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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | BENJAMIN S. LAMBETH, Benjamin S. Lambeth is a senior specialist in Russian affairs at the Rand Corp
Alexander Lebed is a man virtually unknown to Americans, yet he merits our serious attention, for if current forecasts hold true, he could become Russia's next president. His meteoric rise in just the past year and his prospect for a big win in Sunday's parliamentary elections indicate that the 45-year-old former army general commands enough of a following that he might displace Boris Yeltsin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 21, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- A 16-year-old schoolboy has been arrested under a controversial new Chinese crime of spreading rumors over the Internet. The boy, identified only by his surname, Yang, was detained at his junior high school in northwestern China's Gansu province Tuesday and charged with inciting disputes, as part of a crackdown implemented this month. The teenager's crime involved Internet posts in which he questioned whether police were properly investigating the death of a man who fell from an upper floor of a karaoke club.
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NEWS
January 14, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Politicians and activists in Poland are debating whether to tighten restrictions on pornography, which has been easily available in this predominantly Catholic country since the 1989 collapse of communism. "A battle for Poland is being fought today," Zdzislaw Pupa, a conservative lawmaker, declared before Parliament's lower house last month approved a tough measure with Europe's most explicit legal definition of hard-core pornography.
WORLD
March 18, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When she was 19, Neide Cardeal da Silva left her family, who barely scraped by living off the land, to move in with a family she'd never met. For the next 10 years, she and two other young women worked for Miss Maria Cecilia, keeping the house and family in order. On her one day off a week, she used the apartment's second door, which led directly to the servants' quarters. The worst part about her arrangement, she says, was feeling she was always being watched.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | BETTYANN KEVLES
Revolution, by definition, is discontinuity. Science is based on continuity. How then have the sciences survived in a self-consciously revolutionary society like the Soviet Union? Loren R. Graham, an MIT historian of Russian science, presents this paradox in his introduction to "Science and the Soviet Order," the first book to examine the intricate histories and special role of physics, engineering, space science, biology, medicine and communications in the years after the October Revolution.
BOOKS
June 13, 1999 | VIRGINIA POSTREL, Virginia Postrel is the editor of Reason magazine and the author of "The Future and Its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress" (The Free Press)
Francis Fukuyama likes big subjects and bold claims. In 1989, he burst into public consciousness with his provocatively titled National Interest article, "The End of History," later expanded into a book, "The End of History and the Last Man" (1992). His thesis: Liberal, democratic capitalism represents the final stage in the Hegelian evolution of governing regimes, and the fall of the Soviet Union settled the debate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the early summer of 1990, playwright Oana-Maria Hock visited her native Romania. What she found was a country struggling to find itself after a revolution that abolished Communist rule. The nation's reviled dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, had been executed a few months before, and Romania's new leader, Ion Iliescu, faced a crisis as hundreds of students fought with thousands of miners in Bucharest over the direction the new government was taking.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't happen in the usual way for Ezekiel Kutjok. He wasn't picked up in one of the national security forces' ubiquitous Toyota Land Cruisers and driven to a safehouse on this city's outskirts. He wasn't beaten. He wasn't tortured. He wasn't interrogated, except for some questions about his meeting with southern Sudanese rebels in Nairobi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1988 | TAWFIC FARAH, Tawfic Farah is the editor of the Journal of Arab Affairs.
The rioting in the West Bank and Gaza is what Middle East expert Clement Henry Moore has called the "Lebanonization" of Arab politics. Arabs in the streets are revolting against an intellectual, economic and political order that is spent. The people are angry and the elite are out of touch. There is a rage at a longstanding political and social order that distracted, anesthetized and depoliticized the people in the oil and non-oil Arab countries alike.
WORLD
March 18, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When she was 19, Neide Cardeal da Silva left her family, who barely scraped by living off the land, to move in with a family she'd never met. For the next 10 years, she and two other young women worked for Miss Maria Cecilia, keeping the house and family in order. On her one day off a week, she used the apartment's second door, which led directly to the servants' quarters. The worst part about her arrangement, she says, was feeling she was always being watched.
WORLD
November 12, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
BANGKOK, Thailand - Siripong Khwanthong sidles up to a lottery seller along a crowded street near Bangkok's Patpong pleasure district, studies the selection and settles on a ticket ending in 37. "The number just came to me," he says. "Maybe I'll be lucky tomorrow. " If the government has its way, Siripong soon will be buying lottery tickets from machines. And that's fine with him: Not only would it be more convenient, but it also could save money by cutting out the surcharge that street vendors command selling "lucky" numbers, which can add as much as 50% to the $2.70 ticket price.
WORLD
August 6, 2011 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
The camp has grown so big that it needs addresses. Debates are held at No. 199 Tent Blvd. Haircuts are on the house at Benny Zeevi's flower-decked tent, where the motto is "Life is beautiful, love will prevail. " There's even newspaper delivery, including a pile of financial papers plunked down on the sidewalk next to a tent with a "People Before Profits" sign. Photos: Tel Aviv tent town Part Woodstock, part boot camp, Tel Aviv's burgeoning protest encampment has become a small-scale experiment in a utopian society and a challenge to the established social order.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Chinese authorities struggled to restore order Monday after migrant workers, angry over the manhandling of a pregnant vendor, overturned police cars, smashed windows and set fires near the southern manufacturing hub of Guangzhou. It began as a run-of-the mill altercation Friday night when city authorities tried to clear the migrants, who are from Sichuan province, as they hawked produce in front of a supermarket in Zengcheng, on the outskirts of Guangzhou. But the ferocity of the rioting over the weekend exposed the fragility of social order in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2010 | By Meredith Blake
A boy, dressed up as a cowboy, sits under a dining room table, clutching the rods of a chair like bars on a prison cell. "Let me outta here! Let me outta here!" he screams. It's a scene from fictional adman Don Draper's most acclaimed commercial, and though it may just be a spot for a floor wax, viewers of "Mad Men" know that it symbolizes much more. The show, which ends its fourth season Sunday, has repeatedly used enclosed spaces ? elevators, closets, back seats ? to reinforce the themes of secrecy, repression and isolation that are central to the show.
OPINION
July 4, 2008
The Declaration of Independence, which we honor today, is replete with the internal tensions and contradictions of 18th century America, a paean to equality written by a slaveholder, a proclamation of "unalienable rights" by white, landed men willing to bestow those rights only on a precious few.
WORLD
December 4, 2007 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Protesters in Chinese-controlled Tibet were arrested during a riot that erupted after two Buddhist monks were taken into police custody, according to the government's news agency. The monks were arrested after a dispute with a shopkeeper, and the subsequent unrest triggered a crackdown, according to the New China News Agency. The incident occurred in mid-November but was only recently reported in China.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Chinese authorities struggled to restore order Monday after migrant workers, angry over the manhandling of a pregnant vendor, overturned police cars, smashed windows and set fires near the southern manufacturing hub of Guangzhou. It began as a run-of-the mill altercation Friday night when city authorities tried to clear the migrants, who are from Sichuan province, as they hawked produce in front of a supermarket in Zengcheng, on the outskirts of Guangzhou. But the ferocity of the rioting over the weekend exposed the fragility of social order in the nation.
BOOKS
August 20, 1995 | Erin J. Aubry, Erin Aubry is a frequent contributor to The Times
Who says the L.A. riots were for naught? They seem to have spawned--perhaps resuscitated is more accurate--an urban noir genre that clearly has L.A. at its center. Literarily speaking, what could be more perfect? L.A., the end of the western continental line, the country's last stubborn frontier of dreams even as we enter the next century, implodes and falls slowly amid silent screams and gallant efforts to save glittery face. Our history of urban strife is relatively recent, and the image of deprivation still hangs on L.A. poorly, like an ill-fitting suit.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2007 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Kid Nation," a new reality show in which 40 young people, ages 8 to 15, are "left" for 40 days in a New Mexico "ghost town," perhaps to form a more perfect union, finally premiered Wednesday night after weeks of controversy. I will happily admit that my first response to hearing this premise was something like, "Cool!" If meerkats can have a manor, it seems only fair that kids, who are people too, can have a nation.
WORLD
May 27, 2006 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Huang Weizhong, a farmer who led several hundred villagers in a fight to keep their land from being seized by the local government, has been sentenced to three years in prison by a local court for gathering a crowd to disturb social order. Rule of law is patchy in China, and vague legal charges such as disturbing social order are frequently employed against those who challenge authority. "We are furious," said Huang's older brother, 54-year old Huang Weide.
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