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BUSINESS
December 7, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
Social networks continued their domination of our lives in 2012 with U.S. users logging more than 121 billion minutes across numerous social networks in just July of this year. Put another way, that's more than 2 billion hours of viewing vacation photos and reading about a friend's new puppy. That's up 36% from 88.4 billion minutes spent on social media in July 2011, according to Nielsen's recently released 2012 social media report. Facebook alone accounts for a major portion of that time.
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NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Teenagers coping with  chronic health problems like asthma or obesity already have it tough. But a new study says they face another obstacle as well: making friends. Researchers have long known that people who have more friends tend to be healthier. Arizona State University sociologist Steven Haas wondered if the reverse was true as well. Haas and his research partners found that teenagers were less likely to say they are friends with a fellow student if he or she is sick.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival starts Friday, and that means hundreds of thousands of smartphone users will descend on Indio. And when you get that many people in one location, there's bound to be some connectivity issues. That's why the four major wireless carriers say they're going out of their way to make sure there is enough network capacity for their customers to make calls, send texts and upload photos and videos to their social networks. Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint understand that at events such as Coachella -- where as many as 90,000 people may show up on one day -- users see just how good their networks are, and perhaps more important, how well their friends' carriers hold up. PHOTOS: The top smartphones of 2013 AT&T, for example, said it will be using all 18 beams of its super multi-beam antenna.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Perhaps anything is possible with social media -- but even so, this story caught me off guard: A man donated his kidney to a stranger after seeing a plea on Facebook. Jeff Kurze's kidneys were failing, according to the story . His wife, Roxy, posted on her wall in desperation: "Wishing a kidney would fall out of the sky so my husband can stop suffering," the 30-year-old Web designer wrote. "So if anyone knows of a live donor with type O blood, PLEASE let me know. " Ricky Cisco, a 25-year-old comedian, saw the post and messaged Roxy, saying he wanted to help.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The popular online social hangout Facebook Inc. says it is setting up a new system that will allow its 70 million users to take their personal profiles with them as they surf other websites. Users will be able to automatically copy pictures, personal information and other customized applications established on Facebook to other websites without extra effort once the changes that were announced Friday take effect. The privacy settings attached to a person's Facebook profile will remain in effect at external websites.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Borrowing from Twitter and other social networks, LinkedIn will now let its users follow specific individuals and receive their updates. The professional social network announced Tuesday that users will be able to subscribe to 150 "influential thought leaders" to receive their posts. Previously, LinkedIn users could get updates from companies and industries but not individuals unless those individuals approved the connection. LinkedIn follows other social networks who have this feature including Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Instagram.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- If he were on Facebook, Stuart Smalley would probably update his status: "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and doggone it, people like me!" Turns out that Smalley, played by Al Franken in the "Saturday Night Live" skit, knew a thing or two about human nature. One of the main reasons people turn to Facebook? Daily affirmations of their self-worth. That's according to a new study from University of Wisconsin-Madison professor Catalina Toma and Cornell University professor Jeffrey Hancock.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Remember the good old days when all you had to worry about was what potential employers might find in a Google search? Now, some employers are asking for the keys to job applicants' virtual clubhouse so they can click around and get a better look. Reports are resurfacing about public agencies requiring applicants to allow them to log in for full access to their Facebook account. Is this in-depth social network profiling of a potential employee fair -- or legal? “I would argue that it's an invasion of privacy and violation of anti-discrimination law,” said employment attorney Amy Semmel of Kelley Semmel in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Jeriel Judah , Kimberly Alison and Claire Printz share the same problem, according to recent Twitter posts: They have too many email accounts. A survey released Tuesday shows the average adult Internet user has 3.1 email accounts, up from 2.6 a year ago. They're also active on a greater number of social media websites, according to the Harris Interactive poll commissioned by MyLife.com . The Los Angeles firm has Web and mobile applications where users can control multiple social media and email profiles at once.
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