. Gazelle Raye Wichner Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1998 | PHILIP BRANDES
"The Great Experiment?," June Daniels' muddled social satire at the Lex Theatre, attempts to trace three decades of American greed through the misadventures of an American post-nuclear family, with erratic results. Cloaking lack of coherent vision in trendy absurdism, a series of snapshots traces the family's mutation from a frigid "Donna Reed Show" household to neurotic '90s wannabe entrepreneurs.
OPINION
October 11, 2008
Re "Teaching to the marriage test," Opinion, Oct. 4 Is Meghan Daum really saying that it is useless to fret about what is taught in the schools about marriage because American culture is already flooded with irresponsible marital messages anyway? As a parent, I think it is my responsibility to do all I can to set the standard for my children's understanding of marriage through every venue possible, precisely because of "popular culture's collective and ongoing celebration of same-sex marriage" and the onslaught of media messages that "confuse the long-term implications of marriage with the short-term gratification of wedding and honeymoon planning."
BUSINESS
January 25, 2008 | Brian Bergstein, The Associated Press
Beckie Tran doesn't have kids. That means she usually has no clue what presents to buy for her friends' children. Fortunately she gets advice from a separate group of buddies -- including people she's never even met. Tran gets those gift ideas, and tips on dozens of other kinds of products, from her network of friends on Kaboodle.com, a website devoted to the fast-growing Internet category of "social shopping."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|