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BUSINESS
December 7, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
Social networks continued their domination of our lives in 2012 with U.S. users logging more than 121 billion minutes across numerous social networks in just July of this year. Put another way, that's more than 2 billion hours of viewing vacation photos and reading about a friend's new puppy. That's up 36% from 88.4 billion minutes spent on social media in July 2011, according to Nielsen's recently released 2012 social media report. Facebook alone accounts for a major portion of that time.
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BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Borrowing from Twitter and other social networks, LinkedIn will now let its users follow specific individuals and receive their updates. The professional social network announced Tuesday that users will be able to subscribe to 150 "influential thought leaders" to receive their posts. Previously, LinkedIn users could get updates from companies and industries but not individuals unless those individuals approved the connection. LinkedIn follows other social networks who have this feature including Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Instagram.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival starts Friday, and that means hundreds of thousands of smartphone users will descend on Indio. And when you get that many people in one location, there's bound to be some connectivity issues. That's why the four major wireless carriers say they're going out of their way to make sure there is enough network capacity for their customers to make calls, send texts and upload photos and videos to their social networks. Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint understand that at events such as Coachella -- where as many as 90,000 people may show up on one day -- users see just how good their networks are, and perhaps more important, how well their friends' carriers hold up. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 AT&T, for example, said it will be using all 18 beams of its super multi-beam antenna.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | Michelle Maltais
Think the job market is in the toilet? For some, that's absolutely right. They are looking for a job while doing their business.  This insight comes courtesy of a survey by the Polling Co. on behalf of Jobvite out Thursday highlighting where and how people are looking for work. They asked a sample of 2,135 adults about their approach to job opportunities. Two things that were increasingly becoming go-to tools for job searches, according to the survey: mobile devices and social media. Of those surveyed, 43% used their mobile device to find work.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Google Inc.'s online communities have little traction in the United States, but the Web search leader continues to seek a spot in the social-networking hierarchy. First, it must contend with Facebook Inc., the No. 2 online hangout behind MySpace Inc. Days after Google unveiled Friend Connect, which lets the sites of musicians, political campaigns and others incorporate profile data from several social networks, Facebook began to block the program. Although Google was taking advantage of the same tools Facebook made available for free to other outside developers, Facebook said Google was violating Facebook's restrictions on sharing data.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Researchers have some new advice for high school students who want to improve their grades: Become friends with academically oriented classmates. It may sound obvious, but researchers went to considerable effort to prove it. They surveyed all members of the junior class at Maine-Endwell High School in Endwell, N.Y., and asked students to rate each of their classmates as either a “best friend,” a “friend,” an “acquaintance” or someone they didn't know. They got responses from 92% of students and used them to reconstruct the social networks among 158 11th-graders as of Jan. 11, 2011.
SCIENCE
November 26, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Scientists have uncovered a key property of comatose brains that differentiates them from normal brains and may explain what goes wrong during severe brain injury. The report , published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, utilizes graph theory, which uses data to determine how well connected each part of a network is to every other part of the network. The approach has been used to study social networks like Facebook and circuit engineering for electronics.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2009 | David Colker
Americans need a laugh right now. Humor sites on the Web scored the biggest gains of all categories of subject matter tracked by ComScore Media Metrix in August. The category was up 21% in visitors compared with a year earlier, according to the ratings firm. Overall, the laughter sites attracted nearly 33.7 million visitors during the month. The leading humor site in the survey was Break.com, which features video clips, often of accidental, painful falls -- for laughs. Second most popular was Comedy Central.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Pat Benson
Times technology writer Salvador Rodriguez is at the Coachella Music and Arts Festival, testing apps and smartphones in between catching sets. One of the things Rodriguez will be keeping tabs on is how good cell service is at the festival. Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint are all trying to make a good impression with their customers there. The four major wireless carriers say they're going out of their way to make sure there is enough network capacity for their customers to make calls, send texts and upload photos and videos to their social networks.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- If he were on Facebook, Stuart Smalley would probably update his status: "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and doggone it, people like me!" Turns out that Smalley, played by Al Franken in the "Saturday Night Live" skit, knew a thing or two about human nature. One of the main reasons people turn to Facebook? Daily affirmations of their self-worth. That's according to a new study from University of Wisconsin-Madison professor Catalina Toma and Cornell University professor Jeffrey Hancock.
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