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BUSINESS
June 8, 2010 | David Lazarus
Harrison Tang cares about his privacy and takes elaborate steps to protect it. Your privacy is another matter. Tang, 27, is co-founder of a "people search" website called Spokeo, which serves up extraordinarily detailed profiles of pretty much everyone -- including you -- gleaned from online directories, databases and social networks. Don't take my word for it. Do a search for your name at Spokeo's website. "The Web is becoming more and more people-centric," Tang told me over coffee the other day. "We're just aggregating what's already out there."
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SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | Monte Morin
Ever feel the rainy-day blues on a bright and sunny afternoon? If so, your Facebook account may be to blame, according to new research. In a paper published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE, scientists argued that the hugely popular social networking site exerts an emotional "spillover" effect that may carry significant consequences for an increasingly interconnected world. By analyzing more than a billion Facebook status updates, authors concluded that emotionally positive posts gave rise to more positive posts by friends, while negative posts spawned more negative posts.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- After months of secrecy, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone has taken the wraps off Jelly , a new question-and-answer app for iOS and Android. The app is designed to give people answers from their social networks and will compete with similar services such as Quora. You can download Jelly by going to the company's website. What distinguishes Jelly: You can ask questions with images. Jelly is focused on images, which Stone says “add depth and context to any question.” You can crop an image, zoom in on something, even draw on the image to ask your question.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Perhaps anything is possible with social media -- but even so, this story caught me off guard: A man donated his kidney to a stranger after seeing a plea on Facebook. Jeff Kurze's kidneys were failing, according to the story . His wife, Roxy, posted on her wall in desperation: "Wishing a kidney would fall out of the sky so my husband can stop suffering," the 30-year-old Web designer wrote. "So if anyone knows of a live donor with type O blood, PLEASE let me know. " Ricky Cisco, a 25-year-old comedian, saw the post and messaged Roxy, saying he wanted to help.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The popular online social hangout Facebook Inc. says it is setting up a new system that will allow its 70 million users to take their personal profiles with them as they surf other websites. Users will be able to automatically copy pictures, personal information and other customized applications established on Facebook to other websites without extra effort once the changes that were announced Friday take effect. The privacy settings attached to a person's Facebook profile will remain in effect at external websites.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Borrowing from Twitter and other social networks, LinkedIn will now let its users follow specific individuals and receive their updates. The professional social network announced Tuesday that users will be able to subscribe to 150 "influential thought leaders" to receive their posts. Previously, LinkedIn users could get updates from companies and industries but not individuals unless those individuals approved the connection. LinkedIn follows other social networks who have this feature including Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Instagram.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Remember the good old days when all you had to worry about was what potential employers might find in a Google search? Now, some employers are asking for the keys to job applicants' virtual clubhouse so they can click around and get a better look. Reports are resurfacing about public agencies requiring applicants to allow them to log in for full access to their Facebook account. Is this in-depth social network profiling of a potential employee fair -- or legal? “I would argue that it's an invasion of privacy and violation of anti-discrimination law,” said employment attorney Amy Semmel of Kelley Semmel in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival starts Friday, and that means hundreds of thousands of smartphone users will descend on Indio. And when you get that many people in one location, there's bound to be some connectivity issues. That's why the four major wireless carriers say they're going out of their way to make sure there is enough network capacity for their customers to make calls, send texts and upload photos and videos to their social networks. Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint understand that at events such as Coachella -- where as many as 90,000 people may show up on one day -- users see just how good their networks are, and perhaps more important, how well their friends' carriers hold up. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 AT&T, for example, said it will be using all 18 beams of its super multi-beam antenna.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Flipboard, the personalized-magazine app, released a new feature Tuesday evening that lets users create and curate their own magazines based on content they find on the app and around the Internet. The app, which now has more than 50 million total users, is popular for its ability to create custom magazines for individual user based on their social networks and the publications they follow. But now, users on Flipboard will also be able to build and maintain their own magazines. The company is calling the new feature its biggest addition since the app itself launched on the iPad in 2010.
SCIENCE
November 26, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Scientists have uncovered a key property of comatose brains that differentiates them from normal brains and may explain what goes wrong during severe brain injury. The report , published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, utilizes graph theory, which uses data to determine how well connected each part of a network is to every other part of the network. The approach has been used to study social networks like Facebook and circuit engineering for electronics.
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