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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | ROBERT B. REICH, Robert B. Reich, secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration, is a professor of economic and social policy at Brandeis University
In Washington, a "gaffe" occurs when a high-level official accidentally says what he means. The Bush administration has been remarkably gaffe-free so far, with almost everyone sticking to the same bland script. All except Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill, that is, whose gaffes offer a glimpse into the real philosophy of the Bush corporation that now runs the United States.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Never mind the conventional speculation about whether the resolution of some political standoff in Washington favors Republicans or Democrats, liberals or conservatives, "entitlement" fans or skeptics. The more fundamental question, says Benjamin Radcliff, is this: Does it make people happier or not? Radcliff is a political scientist at Notre Dame whose work places him in the forefront of what might be labeled happiness studies. His particular corner of the field looks at social policies and political outcomes.
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OPINION
January 17, 1999 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is co-editor of the American Prospect
The official Medicare advisory commission, whose report is due March 1, is on the verge of proposing a truly radical change. The proposal, sponsored by the commission's more conservative members, would transform Medicare from guaranteed social insurance into essentially a voucher program, in which the haves would enjoy far better care than the have-nots. Some background: Medicare is said to face a financial crisis because of the looming retirement of the baby-boom generation.
OPINION
September 28, 2013
Re "The GOP's Obama," Opinion, Sept. 24 Jonah Goldberg's comparison of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and President Obama is a sidesplitter. Just because both went to Harvard Law School doesn't mean they're similar. Cruz is intelligent, but he lacks common sense. He represents Texas, the state with the largest percentage of uninsured individuals, and he puts all his effort into defunding the Affordable Care Act. His own GOP colleagues have told him he doesn't have the votes to defund the healthcare law. Cruz is the albatross around the GOP's neck, and although everyone else can see it, he is unaware of the harm he is doing to his party and country.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Robert M. Ball is one of the most revered figures in Social Security history, a man whose devotion to safeguarding the program from ideological attacks and political cant over six decades made him the program's  "undisputed spiritual leader. " Alice M. Rivlin is a distinguished budget expert at the  Brookings Institution  whose willingness to promote "entitlement reform" (read: cut benefits) as a deficit nostrum has given her a reputation as a danger to Social Security and  Medicare . So when Rivlin was named the ninth recipient of the annual Robert M. Ball Award for Outstanding Achievements in Social Insurance this week, Social Security advocates erupted in fury.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
You might not realize this if you've been listening to all the warnings about "entitlements" emanating from Congress, but Social Security remains the nation's most popular government program -- and the vast majority of Americans want lawmakers to protect it, without cutting benefits. In fact, a sizable majority want Congress to raise benefits. Those conclusions, drawn from a recent opinion poll conducted for the National Academy of Social Insurance, an organization of social insurance experts, are worth keeping in mind as President Obama addresses the state of the union tonight and as budget battles continue in Washington.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The airy and inviting offices of Hydra display much the same self-help material as any other professional counseling center in Berlin: financial advice, legal seminars, fitness tips and retraining for those who want to start a new life.
OPINION
September 28, 2013
Re "The GOP's Obama," Opinion, Sept. 24 Jonah Goldberg's comparison of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and President Obama is a sidesplitter. Just because both went to Harvard Law School doesn't mean they're similar. Cruz is intelligent, but he lacks common sense. He represents Texas, the state with the largest percentage of uninsured individuals, and he puts all his effort into defunding the Affordable Care Act. His own GOP colleagues have told him he doesn't have the votes to defund the healthcare law. Cruz is the albatross around the GOP's neck, and although everyone else can see it, he is unaware of the harm he is doing to his party and country.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Never mind the conventional speculation about whether the resolution of some political standoff in Washington favors Republicans or Democrats, liberals or conservatives, "entitlement" fans or skeptics. The more fundamental question, says Benjamin Radcliff, is this: Does it make people happier or not? Radcliff is a political scientist at Notre Dame whose work places him in the forefront of what might be labeled happiness studies. His particular corner of the field looks at social policies and political outcomes.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Ed Lorenzen
In his March 22 blog post criticizing proposals to switch from the consumer price index to "chained CPI" to determine cost-of-living adjustments for Social Security beneficiaries and other items in the federal budget, Michael Hiltzik claimed that there were "no grounds" for the statement made in a recent paper from the Moment of Truth Project (" Measuring Up, The Case for Chained CPI" ) that the chained CPI provides a more accurate measure of inflation than the measure currently used.  In fact, experts across the ideological spectrum agree that the chained CPI is indeed more accurate.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Ed Lorenzen
In his March 22 blog post criticizing proposals to switch from the consumer price index to "chained CPI" to determine cost-of-living adjustments for Social Security beneficiaries and other items in the federal budget, Michael Hiltzik claimed that there were "no grounds" for the statement made in a recent paper from the Moment of Truth Project (" Measuring Up, The Case for Chained CPI" ) that the chained CPI provides a more accurate measure of inflation than the measure currently used.  In fact, experts across the ideological spectrum agree that the chained CPI is indeed more accurate.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Robert M. Ball is one of the most revered figures in Social Security history, a man whose devotion to safeguarding the program from ideological attacks and political cant over six decades made him the program's  "undisputed spiritual leader. " Alice M. Rivlin is a distinguished budget expert at the  Brookings Institution  whose willingness to promote "entitlement reform" (read: cut benefits) as a deficit nostrum has given her a reputation as a danger to Social Security and  Medicare . So when Rivlin was named the ninth recipient of the annual Robert M. Ball Award for Outstanding Achievements in Social Insurance this week, Social Security advocates erupted in fury.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
You might not realize this if you've been listening to all the warnings about "entitlements" emanating from Congress, but Social Security remains the nation's most popular government program -- and the vast majority of Americans want lawmakers to protect it, without cutting benefits. In fact, a sizable majority want Congress to raise benefits. Those conclusions, drawn from a recent opinion poll conducted for the National Academy of Social Insurance, an organization of social insurance experts, are worth keeping in mind as President Obama addresses the state of the union tonight and as budget battles continue in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | ROBERT B. REICH, Robert B. Reich, secretary of Labor in the Clinton administration, is a professor of economic and social policy at Brandeis University
In Washington, a "gaffe" occurs when a high-level official accidentally says what he means. The Bush administration has been remarkably gaffe-free so far, with almost everyone sticking to the same bland script. All except Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill, that is, whose gaffes offer a glimpse into the real philosophy of the Bush corporation that now runs the United States.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The airy and inviting offices of Hydra display much the same self-help material as any other professional counseling center in Berlin: financial advice, legal seminars, fitness tips and retraining for those who want to start a new life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | THEODORE R. MARMOR and MARK A. GOLDBERG and JONATHAN OBERLANDER, Theodore R. Marmor is a professor of public policy and management at the Yale School of Management. Mark A. Goldberg is a distinguished faculty fellow at the same school. Jonathan Oberlander is an assistant professor of social medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
The Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare, which had been due to report its recommendations March 1, is at an impasse--and not, as some of us might hope, because of objections to a proposal to convert Medicare into a voucher program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | THEODORE R. MARMOR and MARK A. GOLDBERG and JONATHAN OBERLANDER, Theodore R. Marmor is a professor of public policy and management at the Yale School of Management. Mark A. Goldberg is a distinguished faculty fellow at the same school. Jonathan Oberlander is an assistant professor of social medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
The Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare, which had been due to report its recommendations March 1, is at an impasse--and not, as some of us might hope, because of objections to a proposal to convert Medicare into a voucher program.
OPINION
August 24, 2011 | By Bill Craighead
Washington's renewed obsession with government budget deficits has become a major obstacle to dealing with the U.S. unemployment crisis. At the root of this misplaced focus are widespread misconceptions about the role of deficits in the economy. The fact that high unemployment and budget deficits are occurring at the same time has generated confusion about the real sources of the slump. The increased deficit is a consequence, not a cause, of the downturn. When economic activity falls, so does tax revenue.
OPINION
January 17, 1999 | ROBERT KUTTNER, Robert Kuttner is co-editor of the American Prospect
The official Medicare advisory commission, whose report is due March 1, is on the verge of proposing a truly radical change. The proposal, sponsored by the commission's more conservative members, would transform Medicare from guaranteed social insurance into essentially a voucher program, in which the haves would enjoy far better care than the have-nots. Some background: Medicare is said to face a financial crisis because of the looming retirement of the baby-boom generation.
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