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NATIONAL
May 20, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In 1958, the Gallup Poll asked Americans whether they approved or disapproved of marriage between blacks and whites. The response was overwhelming: 94% were opposed, a sentiment that held for decades. It took nearly 40 years until a majority of those surveyed said marriage between people of different skin colors was acceptable. By contrast, attitudes toward gays and lesbians have changed so much in just the last 10 years that, as Gallup reported last week, "half or more now agree that being gay is morally acceptable, that gay relations ought to be legal and that gay or lesbian couples should have the right to legally marry.
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NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
The Internet served as a contemporary confessional this week when a 22-year-old from Ohio posted a YouTube video in which he admitted to driving his car while drunk and killing a man. In a three-and-a-half-minute video, Matthew Cordle said he was driving the wrong way down a Columbus highway on the night of June 22, and crashed into a car driven by 61-year-old Vincent Canzani. “I killed a man,” says Cordle in the video, which begins with his face blurred and voice obscured as he narrates a night of bar-hopping and drinking to the point of blackout.
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BOOKS
August 2, 1987 | Harold Cruse, Cruse teaches at the University of Michigan and is the author of "The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual" (1967), "Rebellion of Revolution" (1968) and "Plural but Equal--Blacks and Minorities in America's Plural Society" (1987). and
The agonies of idealism, the exultation of commitment and the lost illusions at the end of the crusade when hard realities become the killers of inflated hopes--these are the themes that are woven into these two highly informative books. "Freedom Song" and "Free at Last" are about the Southern Black Civil Rights Movement of the '60s. The first has the quality of an extended diary by a former participant in the struggle, written in wistful retrospection; the other is contemporary reportage seeking out the facts of the political aftermath of the political results of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in the South of the 1980s.
OPINION
July 19, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
As crime in Los Angeles has dropped from the frightening levels of the 1990s to the astonishingly low rates of the last decade, pressure from residents and leaders to spend more money on law enforcement has turned into pressure to instead spend less, especially when so many other city services have been cut to accommodate shrinking budgets. But a well-trained police department with enough officers and expertise to respond rapidly to trouble isn't simply a previous era's priority. It is a perpetual need.
WORLD
July 16, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SÃO PAULO, Brazil -- A man died after a one-ton cow crashed through his roof and landed on him while he was asleep in bed, local press reported.   Authorities said the cow wandered down a hill and onto the top of the home of Joao Maria de Souza, 45, in the small city of Caratinga before crashing through a thin asbestos roof.   Maria de Souza was initially conscious after the blow on July 10, authorities said, but succumbed to injuries the next day.   The cow, which was reportedly uninjured, narrowly missed his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg's "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead" doesn't officially publish until next week, but it has already stirred controversy across the media, rallying both critics and defenders to its cause, and resulting in a backlash to the backlash.   The book, which Sandberg describes as "a sort of feminist manifesto," discusses the need for more women in powerful positions.  As Sandberg writes, “A truly equal world would be one where women ran half our countries and companies and men ran half our homes.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
The Internet served as a contemporary confessional this week when a 22-year-old from Ohio posted a YouTube video in which he admitted to driving his car while drunk and killing a man. In a three-and-a-half-minute video, Matthew Cordle said he was driving the wrong way down a Columbus highway on the night of June 22, and crashed into a car driven by 61-year-old Vincent Canzani. “I killed a man,” says Cordle in the video, which begins with his face blurred and voice obscured as he narrates a night of bar-hopping and drinking to the point of blackout.
WORLD
June 28, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SAO PAULO, Brazil - Less than a month ago, 19-year-old Marcelo Hotimsky was organizing protests against a bus fare hike with members of his small Free Fare Movement, which was widely dismissed as a group of unrealistic troublemakers. By Monday, he was in a meeting with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and discussing transportation policy. In a picture of the meeting published nationally, the shock of pink hair on the movement member known as Leiloca burst out in contrast against the dark suits in the chambers of power.
OPINION
June 24, 2012 | By Guillermo Trejo
The rise of a social media-based student movement is shaking up Mexico's July 1 presidential race. This is happening just as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI - which ruled for seven decades until its defeat in 2000 - seems poised to return to power. The movement, led by students from the country's leading private universities in Mexico City, aims to prevent the return of a PRI government and to democratize the mass media. Spreading rapidly throughout the country since May, it already has had a measurable impact, particularly among young voters and independents who represent 30% and 42% of the electorate, respectively.
WORLD
July 23, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
Iran's political crisis intensified Wednesday when the nation's main opposition figure announced that he would create a political organization to "lay the groundwork for a large-scale social movement" stemming from his disputed election loss to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
WORLD
July 16, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SÃO PAULO, Brazil -- A man died after a one-ton cow crashed through his roof and landed on him while he was asleep in bed, local press reported.   Authorities said the cow wandered down a hill and onto the top of the home of Joao Maria de Souza, 45, in the small city of Caratinga before crashing through a thin asbestos roof.   Maria de Souza was initially conscious after the blow on July 10, authorities said, but succumbed to injuries the next day.   The cow, which was reportedly uninjured, narrowly missed his wife.
WORLD
June 28, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins
SAO PAULO, Brazil - Less than a month ago, 19-year-old Marcelo Hotimsky was organizing protests against a bus fare hike with members of his small Free Fare Movement, which was widely dismissed as a group of unrealistic troublemakers. By Monday, he was in a meeting with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and discussing transportation policy. In a picture of the meeting published nationally, the shock of pink hair on the movement member known as Leiloca burst out in contrast against the dark suits in the chambers of power.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg's "Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead" doesn't officially publish until next week, but it has already stirred controversy across the media, rallying both critics and defenders to its cause, and resulting in a backlash to the backlash.   The book, which Sandberg describes as "a sort of feminist manifesto," discusses the need for more women in powerful positions.  As Sandberg writes, “A truly equal world would be one where women ran half our countries and companies and men ran half our homes.
OPINION
June 24, 2012 | By Guillermo Trejo
The rise of a social media-based student movement is shaking up Mexico's July 1 presidential race. This is happening just as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI - which ruled for seven decades until its defeat in 2000 - seems poised to return to power. The movement, led by students from the country's leading private universities in Mexico City, aims to prevent the return of a PRI government and to democratize the mass media. Spreading rapidly throughout the country since May, it already has had a measurable impact, particularly among young voters and independents who represent 30% and 42% of the electorate, respectively.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - In 1958, the Gallup Poll asked Americans whether they approved or disapproved of marriage between blacks and whites. The response was overwhelming: 94% were opposed, a sentiment that held for decades. It took nearly 40 years until a majority of those surveyed said marriage between people of different skin colors was acceptable. By contrast, attitudes toward gays and lesbians have changed so much in just the last 10 years that, as Gallup reported last week, "half or more now agree that being gay is morally acceptable, that gay relations ought to be legal and that gay or lesbian couples should have the right to legally marry.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Wayne Pacelle, the president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States, discusses his call for a new humane economy in his book, "The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them," being published April 5. You wrote that 35 years ago, there were only 65 million pets in this country. Now there are nearly triple that at 170 million dogs and cats, but there are only 50% more humans. What accounts for that? Americans have a love affair with dogs and cats, and they're becoming part of the fabric of our culture.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1997 | DENISE GELLENE
'Some call me Rev. Bartha," begins the online missive. "This is not about churches and Sundays. The devil needs the angel. Violence needs affection. No needs yes." Sound like the musings of a lunatic fringe? Exactly what Sega Soft wants Web surfers to believe. The ramblings are part of an unusual advertising campaign intended to create a buzz about Heat, an online game network being launched by Sega Soft this week.
NEWS
February 17, 1996 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the front lines of the resurgent United Farm Workers union, there is no escaping the past. Cesar Chavez, the union's deceased founder and patron saint, is everywhere, his face on placards, T-shirts and buttons, his name invoked as a battle cry. "Cesar Chavez!" the union's new leader, Arturo Rodriguez, shouted at a recent rally to organize rose workers here. "Presente!" the huddled campesinos roared back. Cesar is still with us.
WORLD
July 23, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
Iran's political crisis intensified Wednesday when the nation's main opposition figure announced that he would create a political organization to "lay the groundwork for a large-scale social movement" stemming from his disputed election loss to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Pirkle Jones, a California photographer admired for his stirring images of migrant workers, endangered landscapes and social movements, including a controversial series on the Black Panthers at the height of their activism in the late 1960s, died March 15 in San Rafael. He was 95. The cause was heart failure, said his assistant, Jennifer McFarland.
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