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HEALTH
June 20, 2011 | By Shara Yurkiewicz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ms. R., a retired nurse, lives with her husband in Dorchester. She has two adult children living nearby whom she sees regularly. By the time I get to a patient's social history — almost always elicited last after an exhaustive 25-minute interview — I have about one or two minutes to learn about their marital status and children, who lives with them, other social support, occupation, and hobbies and interests. With my head spinning from trying to create a coherent narrative from non-chronological, incomplete, inaccurate retellings of current and past medical problems, I often go on autopilot: I skimp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Besides its all-inclusive historical sweep - from the first African to set foot in the New World to the first African American to occupy the White House - what distinguishes Henry Louis Gates Jr.'s new series, "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross," from many previous documentaries on the black experience is … Henry Louis Gates Jr. Gates, a Harvard professor and academic typhoon the world knows as "Skip," is one of the more familiar faces...
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1999 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Over the past several decades, contemporary art has increasingly been regarded as a commentary on its context. In sharp contrast, Sam Durant treats art as a powerful social force, a participatory event out of which new contexts unpredictably emerge.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
Election day was, by just about any measure, a landmark day in gay and lesbian history in the United States. Four states voted in referendums to support same-sex marriage, and we saw the first openly gay person elected to the U.S. Senate, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin. To reflect on these momentous events, I reached out to Craig M. Loftin, the author of two remarkable books released this year about gay and lesbian life in the 1950s and '60s: “Masked Voices: Gay and Lesbians in Cold War America,” and “Letters to ONE: Gay and Lesbian Voices from the 1950s and 1960s,” both published by the State University of New York Press.
BOOKS
May 3, 1987 | Jeffrey Meyers, Meyers has published biographies of Katherine Mansfield, Wyndham Lewis and Ernest Hemingway. "Manic Power: Robert Lowell and His Circle" (Arbor House) will appear this year. and
Christopher Hibbert's well-organized and comprehensive synthesis of 900 years of English social history has a clear and lively style and contains many odd facts and interesting anecdotes. He uses literary evidence effectively: Chaucer and Langland, Swift and Defoe, Cobbett and Dickens, and those two insatiable fornicators, Pepys and Boswell. He could also have used D. H.
BOOKS
December 1, 1996 | ANNE BERNAYS, Anne Bernays is the author of eight novels. Her latest book is "The Language of Names," co-authored with her husband, Justin Kaplan, to be published by Simon & Schuster in February
Public Relations (my rendering) has got to be the longest four-letter word of the 20th century. Known to some as "the dark side of advertising," its practitioners are, according to a new, hefty, undeniably important history of this un-American profession, the tireless, not to say somewhat paranoid, guardians of our economic, financial and social status quo. Stuart Ewen, author of "PR!
BOOKS
June 14, 1987 | Anne Hollander, Hollander is the author of "Seeing Through Clothes" (Viking). and
A swift overview of social dancing is offered by the four essays that make up this book, a set of quick turns around the floor to four different kinds of music while bright images flicker past the sweeping gaze.
BOOKS
August 3, 1986 | Ed Cray
Contrary to the admonition, you can sometimes tell a book by its (dust) cover. In this case, the publishers have adorned an uneven history of Ford Motor Co. and the willful dynasty that owns much of it with a color photograph of the glitzy 1939 Lincoln Zephyr. Not a workaday Model-T, the Ford automobile that wrought industrial, transportation and social revolutions, but a rich man's plaything, one that sold too few thousand copies to be anything more than an automobile collector's dream.
BOOKS
July 15, 1990
" . . . a rich social history that argues that much of contemporary homosexual identity, sense of community, and activism had its origin in the experience of gay men and women in World War II . . . a passionate book without ever becoming a polemical one." --Neil Miller
OPINION
July 27, 2006
Re "A Backstage Pass to Intimate Moments in Rock's Odyssey," Column One, July 22 I felt I was reading the first edition of a classic book in the article by the Times' former rock music critic, Robert Hilburn. Aside from the interesting information presented, Hilburn sparked a sense of the vast distance between myself and the creative genius of artists who memorialize social history. It was journalism at its best. DAVE LEGACKI San Pedro
HEALTH
June 20, 2011 | By Shara Yurkiewicz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ms. R., a retired nurse, lives with her husband in Dorchester. She has two adult children living nearby whom she sees regularly. By the time I get to a patient's social history — almost always elicited last after an exhaustive 25-minute interview — I have about one or two minutes to learn about their marital status and children, who lives with them, other social support, occupation, and hobbies and interests. With my head spinning from trying to create a coherent narrative from non-chronological, incomplete, inaccurate retellings of current and past medical problems, I often go on autopilot: I skimp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
A profile of Thomas P. Campbell in a recent issue of the New Yorker limns the Metropolitan Museum of Art's new director in what instantly became the standard portrait when news broke that he got the job last September. He's a scholarly and unassuming curator, not known for being adept at the social razzle-dazzle that generates publicity and philanthropy, and therefore a surprising choice to lead a major American art museum. The fact that Campbell's 2002 sleeper exhibition, "Tapestry in the Renaissance: Art and Magnificence," utterly transformed the place of monumental woven imagery in art's history books, all while drawing more than 200,000 wide-eyed visitors to the museum's darkened galleries, hovers in the background as a genuine if picturesque accomplishment for a director's portfolio, more quaint than indispensable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009 | Joal Ryan
While one can easily imagine Little Edie Beale's breathless excitement at being portrayed, in HBO's recent update of "Grey Gardens," by Drew Barrymore -- a Barrymore, by God! -- it is harder to imagine a time when the original version of "Grey Gardens" was, in a jarring word, demonized.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2008 | Sharon Mizota, Mizota is a freelance writer.
With more than 17,000 islands and about 300 ethnic groups, Indonesia is among the most culturally diverse countries in the world. So the exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art featuring 90-plus textile works from the collection of Mary Hunt Kahlenberg -- a onetime LACMA curator and co-owner of TAI Gallery/Textile Arts in Santa Fe, N.M. -- is appropriately eclectic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2008 | Gregory W. Griggs
California Lutheran University selected its seventh president Thursday. Chris Kimball, 52, of Thousand Oaks joined the private Lutheran university in eastern Ventura County in June 2006 as provost and vice president for academic affairs, officials said. He came to the college after serving as dean of faculty at Augsburg College in Minneapolis, where he had worked for 15 years. Kimball, a member of the Cal Lutheran history department, specializes in American history, particularly social history and the history of sport.
OPINION
September 1, 2007
Re "History can sing too," Opinion, Aug. 26 Richard Pells' article on present-day academia's focus on social history over social culture succeeds in illustrating America's fascination with the factual and definite and, subsequently, its hesitation with the artistic and the relative.
BOOKS
August 4, 1991 | Karen Stabiner
THE ADVENTURES OF AMOS 'N' ANDY: A Social History of an American Phenomenon by Melvin Patrick Ely (The Free Press: $22.95; 322 pp.). The early 1930s was the first time America could measure its enthusiasm for a media event clearly: stores, restaurants and movie theaters were empty as people stayed home to listen to the radio adventures of African-American men from the rural South who were making their way in the big city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
The most provocative and snappy entry in a trio show comes in the form of mixed-media paintings by Kevin Larmon. He begins with several well modulated underlayers of paint littered with barely visible appropriated images from art and popular culture. These peek through a final thick layer of buff-colored pigment that rises and lumps like one of those three-dimensional topographical maps at the natural history museum.
OPINION
August 26, 2007 | Richard Pells, Richard Pells is a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. His books include "Not Like Us: How Europeans Have Loved, Hated and Transformed American Culture Since World War II." A longer version of this article appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education.
How did George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" reflect both the Jewish and African American experience in America? Why was Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises" so influential for modern fiction and journalism? What was Abstract Expressionism, and why did Jackson Pollock become a cultural hero for many Americans in the 1950s? How did Marlon Brando's performance as Stanley Kowalski in "A Streetcar Named Desire" transform American acting, first on stage and then in the movies?
OPINION
July 27, 2006
Re "A Backstage Pass to Intimate Moments in Rock's Odyssey," Column One, July 22 I felt I was reading the first edition of a classic book in the article by the Times' former rock music critic, Robert Hilburn. Aside from the interesting information presented, Hilburn sparked a sense of the vast distance between myself and the creative genius of artists who memorialize social history. It was journalism at its best. DAVE LEGACKI San Pedro
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