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BUSINESS
February 7, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- If he were on Facebook, Stuart Smalley would probably update his status: "I'm good enough, I'm smart enough, and doggone it, people like me!" Turns out that Smalley, played by Al Franken in the "Saturday Night Live" skit, knew a thing or two about human nature. One of the main reasons people turn to Facebook? Daily affirmations of their self-worth. That's according to a new study from University of Wisconsin-Madison professor Catalina Toma and Cornell University professor Jeffrey Hancock.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Here's something parents can "Like": Teens who interact with their parents on Facebook are also more likely to feel closer to them in real life. A study released this week by Brigham Young University says parents who connect with their kids on Facebook and other social networks are likely to build a stronger connection with them in real life. These teens also have higher rates of "pro social behavior," meaning they are more generous, kind and helpful to others, according to the study.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
Social networks continued their domination of our lives in 2012 with U.S. users logging more than 121 billion minutes across numerous social networks in just July of this year. Put another way, that's more than 2 billion hours of viewing vacation photos and reading about a friend's new puppy. That's up 36% from 88.4 billion minutes spent on social media in July 2011, according to Nielsen's recently released 2012 social media report. Facebook alone accounts for a major portion of that time.
NEWS
December 10, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Teenagers coping with  chronic health problems like asthma or obesity already have it tough. But a new study says they face another obstacle as well: making friends. Researchers have long known that people who have more friends tend to be healthier. Arizona State University sociologist Steven Haas wondered if the reverse was true as well. Haas and his research partners found that teenagers were less likely to say they are friends with a fellow student if he or she is sick.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Twitter may still be a small player in the digital advertising world, but its advertising platform has more promise than that of Facebook and could justify the company's potential market value, which has risen by several billion dollars ahead of its initial public offering on Thursday. That's according to a new national survey from Frank N. Magid Associates, which says consumers respond more positively to ads on Twitter than they do to ads on Facebook - in large part because the ads blend so smoothly into the service.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | Michelle Maltais
Think the job market is in the toilet? For some, that's absolutely right. They are looking for a job while doing their business.  This insight comes courtesy of a survey by the Polling Co. on behalf of Jobvite out Thursday highlighting where and how people are looking for work. They asked a sample of 2,135 adults about their approach to job opportunities. Two things that were increasingly becoming go-to tools for job searches, according to the survey: mobile devices and social media. Of those surveyed, 43% used their mobile device to find work.
SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | Monte Morin
Ever feel the rainy-day blues on a bright and sunny afternoon? If so, your Facebook account may be to blame, according to new research. In a paper published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE, scientists argued that the hugely popular social networking site exerts an emotional "spillover" effect that may carry significant consequences for an increasingly interconnected world. By analyzing more than a billion Facebook status updates, authors concluded that emotionally positive posts gave rise to more positive posts by friends, while negative posts spawned more negative posts.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Perhaps anything is possible with social media -- but even so, this story caught me off guard: A man donated his kidney to a stranger after seeing a plea on Facebook. Jeff Kurze's kidneys were failing, according to the story . His wife, Roxy, posted on her wall in desperation: "Wishing a kidney would fall out of the sky so my husband can stop suffering," the 30-year-old Web designer wrote. "So if anyone knows of a live donor with type O blood, PLEASE let me know. " Ricky Cisco, a 25-year-old comedian, saw the post and messaged Roxy, saying he wanted to help.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
With the "Breaking Bad" series finale coming this weekend, it's certain that a flurry of spoilers are going to be plastered across Facebook and Twitter. But there is a way to avoid seeing them without having to spend Sunday night under a rock. A free iPhone and iPad app that launched this week called Spoiler Shield claims to be able to block spoilers from "Breaking Bad" while still giving users access to other content on their Facebook and Twitter feeds. PHOTOS: Top 11 hidden, cool features in Apple's iOS 7 Besides "Breaking Bad," Spoiler Shield can also block spoilers from about 30 other TV shows as well as NFL and Major League Baseball results.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Researchers have some new advice for high school students who want to improve their grades: Become friends with academically oriented classmates. It may sound obvious, but researchers went to considerable effort to prove it. They surveyed all members of the junior class at Maine-Endwell High School in Endwell, N.Y., and asked students to rate each of their classmates as either a “best friend,” a “friend,” an “acquaintance” or someone they didn't know. They got responses from 92% of students and used them to reconstruct the social networks among 158 11th-graders as of Jan. 11, 2011.
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