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Social Mobility

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OPINION
August 31, 2011 | By Matthew Continetti
Where's Horatio Alger when you need him? When the caucuses and primaries arrive in 2012, Republican voters will be choosing among candidates who embody the promise of American life. Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann, both of whom came from humble beginnings, exemplify the continued possibility of social mobility. And Mitt Romney leads the life that many of us would like to have: wealth, a large family and multiple homes. What none of these candidates has done so far, though, is champion a social mobility agenda.
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BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and James Barragan
In his State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Obama will try to recharge his presidency by discussing the expansive divide between rich and poor in America. It's a crucial issue, and one with no easy solutions. Obama is expected to focus on the twin themes of income inequality and social mobility, which is the ability to move up the economic ladder. Wealth disparity has drawn enormous attention with the U.S. income gap at its highest level since the Great Depression.
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BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and James Barragan
In his State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Obama will try to recharge his presidency by discussing the expansive divide between rich and poor in America. It's a crucial issue, and one with no easy solutions. Obama is expected to focus on the twin themes of income inequality and social mobility, which is the ability to move up the economic ladder. Wealth disparity has drawn enormous attention with the U.S. income gap at its highest level since the Great Depression.
OPINION
December 26, 2013
Re "A huge threat to social mobility," Column, Dec. 22 Michael Hiltzik's piece on income inequality was excellent and had many good ideas. However, I was disturbed by the frequent use of the word "growth. " When one is referring to the economy, the growth should follow the word "sustainable. " Failing to consider sustainability is an example of short-term crisis thinking. We need long-term thinking that promotes equality among people and between humans and the planet. Uncontrolled growth has already contributed to overpopulation and climate change.
NEWS
April 30, 1995 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before affirmative action, there was merit. Or so the argument goes. You were admitted to college, hired for a job and promoted through the ranks not because you belonged to a disadvantaged racial or ethnic group but because you deserved it, by dint of hard work, superior effort and proven good results. Affirmative action, its opponents lament, subverted that most American of principles: that merit--not favor--is the fuel that propels you upward through the system.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
You may have missed it, given the launch of the Christmas shopping season and all the foofaraw about the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, but earlier this month Barack Obama gave the most important speech of his presidency. The topic was the rising level of economic inequality in America, which Obama identified as " the defining challenge of our time. " Numerous trends have come together over the last few decades, he said, to create "an economy that's become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | MOLLY MOORE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The pigtailed girl perched behind the battered desk in the first row glanced furtively out the classroom window. Her hand flashed a signal. Seconds later, a tiny rock wrapped in white paper pinged through the window grate and bounced onto the floor next to her desk. Within minutes, a hailstorm of white balls sailed through the open windows, and a dozen young girls scrambled to collect them. The barrage of cheat sheets marked the start of the school year's final exams--Indian style.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, Jill Leovy is a Times staff writer
At 5 in the afternoon, Eduardo Munoz is on his third cup of coffee and his 18th blue book. Over the next several days and nights, he will read about 100 more. The composition books have been all over town today--hauled first to his East L.A. College office, then to a coffee shop, and finally, after a 45-minute drive, back home. The changes of scene--Munoz's preferred remedy for weary eyes and flagging attention--have helped him get through grading one class so far. The tally: Eight dropouts.
OPINION
December 26, 2013
Re "A huge threat to social mobility," Column, Dec. 22 Michael Hiltzik's piece on income inequality was excellent and had many good ideas. However, I was disturbed by the frequent use of the word "growth. " When one is referring to the economy, the growth should follow the word "sustainable. " Failing to consider sustainability is an example of short-term crisis thinking. We need long-term thinking that promotes equality among people and between humans and the planet. Uncontrolled growth has already contributed to overpopulation and climate change.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | RITA J. SIMON, Rita J. Simon is the dean of the School of Justice at American University, Washington.
American society places a premium on individual success. Becoming rich is a sign of respectability and prestige. How the wealth is acquired is often not closely scrutinized. The results are more important than the means by which they were attained. For most people, hard work over many years is the route to relative success. What they cannot achieve in their lifetime, they hope their children will accomplish. The children will have had the benefits of more education and better opportunities.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
You may have missed it, given the launch of the Christmas shopping season and all the foofaraw about the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, but earlier this month Barack Obama gave the most important speech of his presidency. The topic was the rising level of economic inequality in America, which Obama identified as " the defining challenge of our time. " Numerous trends have come together over the last few decades, he said, to create "an economy that's become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2012 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
The idea of a large, stable middle class is central to America's sense of itself. But the U.S. middle class has been steadily shrinking, dropping from 61% of all adults 40 years ago to a bare majority now, a new study finds. This middle tier of American society also has slipped downward in terms of its income and wealth in the last decade, according to the report released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center. And it has lost a share of its traditional faith in the future. "The notion that we are a society with a large middle class, with lots of economic and social mobility and a belief that each generation does better than the next - these are among the core tenets of what it means to be an American," said Paul Taylor, the Pew Research Center's executive vice president.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
More than a decade after the dot-com bubble burst, technology stocks are once again the rage on Wall Street. Shares of companies specializing in social media, mobility, cloud computing, data analytics and location-based e-commerce have surged as much as 60% this year. And fund managers say the stocks have more room to run as demand builds for a new generation of smartphones and other products offering round-the-clock connectivity. Investors are especially excited about the fast revenue growth - and actual earnings - that many companies have achieved despite their relative youth.
OPINION
August 31, 2011 | By Matthew Continetti
Where's Horatio Alger when you need him? When the caucuses and primaries arrive in 2012, Republican voters will be choosing among candidates who embody the promise of American life. Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann, both of whom came from humble beginnings, exemplify the continued possibility of social mobility. And Mitt Romney leads the life that many of us would like to have: wealth, a large family and multiple homes. What none of these candidates has done so far, though, is champion a social mobility agenda.
OPINION
May 27, 2011 | By Karen Sternheimer
Americans don't seem bothered enough by the country's growing wealth divide to do much about it, according to a recent Harvard Business School survey. In part, that's probably because they vastly underestimate the gap, believing the top 20% own 59% of the nation's wealth when they actually own 84%. But there's another, less obvious reason for our passivity — the hope and glory pushed by an all-pervasive news, gossip and star-driven celebrity culture. The core of the American dream teaches us that the formula for achieving wealth involves hard work, determination and luck.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, Jill Leovy is a Times staff writer
At 5 in the afternoon, Eduardo Munoz is on his third cup of coffee and his 18th blue book. Over the next several days and nights, he will read about 100 more. The composition books have been all over town today--hauled first to his East L.A. College office, then to a coffee shop, and finally, after a 45-minute drive, back home. The changes of scene--Munoz's preferred remedy for weary eyes and flagging attention--have helped him get through grading one class so far. The tally: Eight dropouts.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2005 | James Flanigan
The Fourth of July weekend seems like a good time to examine some of the heat and rhetoric lately surrounding one of the basic building blocks of our society: immigration. There is widespread concern that too many immigrants are coming in and, worse, that waves of unskilled workers will form a permanent underclass and change the historic dynamic of American society. These are serious matters. Immigration is part of the DNA of America, and it's as necessary today as ever.
OPINION
May 27, 2011 | By Karen Sternheimer
Americans don't seem bothered enough by the country's growing wealth divide to do much about it, according to a recent Harvard Business School survey. In part, that's probably because they vastly underestimate the gap, believing the top 20% own 59% of the nation's wealth when they actually own 84%. But there's another, less obvious reason for our passivity — the hope and glory pushed by an all-pervasive news, gossip and star-driven celebrity culture. The core of the American dream teaches us that the formula for achieving wealth involves hard work, determination and luck.
NEWS
April 30, 1995 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before affirmative action, there was merit. Or so the argument goes. You were admitted to college, hired for a job and promoted through the ranks not because you belonged to a disadvantaged racial or ethnic group but because you deserved it, by dint of hard work, superior effort and proven good results. Affirmative action, its opponents lament, subverted that most American of principles: that merit--not favor--is the fuel that propels you upward through the system.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | MOLLY MOORE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The pigtailed girl perched behind the battered desk in the first row glanced furtively out the classroom window. Her hand flashed a signal. Seconds later, a tiny rock wrapped in white paper pinged through the window grate and bounced onto the floor next to her desk. Within minutes, a hailstorm of white balls sailed through the open windows, and a dozen young girls scrambled to collect them. The barrage of cheat sheets marked the start of the school year's final exams--Indian style.
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